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Richard W Miller

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1989 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years after his arrest on charges of spying for the Soviet Union, former FBI agent Richard W. Miller emerged from federal custody Monday, free on bond pending his third espionage trial. Empty-handed and wearing a borrowed gray suit, Miller was released at 3:15 p.m. after posting $337,000 bond, according to his lawyers and federal authorities. It was his first taste of freedom since he was taken into custody in 1984.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once asked to describe his former lover, ex-FBI agent and convicted spy Richard W. Miller replied that Svetlana Ogorodnikova was "charming, outgoing, vivacious" and that she spoke atrocious English. After 11 years in prison on espionage charges, Ogorodnikova still speaks fractured English. But the charm and vivacity are in little evidence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1989
"He was happy about it, but not wildly. He's an understated guy. He sort of takes convictions, reversals, anything that happens to him the same way." --Joel Levine, attorney for Richard W. Miller, the bumbling FBI agent whose double life sentence for espionage was set aside Tuesday by a federal appeals court, which ordered a new trial because jurors were told too many details about lie detector tests that he failed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993
Richard W. Miller, the only FBI agent ever convicted of espionage, lost a bid Wednesday to overturn his 1990 conviction, which he said was won using improperly obtained evidence. In a unanimous opinion, three judges of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals--Robert R. Beezer, Alex Kozinski and Andrew J. Kleinfield--found that Miller's 1984 confession was not coerced, as he claimed. Among other things, Miller argued that he had been improperly influenced by Special Agent Richard T.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wang Chairman Resigns: Richard W. Miller, who spent the last three years trying to save Wang Laboratories Inc. from collapse, announced that he will resign now that the computer company is completing its bankruptcy reorganization plan. Miller said he voluntarily decided to step down because Lowell, Mass.-based Wang is planning to emerge from bankruptcy proceedings as a much smaller company and needs to shrink its management structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1989
A proposal that convicted Soviet spy Richard W. Miller be released from prison on $450,000 bond while awaiting a possible third espionage trial was taken under consideration Wednesday by a Los Angeles federal judge. "The court is not so sure how it will rule," said U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon. "I will sleep on it. Let it sink in overnight." The recommendation for the release of Miller, 52, a former FBI agent who was sentenced to two life prison terms plus 50 years for passing a secret FBI document to the Soviet Union, was made by Val T. Howard, an investigator for the pretrial services section of the U.S. District Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989
Richard W. Miller, the former FBI agent whose espionage conviction was overturned by an appeals court, lost a bid Wednesday to be freed on bail pending his third trial. In a three-page ruling, U.S. District Judge David Kenyon in Los Angeles said the weight of the evidence against the former agent, combined with the risk that he will flee before trial, precludes Miller's release on bail.
NEWS
October 13, 1989
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals today ordered that bail be set for Richard W. Miller, the ex-FBI agent whose espionage conviction was reversed but who has remained in prison pending retrial. The appellate court reversed a detention order issued by U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon in Los Angeles after Miller's conviction was reversed. "The government has failed to show by a preponderance of the evidence that (Miller) constitutes a flight risk," the court said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993
Richard W. Miller, the only FBI agent ever convicted of espionage, lost a bid Wednesday to overturn his 1990 conviction, which he said was won using improperly obtained evidence. In a unanimous opinion, three judges of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals--Robert R. Beezer, Alex Kozinski and Andrew J. Kleinfield--found that Miller's 1984 confession was not coerced, as he claimed. Among other things, Miller argued that he had been improperly influenced by Special Agent Richard T.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard W. Miller, the first FBI agent ever accused of espionage, was found guilty Tuesday of passing secret documents to the Soviet Union in exchange for a promised $65,000 in gold and cash. As in his previous two trials, Miller was portrayed as a bumbling agent who had a sexual affair and espionage misadventures with an alcoholic Soviet spy, Svetlana Ogorodnikova, who, the prosecution charged, lured Miller into betraying his profession and his country.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wang Chairman Resigns: Richard W. Miller, who spent the last three years trying to save Wang Laboratories Inc. from collapse, announced that he will resign now that the computer company is completing its bankruptcy reorganization plan. Miller said he voluntarily decided to step down because Lowell, Mass.-based Wang is planning to emerge from bankruptcy proceedings as a much smaller company and needs to shrink its management structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Larry Lawler arrived from Minneapolis in April, 1988, to take over the FBI's Los Angeles office, he found the nation's third largest bureau battered by an espionage scandal, discrimination allegations and agents despondent over low pay. "Morale was pretty low," Lawler said in an interview last week in his office in the Federal Building in Westwood. What's more, things got worse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former FBI Agent Richard W. Miller was sentenced Monday to 20 years in prison for espionage by a federal judge in Los Angeles, who also took a slap at the FBI for allowing an agent of "susceptible qualities" to hold a sensitive counterintelligence position. Miller, 54, the only FBI agent ever convicted of espionage, was found guilty last October of passing secret documents to the Soviet Union in exchange for a promised $65,000 in gold and cash. Miller, declared U.S. District Judge Robert M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard W. Miller says he tends "to eat more" when under stress, and these days the former Los Angeles FBI agent is under considerable stress. Miller, 53, was convicted by U.S. District Judge Robert M. Takasugi on Tuesday of espionage--the first FBI agent ever found guilty of spying. His sentencing is set for Jan. 7, and he faces a maximum sentence of two life prison terms plus 50 years. Until he learns his sentence, "R.W.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard W. Miller, the first FBI agent ever accused of espionage, was found guilty Tuesday of passing secret documents to the Soviet Union in exchange for a promised $65,000 in gold and cash. As in his previous two trials, Miller was portrayed as a bumbling agent who had a sexual affair and espionage misadventures with an alcoholic Soviet spy, Svetlana Ogorodnikova, who, the prosecution charged, lured Miller into betraying his profession and his country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of his third trial for spying, former FBI agent Richard W. Miller testified Tuesday during a pretrial hearing that he confessed to passing a secret bureau manual to the Soviet Union because he was trying hard to please the fellow agents who were interrogating him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of his third trial for spying, former FBI agent Richard W. Miller testified Tuesday during a pretrial hearing that he confessed to passing a secret bureau manual to the Soviet Union because he was trying hard to please the fellow agents who were interrogating him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once asked to describe his former lover, ex-FBI agent and convicted spy Richard W. Miller replied that Svetlana Ogorodnikova was "charming, outgoing, vivacious" and that she spoke atrocious English. After 11 years in prison on espionage charges, Ogorodnikova still speaks fractured English. But the charm and vivacity are in little evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He scrounges for a living, making it on $97 a month worth of food stamps and some welfare cash for other living expenses. His beat-up 15-year-old Toyota, bought at a bargain basement price of $300, needed mechanical work that cost more than the car. He lives in a frayed, one-bedroom apartment in West Hollywood, where he pays $306 a month rent. His new job, driving a passenger van for a hotel, pays $5.50 an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to swiftly resolve his long-standing case, former FBI agent Richard W. Miller on Friday waived his right to a jury trial on charges that he passed U.S. secrets to Soviet spies. The unexpected move means that U.S. District Judge Robert Takasugi in Los Angeles will decide the guilt or innocence of Miller, who had his previous espionage conviction overturned by a federal appeals court last year. Takasugi set a new trial date for Aug. 21. This will be his third trial for Miller, 52.
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