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Richard V Winrow

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-powered criminal defense lawyer pleaded with three federal appellate judges Monday to show leniency toward his client, a small-time Southeast Los Angeles drug dealer who is facing life in federal prison. Attorney Oscar Goodman of Las Vegas said that "fundamental fairness" demands that Richard V. Winrow's sentence of life without possibility of parole be overturned. Winrow received the sentence in December, 1989. A year earlier, police arrested him at his mother's Willowbrook home with 5.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-powered criminal defense lawyer pleaded with three federal appellate judges Monday to show leniency toward his client, a small-time Southeast Los Angeles drug dealer who is facing life in federal prison. Attorney Oscar Goodman of Las Vegas said that "fundamental fairness" demands that Richard V. Winrow's sentence of life without possibility of parole be overturned. Winrow received the sentence in December, 1989. A year earlier, police arrested him at his mother's Willowbrook home with 5.
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NEWS
December 7, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles Wednesday sentenced a 22-year-old man to life in prison without parole for possessing 5.5 ounces of crack cocaine, a relatively small amount in the booming world of drug trafficking. The case marked only the second time in the United States--and the first time in California--that a judge had imposed such a sentence under a 1988 federal narcotics trafficking statute that provides for vastly stiffer sentences whenever defendants have two or more prior drug offenses.
NEWS
October 7, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The attorneys for a small-time, 23-year-old South-Central Los Angeles drug dealer will invoke one of the most basic precepts of American law today by trying to persuade a federal appeals court that it would be "cruel and unusual punishment" to keep him in prison for the rest of his life. They are appealing the December, 1989, decision of a Los Angeles federal judge to sentence Richard V.
NEWS
October 7, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The attorneys for a small-time, 23-year-old South-Central Los Angeles drug dealer will invoke one of the most basic precepts of American law today by trying to persuade a federal appeals court that it would be "cruel and unusual punishment" to keep him in prison for the rest of his life. They are appealing the December, 1989, decision of a Los Angeles federal judge to sentence Richard V.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES and JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. District Court Judge David W. Williams, 79, grew up poor on 109th Street in South-Central Los Angeles, raised in an era when it was still not allowed for blacks to buy homes west of Western Avenue. Richard Winrow, 22, until Wednesday lived on 118th Street in South-Central, a little more than a mile away from where the judge was raised. An A student before dropping out of high school from "sheer boredom," Winrow was the youngest in a poor family of nine children.
OPINION
October 13, 1991
Explain to me judicial logic and fairness. Richard V. Winrow, a black youth from the South-Central Los Angeles streets, is convicted for possessing 5.5 ounces of cocaine with the intent to distribute. He is sentenced to life imprisonment without parole ("Drug Dealer's Life Sentence Called 'Cruel,' " Part A, Oct. 7). BCCI-controlled bank executives in Florida, convicted of drug money laundering running into untold millions, are given a slap on the wrist. There would be no significant worldwide drug crisis without the greedy participation of the banking system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1991
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Monday upheld a mandatory life sentence for a 23-year-old South-Central Los Angeles man convicted of possessing 5.5 ounces of crack cocaine with intent to sell it. Richard V. Winrow was sentenced in December, 1989, under a special federal statute for repeat drug offenders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1990
Who says our justice system doesn't work? Richard V. Winrow, convicted of possession of 5.5 ounces of cocaine with intent to distribute, was sentenced to life in prison without parole ("5 1/2 Ounces of Crack Brings Life Term With No Parole," Part A, Dec. 7). Secord, on the other hand, operator of a tremendous extra-governmental scam to make millions off U.S. taxpayers and supply arms illegally to a murderous U.S. mercenary army, has been sentenced to two years probation and fined $50. To add further insult to this outrageous outcome, Secord is now whining that the independent-prosecutor law cramps his style excessively, and is launching a campaign to have it repealed!
OPINION
December 17, 1989
The lesson couldn't have been clearer: One item in The Times reports that Richard V. Winrow, a black and ghetto-bred 22-year-old man, was sentenced to prison for life for dealing a small amount of cocaine (Part A, Dec. 7). The other item reports the hardly remarkable fact that large American companies have been profiting handsomely from the sale of millions of gallons of specialized chemicals vital to the making of the cocaine found in Winrow's possession (Part A, Dec. 5). The chemicals, it is reported, are shipped openly from Houston to Colombia in amounts far exceeding any legitimate need.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES and JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. District Court Judge David W. Williams, 79, grew up poor on 109th Street in South-Central Los Angeles, raised in an era when it was still not allowed for blacks to buy homes west of Western Avenue. Richard Winrow, 22, until Wednesday lived on 118th Street in South-Central, a little more than a mile away from where the judge was raised. An A student before dropping out of high school from "sheer boredom," Winrow was the youngest in a poor family of nine children.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles Wednesday sentenced a 22-year-old man to life in prison without parole for possessing 5.5 ounces of crack cocaine, a relatively small amount in the booming world of drug trafficking. The case marked only the second time in the United States--and the first time in California--that a judge had imposed such a sentence under a 1988 federal narcotics trafficking statute that provides for vastly stiffer sentences whenever defendants have two or more prior drug offenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1989
Four years after Southland residents were terrorized by a savage series of random attacks, Night Stalker Richard Ramirez was convicted of 13 counts of murder and sentenced to die in the gas chamber at San Quentin. The devil-worshiping drifter from El Paso delivered a chilling monologue before being escorted in chains from a Los Angeles courtroom for the last time. "I am beyond good and evil," he declared. "I will be avenged."
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