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Richard W Lyman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2012
Richard W. Lyman Former president of Stanford University Richard W. Lyman, 88, a former president and provost of Stanford University who clamped down on student protests during the Vietnam War era, died Sunday of congestive heart failure in Palo Alto, the university announced. Lyman, a history professor, served as provost before becoming Stanford's seventh president from 1970 to 1980. He opposed the Vietnam War but had little tolerance for antiwar protests on campus.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2012
Richard W. Lyman Former president of Stanford University Richard W. Lyman, 88, a former president and provost of Stanford University who clamped down on student protests during the Vietnam War era, died Sunday of congestive heart failure in Palo Alto, the university announced. Lyman, a history professor, served as provost before becoming Stanford's seventh president from 1970 to 1980. He opposed the Vietnam War but had little tolerance for antiwar protests on campus.
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NEWS
May 8, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Rockefeller Foundation announced Saturday that it had chosen Peter C. Goldmark Jr., a senior vice president of Times Mirror Co., as its new president and chief executive officer. Goldmark, 47, will assume his new duties in July as head of one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious philanthropic organizations. "This was an impossible challenge to turn down," said Goldmark, whose duties at Times Mirror included being in charge of the company's five Eastern newspapers.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Rockefeller Foundation announced Saturday that it had chosen Peter C. Goldmark Jr., a senior vice president of Times Mirror Co., as its new president and chief executive officer. Goldmark, 47, will assume his new duties in July as head of one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious philanthropic organizations. "This was an impossible challenge to turn down," said Goldmark, whose duties at Times Mirror included being in charge of the company's five Eastern newspapers.
NEWS
December 9, 1987
Richard W. Lyman, president of the Rockefeller Foundation and president emeritus of Stanford University, will return to Stanford next Sept. 1 as the first director of its Institute of International Studies, the university announced. Lyman, a historian, served as Stanford's president from 1970 to 1980, when he became head of the foundation. He faces mandatory retirement from his Rockefeller Foundation post next year when he turns 65.
NEWS
January 23, 1988
James Siena, 55, a Stanford Law School graduate who served as deputy undersecretary for international affairs in the Department of the Army, legal adviser to Stanford President Richard W. Lyman during the height of campus student demonstrations, and then became assistant secretary for international security affairs in the Defense Department. At the time of his death Jan.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Richard W. Lyman, president of the Rockefeller Foundation and president emeritus of Stanford University, will return to Stanford next Sept. 1 as the first director of its Institute of International Studies, the university announced Tuesday. Lyman, who is a historian, served as Stanford's president from 1970 to 1980, when he became head of the foundation. Lyman, who turns 65 next year, faces mandatory retirement from his Rockefeller Foundation post.
NEWS
May 1, 1986 | DAVID JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
The Rockefeller Foundation Wednesday announced a 15-year plan to adapt Western science and technology to alleviate poverty in developing countries. As much as $300 million will be committed in the first five years to "the equitable distribution of benefits inherent in scientific advance and technological innovation," President Richard W. Lyman said in Manhattan.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
After an escalating series of conflicts between trustees and top administrators of Stanford University and W. Glenn Campbell, the combative, conservative director of the Hoover Institution on campus, the Stanford Board of Trustees last week finally moved to force Campbell's retirement. A series of interviews with trustees, administrators and faculty leaders on both sides reveals that relations between Stanford and Hoover, never very good, have deteriorated badly in the first few months of 1988.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
At the end of its first 95 years, Stanford University has an endowment valued at $1.5 billion. On its faculty are nine Nobel Prize winners, five winners of the Pulitzer Prize and 77 members of the National Academy of Sciences. It has a highly intelligent student body, if grades and test scores are accurate measures. It can even boast of having produced one of this year's Super Bowl quarterbacks, John Elway.
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