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Richard W

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BUSINESS
November 3, 2013
The company: Ceres Inc. Headquarters: Thousand Oaks Ticker: CERE Employees: 96 Leadership: Richard W. Hamilton, 50, chief executive Fiscal 2012 revenue: $5.4 million Fiscal 2012 net loss: $29.4 million Stock price: $1.48 at Friday's close 52-week range: $1.10 to $5.60 P/E ratio: N/A Quarterly dividend: None
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2013
The company: Ceres Inc. Headquarters: Thousand Oaks Ticker: CERE Employees: 96 Leadership: Richard W. Hamilton, 50, chief executive Fiscal 2012 revenue: $5.4 million Fiscal 2012 net loss: $29.4 million Stock price: $1.48 at Friday's close 52-week range: $1.10 to $5.60 P/E ratio: N/A Quarterly dividend: None
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NATIONAL
September 11, 2002
In July 2000, Richard W. Glasgow, 47, was named commanding officer of the Motor Lifeboat Station under the Golden Gate Bridge. It is the Coast Guard's busiest search-and-rescue unit on the West Coast. But the mission has changed since Sept. 11. The bridge is considered a potential next target for terrorists. * "We're always going to be focused on search and rescue. But a lot of our focus now is on defending the bridge. The crew takes it to heart. We call ourselves the Guardians of the Gate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2012
Richard W. Lyman Former president of Stanford University Richard W. Lyman, 88, a former president and provost of Stanford University who clamped down on student protests during the Vietnam War era, died Sunday of congestive heart failure in Palo Alto, the university announced. Lyman, a history professor, served as provost before becoming Stanford's seventh president from 1970 to 1980. He opposed the Vietnam War but had little tolerance for antiwar protests on campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2012
Richard W. Lyman Former president of Stanford University Richard W. Lyman, 88, a former president and provost of Stanford University who clamped down on student protests during the Vietnam War era, died Sunday of congestive heart failure in Palo Alto, the university announced. Lyman, a history professor, served as provost before becoming Stanford's seventh president from 1970 to 1980. He opposed the Vietnam War but had little tolerance for antiwar protests on campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1998
Richard W. Hamming, 82, who in 1947, as a researcher for Bell Telephone, discovered processes that allowed computers to correct their own errors, making many other computer advances possible. He also worked for the Manhattan Project during World War II, where he managed the computers used in building the first atomic bomb. On Jan. 7 at a hospital in Monterey of a heart attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2000
Richard W. Abbe, 74, retired justice of the state Court of Appeal based in Santa Barbara. Born in Paris, the son of globe-trotting photojournalist James Abbe Jr., the future jurist and his brother and sister in 1936 published a child's-eye view of prewar Europe, "Around the World in Eleven Years." Later, Abbe served as a Navy rear tail gunner during World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000
Richard William Pratt, a retired firefighter at Point Mugu Navy base, died Tuesday at his home in Oxnard from complications of lung cancer. He was 76. Pratt was born April 10, 1924, to William Pratt and Mary Wheatley in Los Angeles. He joined the Marines at the age of 17 to serve in the Pacific during World War II and he was later recalled to duty during the Korean War. Pratt married Assunta "Susie" Rocco in Chicago.
NEWS
November 7, 1992
Richard W. Hall, 65, whose six novels and several plays--all dealing with gay themes--made him one of the best-known figures in the homosexual community. He was the first openly gay critic elected to the National Book Critics Circle and also wrote book reviews for several publications and a book column for the Advocate, a gay magazine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998
The landscape of Ventura County changed in 1998 in ways that begin to make conservation of local agriculture more likely. The land use initiatives passed easily, though perhaps not due to any great interest in agriculture but to the citizens' interest in preserving the fine quality of life enjoyed here. Although we in agriculture are proud to provide the open-space amenities, we now look to the other side of the bargain. Our urban neighbors must be willing to provide us with the environment needed for viable long-term agriculture, and must allow us access to the necessary cultural tools that enable us to be competitive in the new reality of global sourcing and markets.
BOOKS
December 30, 2007 | Wendy Smith, Wendy Smith is a critic and the author of "Real Life Drama: The Group Theatre and America, 1931-1940."
There's a famous photograph taken on May 10, 1869, the day the Union Pacific and Central Pacific tracks met at Promontory Summit, Utah, to complete the nation's first transcontinental railroad. The Union Pacific's No. 119 and the Central Pacific's Jupiter touch cowcatchers, workers swarm over the engines, men representing each railroad shake hands at the center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2006 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein joined environmentalists Tuesday to urge defeat of a bill in Congress that they say will open the California coast to a new wave of oil and gas exploration. The Democratic senator from California took the unusual step of holding a news conference in Santa Monica -- that overlooked waves lapping the shore -- to plead for public support against the Deep Ocean Energy Act. Feinstein said the bill, sponsored by California Rep. Richard W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2005 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Richard W. Reuter, 86, executive director of CARE International from 1954 to 1962, died Friday of cardiac arrest at his home in Lake Bluff, Ill., the humanitarian organization announced. During his tenure, the focus of CARE's mission changed from postwar Europe to developing areas of the world, including Asia and Latin America. While at CARE, Reuter worked with President Kennedy and Sargent Shriver to start the Peace Corps.
BOOKS
September 12, 2004 | John Lukacs, John Lukacs is a historian and the author of many books, including "The Hitler of History."
"The Dictators" of Richard Overy's new book are Hitler and Stalin. There is some trouble with the very title. "Every South American popinjay can be a dictator," Hitler is said to have remarked. "I am not a dictator." Dictators are petty tyrants, dependent on small coteries supporting them by force. Hitler was a leader not of a determined minority but of a majority and often declared that "we National Socialists are true democrats." There was at least some truth in that, alas.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2002
In July 2000, Richard W. Glasgow, 47, was named commanding officer of the Motor Lifeboat Station under the Golden Gate Bridge. It is the Coast Guard's busiest search-and-rescue unit on the West Coast. But the mission has changed since Sept. 11. The bridge is considered a potential next target for terrorists. * "We're always going to be focused on search and rescue. But a lot of our focus now is on defending the bridge. The crew takes it to heart. We call ourselves the Guardians of the Gate.
BOOKS
May 27, 2001 | KEN EMERSON, Ken Emerson, the author of "Doodah!: Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture" and co-author of a recent documentary about Foster on PBS's "The American Experience," is working on a book about the Brill Building sound and pop songwriting in New York during the 1950s and '60s
Photographs of Duke Ellington and Billie Holiday nearly crowd out the rest of American music on the cover of Richard Crawford's opus, suggesting that "America's Musical Life: A History" may be yet another companion volume to Ken Burns' "Jazz." Weighing in at 976 pages, the book takes nearly as long to absorb as the 18-hour documentary but, unlike the film, it doesn't insist that jazz is the music of America or imply that it is America's only or best music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2005 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Richard W. Reuter, 86, executive director of CARE International from 1954 to 1962, died Friday of cardiac arrest at his home in Lake Bluff, Ill., the humanitarian organization announced. During his tenure, the focus of CARE's mission changed from postwar Europe to developing areas of the world, including Asia and Latin America. While at CARE, Reuter worked with President Kennedy and Sargent Shriver to start the Peace Corps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2000 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Generation-Xers, by some definitions the 80 million Americans born between 1961 and 1981, have been variously portrayed as slackers and cynics, entrepreneurial cyber-elitists and idealistic multiculturalists. They have also been seen as religiously indifferent, staying away from mainstream churches in droves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2000
Richard W. Abbe, 74, retired justice of the state Court of Appeal based in Santa Barbara. Born in Paris, the son of globe-trotting photojournalist James Abbe Jr., the future jurist and his brother and sister in 1936 published a child's-eye view of prewar Europe, "Around the World in Eleven Years." Later, Abbe served as a Navy rear tail gunner during World War II.
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