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Richard W Murphy

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NEWS
September 14, 1988 | From Reuters
U.S. special envoy Richard W. Murphy arrived in Damascus on Tuesday for talks with Syrian leaders on Lebanon's presidential elections, set for Sept. 22, diplomats said. Murphy's visit came 24 hours after the Speaker of the Lebanese Parliament, Hussein Husseini, set the new date for electing a successor to President Amin Gemayel. The diplomats said Murphy's talks in Syria, the main foreign power broker in Lebanon, are important to prepare for the elections.
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NEWS
September 14, 1988 | From Reuters
U.S. special envoy Richard W. Murphy arrived in Damascus on Tuesday for talks with Syrian leaders on Lebanon's presidential elections, set for Sept. 22, diplomats said. Murphy's visit came 24 hours after the Speaker of the Lebanese Parliament, Hussein Husseini, set the new date for electing a successor to President Amin Gemayel. The diplomats said Murphy's talks in Syria, the main foreign power broker in Lebanon, are important to prepare for the elections.
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NEWS
April 15, 1985 | From Reuters
King Hussein of Jordan reviewed the latest developments in the search for Mideast peace Sunday with President Reagan's special envoy Richard W. Murphy, the official Jordanian news agency said. The assistant secretary of state arrived in Amman on Saturday on the first leg of a tour that will also take him to Syria, Egypt and Israel. In addition to Hussein, Murphy on Sunday met with Prime Minister Zayed Rifai; Foreign Minister Taher Masri; the armed forces commander in chief, Lt. Gen.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
King Hussein flew to Damascus on Monday and immediately began discussions with Syrian President Hafez Assad on Jordan's break with the Israeli-held West Bank and peace efforts to end the Persian Gulf War. The king was accompanied by Prime Minister Zaid Rifai on what was expected to be a one-day trip. Jordan has backed Iraq in the gulf war but has stayed on good terms with Syria, which supports non-Arab Iran. Meanwhile, Assistant Secretary of State Richard W.
NEWS
October 23, 1987
Richard W. Murphy, the State Department's Middle East trouble-shooter, visited Damascus to confer with Syrian officials on efforts to revive the Mideast peace process, a department spokeswoman said. Phyllis Oakley described Murphy's visit as an exception to a policy banning top-level U.S. visits to Syria imposed almost a year ago by the Reagan Administration. She said Murphy is in Syria to "continue the dialogue and consultations" conducted by Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
King Hussein flew to Damascus on Monday and immediately began discussions with Syrian President Hafez Assad on Jordan's break with the Israeli-held West Bank and peace efforts to end the Persian Gulf War. The king was accompanied by Prime Minister Zaid Rifai on what was expected to be a one-day trip. Jordan has backed Iraq in the gulf war but has stayed on good terms with Syria, which supports non-Arab Iran. Meanwhile, Assistant Secretary of State Richard W.
NEWS
May 23, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The White House delivered a sharp public rebuke to the State Department's chief Middle East specialist Friday, disavowing his suggestion that the United States would respond militarily if Iran attacked U.S. Navy-protected Kuwaiti oil tankers. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater, talking to reporters aboard President Reagan's Air Force One jetliner, said that Richard W.
NEWS
February 14, 1985 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
In the first comprehensive Mideast consultations between the superpowers in almost a decade, U.S. and Soviet experts will meet Tuesday in Vienna to exchange views on the Iran-Iraq war, Lebanon and the Arab-Israeli dispute, the State Department announced Wednesday.
NEWS
December 7, 1985 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Following an indecisive meeting of the Palestinian leadership in Baghdad, a sense of deep pessimism has displaced previous optimism about efforts to arrange a Mideast peace settlement. "I think the peace process is pretty much dead," said a Western diplomat who only a month ago was predicting major progress in arranging talks between Jordan and Israel under the auspices of an international conference.
NEWS
November 3, 1985 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
A recent series of public diplomatic initiatives and secret understandings, carefully coordinated by the Reagan Administration, has raised a serious glimmer of hope that Middle East peace talks will be convened within the next two months, according to Western diplomats and Arab officials.
NEWS
October 23, 1987
Richard W. Murphy, the State Department's Middle East trouble-shooter, visited Damascus to confer with Syrian officials on efforts to revive the Mideast peace process, a department spokeswoman said. Phyllis Oakley described Murphy's visit as an exception to a policy banning top-level U.S. visits to Syria imposed almost a year ago by the Reagan Administration. She said Murphy is in Syria to "continue the dialogue and consultations" conducted by Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
May 23, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The White House delivered a sharp public rebuke to the State Department's chief Middle East specialist Friday, disavowing his suggestion that the United States would respond militarily if Iran attacked U.S. Navy-protected Kuwaiti oil tankers. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater, talking to reporters aboard President Reagan's Air Force One jetliner, said that Richard W.
NEWS
December 7, 1985 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Following an indecisive meeting of the Palestinian leadership in Baghdad, a sense of deep pessimism has displaced previous optimism about efforts to arrange a Mideast peace settlement. "I think the peace process is pretty much dead," said a Western diplomat who only a month ago was predicting major progress in arranging talks between Jordan and Israel under the auspices of an international conference.
NEWS
November 3, 1985 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
A recent series of public diplomatic initiatives and secret understandings, carefully coordinated by the Reagan Administration, has raised a serious glimmer of hope that Middle East peace talks will be convened within the next two months, according to Western diplomats and Arab officials.
NEWS
April 15, 1985 | From Reuters
King Hussein of Jordan reviewed the latest developments in the search for Mideast peace Sunday with President Reagan's special envoy Richard W. Murphy, the official Jordanian news agency said. The assistant secretary of state arrived in Amman on Saturday on the first leg of a tour that will also take him to Syria, Egypt and Israel. In addition to Hussein, Murphy on Sunday met with Prime Minister Zayed Rifai; Foreign Minister Taher Masri; the armed forces commander in chief, Lt. Gen.
NEWS
February 14, 1985 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
In the first comprehensive Mideast consultations between the superpowers in almost a decade, U.S. and Soviet experts will meet Tuesday in Vienna to exchange views on the Iran-Iraq war, Lebanon and the Arab-Israeli dispute, the State Department announced Wednesday.
NEWS
February 6, 1988 | From Reuters
U.S. envoy Richard W. Murphy arrived in London on Friday for talks with British Foreign Secretary Geoffrey Howe on ways to revive the Middle East peace process, the Foreign Office said.
NEWS
December 4, 1985 | From Reuters
U.S. special Mideast envoy Richard W. Murphy met Tuesday with Saudi Arabia's foreign minister, Prince Saud al Faisal, the official Saudi Press Agency reported.
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