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Richard V Secord

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NEWS
February 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Richard V. Secord, one of four men indicted in the Iran-Contra affair, was arrested on suspicion of drunken driving early Sunday morning, police said. Secord, a retired Air Force major general, was arrested after officers saw his car weaving on a highway, Fairfax County police communications supervisor Pete Kirby said. Secord was taken to a detention center, where he appeared before a magistrate. It was not known whether a court date had been set.
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BUSINESS
June 20, 1994 | KEN STIER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord, who won notoriety for his role in the Iran-Contra scandal during the Reagan Administration, spent part of his Air Force career trying to bring this city to its knees. Nowadays, instead of flying combat missions in tactical fighter aircraft at several thousand feet, he is pounding the pavement, trying to make business deals with his former adversaries.
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NEWS
April 7, 1987 | United Press International
Retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord, a principal middleman in the Iran- contra affair, told a federal judge Monday that giving Senate investigators access to his foreign bank accounts would violate both the Constitution and a U.S.-Swiss treaty. The Senate select committee's request that he sign a waiver freeing the documents is a "plain and simple violation of Mr. Secord's rights under the First and Fifth amendments to the Constitution," his lawyer, Thomas Green, said.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A key figure in the Iran-Contra affair said Thursday that President Bush played a much larger role than he has admitted in promoting secret arms-for-hostages sales during the Ronald Reagan Administration. "Bush has claimed to have been 'out of the loop' with respect to the Iran initiative. That's absolutely false," retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord said in an interview promoting a book published today.
NEWS
June 8, 1987 | United Press International
Retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord wants to reappear before Congress to rebut criticism he used money from the Iran- contra deal for his benefit, insisting: "I'm not a profiteer," the New York Times reported Sunday. Secord was the first witness called by the congressional committees investigating the scheme to sell arms to Iran and divert the profits to the Nicaraguan rebels. Since Secord's appearance, witnesses have given testimony at odds with his, particularly Albert A.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The guilty plea Wednesday of Iran-Contra figure Richard V. Secord was hailed by federal prosecutors as closing an important chapter in their yearslong investigation of the scandal. Reid H. Weingarten, who was to try Secord on 12 felony charges beginning next Monday, told reporters that the former Air Force major general's admission that he lied to Congress in 1987 was "a significant step in this office's effort to expeditiously and fully complete its work."
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A jury in Miami was selected to decide a lawsuit that blames retired Air Force Major Gen. Richard V. Secord and a CIA-linked airline for the 1986 plane crash in Nicaragua that helped trigger the Iran-Contra probe. Cargo handler Eugene Hasenfus, who was captured and held for about three months after Nicaraguan troops shot down the plane, and the family of the plane's co-pilot, Wallace Sawyer Jr.
NEWS
July 23, 1989
Costa Rica has barred former White House aide Oliver L. North and former U.S. National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter from entering its territory after a yearlong parliamentary probe into arms and drugs smuggling, Information Minister Jorge Urbina said in San Jose, the nation's capital. Also banned from the country were ex-U.S. Ambassador Lewis A. Tambs, arms dealer Richard V. Secord and former CIA Costa Rica station chief Joseph F. Fernandez, Urbina said.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | The Washington Post
Retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord, a key figure in the network set up by former White House aide Oliver L. North to arm the Nicaraguan Contras, agreed Friday to drop an appeal of his conviction for his role in the Iran-Contra affair, according to court papers. In a plea agreement with independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, Secord last year pleaded guilty to a felony count of lying to congressional investigators and was sentenced to two years of probation.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former President Ronald Reagan denied allegations by Iran-Contra middleman Richard V. Secord, who accused him of continuing to avoid a full accounting of his role in the arms-for-hostages deal to finance Nicaraguan rebels. "Mr. Secord doesn't know what he's talking about," Reagan told reporters during a visit to a junior high school in New Orleans.
NEWS
August 11, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran CIA officer testified Monday that former CIA spy chief Clair E. George had expressed concern about retired Air Force Gen. Richard V. Secord's participation in the arms for hostages deal with Iran, despite earlier statements by George to the contrary. The reluctant but potentially damaging testimony by George W.
NEWS
August 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
Former CIA spymaster Clair E. George "purposely, willfully" concealed the fact that he had met arms middleman Richard V. Secord from senators investigating the Iran-Contra scandal, a former senator charged Friday. "When the question came up . . . he knew it all along. He never met Secord, he says, but we know he did," former Missouri Sen. Thomas F. Eagleton testified during George's criminal trial.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard V. Secord, a key operative in the Iran-Contra case, testified Wednesday that he took part in a 45-minute meeting with ex-CIA spy chief Clair E. George in January, 1986--nine months before George told a Senate committee he did not know Secord.
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court ruled Monday that prosecutors may not use race as a basis for excluding anyone from a jury in a criminal trial. The 7-2 ruling clarifies a landmark 1986 decision in which the court ruled that a black defendant's rights are violated when blacks are systematically excluded from his jury. In that case, Batson vs.
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eugene Hasenfus, who says his life has been on a steady downward slide since being shot down by a Sandinista rocket in 1986 while taking part in the illegal Contra resupply operation, was shot down again here Monday by a federal district court jury considering his claims for back pay and legal fees. After five weeks of testimony and five days of deliberation, the six-member panel found Iran-Contra figure Richard V.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A jury in Miami was selected to decide a lawsuit that blames retired Air Force Major Gen. Richard V. Secord and a CIA-linked airline for the 1986 plane crash in Nicaragua that helped trigger the Iran-Contra probe. Cargo handler Eugene Hasenfus, who was captured and held for about three months after Nicaraguan troops shot down the plane, and the family of the plane's co-pilot, Wallace Sawyer Jr.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord told the congressional Iran- contra investigating committees what he thinks about being regarded as a profiteer: not much. Senate committee counsel Arthur L. Liman asked Secord, in light of a "surplus" of $14 million generated by Iran sales, if there was a reason he didn't call it a "profit." This exchange followed: Secord: "Yes, because people have been calling me 'profiteer.' So I thought perhaps a change in terms might improve the accuracy."
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the almost four years since he was shot down over Nicaragua, helping to touch off what was to become known as the Iran-Contra scandal, life hasn't been easy for Eugene Hasenfus. He says he was out of work for a year, his three children suffer continuing harassment at school and he is more than $100,000 in debt. In April the family's house in Marinette, Wis., burned down. "I wish I could change history, but I can't," Hasenfus, 49, said here Monday. "I just have to live with it."
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | The Washington Post
Retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord, a key figure in the network set up by former White House aide Oliver L. North to arm the Nicaraguan Contras, agreed Friday to drop an appeal of his conviction for his role in the Iran-Contra affair, according to court papers. In a plea agreement with independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, Secord last year pleaded guilty to a felony count of lying to congressional investigators and was sentenced to two years of probation.
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