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Richard W Riley

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NEWS
October 19, 1994 | Associated Press
Education Secretary Richard W. Riley is recovering from prostate cancer surgery that went smoothly Tuesday, a hospital spokesman said.
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NEWS
August 31, 1999 | Associated Press
Education Secretary Richard W. Riley began a five-day, five-state bus trip Monday to visit schools in the South. "The South has made enormous strides in education, and we have economic prosperity to show for it," Riley told a cheering crowd gathered at the airport here. Riley, whose first-time bus tour is to include a stop in South Carolina, where he once was governor, said the South has emerged as a national trendsetter. "Many more children are in Head Start.
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NEWS
August 31, 1999 | Associated Press
Education Secretary Richard W. Riley began a five-day, five-state bus trip Monday to visit schools in the South. "The South has made enormous strides in education, and we have economic prosperity to show for it," Riley told a cheering crowd gathered at the airport here. Riley, whose first-time bus tour is to include a stop in South Carolina, where he once was governor, said the South has emerged as a national trendsetter. "Many more children are in Head Start.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of University of Virginia students packed a lecture hall last spring to hear the secretary of Education hold forth on a front-line issue in American politics: school reform. They grilled him on everything from curriculum and teacher tenure to testing. And at every turn, the bespectacled, grandfatherly Richard W. Riley responded with a measured drawl and a benign smile that took self-effacement to new levels.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The son of Richard W. Riley, the former South Carolina governor named by President-elect Bill Clinton to oversee political appointments for the new Administration, was arrested Wednesday on federal cocaine and marijuana distribution charges. Richard W. Riley Jr., 33, was indicted Tuesday with 18 others in Greenville, S.C., by a federal grand jury on charges of distributing cocaine and marijuana and conspiring to possess the illicit drugs with the intent to distribute them.
NEWS
September 8, 1994
Believing that parental involvement is a weak link in education today, Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley launched a campaign Wednesday to get the whole family involved in helping children learn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The kids at Heninger Elementary School have a leg up, the U.S. secretary of education told them Friday: They speak a second language. But, Secretary Richard W. Riley told them, good reading skills will be the key to their success. "Reading is something you have to do every day," Riley told a gathering of more than 50 students, teachers, parents and school officials. "You don't get a good job without it. It improves your education, but it's also fun."
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In naming Richard W. Riley as personnel director for his transition team, President-elect Bill Clinton draws on the talents of someone much like himself: a centrist Southern Democrat who was the first person to win two terms as governor of South Carolina by tempering his instincts as a reformer with an ability to compromise. Indeed, for many years the political careers of the two governors proceeded along remarkably parallel tracks.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two weeks after starting his new job as education secretary, Richard W. Riley is learning he inherited a department that is much more cash-strapped than he realized. "I come in here with all the spirit of excitement to try to get education rolling, and it looks like it would be an enormous accomplishment to get enough money to break even," Riley said Wednesday. "You caught me at a time of frustration."
NEWS
January 13, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton's nominee for education secretary urged Congress on Tuesday to join him in the "essential mission" of reshaping the nation's approach to education to assure that all Americans are prepared for the changing world economy. "Giving our students the best education in the world is a moral imperative and, especially, an economic necessity," former South Carolina Gov. Richard W. Riley, 59, told the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.
NEWS
February 17, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Asserting that improving the public schools depends on elevating teaching to a "first-class profession," U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley on Tuesday called on states to base teachers' pay on their skills and to create a three-tier licensing system similar to that in place for doctors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998
Second-graders at International Elementary School in Long Beach were prepared for U.S. Education Secretary Richard Riley's visit. They had been coached not to look back when the lights blinked from the hordes of news cameras present. Riley, who is spending nearly a week in California to discuss President Clinton's education initiatives, walked into one of the campus' portable classrooms Thursday with Long Beach Mayor Beverly O'Neill to read a book to the 15 students seated on the floor.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Education Secretary Richard W. Riley on Tuesday launched the Clinton administration's counterattack on GOP lawmakers' education proposals, calling taxpayer-funded "vouchers" for private education a "fad" that would benefit a few and leave most students behind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The kids at Heninger Elementary School have a leg up, the U.S. secretary of education told them Friday: They speak a second language. But, Secretary Richard W. Riley told them, good reading skills will be the key to their success. "Reading is something you have to do every day," Riley told a gathering of more than 50 students, teachers, parents and school officials. "You don't get a good job without it. It improves your education, but it's also fun."
NEWS
October 19, 1994 | Associated Press
Education Secretary Richard W. Riley is recovering from prostate cancer surgery that went smoothly Tuesday, a hospital spokesman said.
NEWS
September 8, 1994
Believing that parental involvement is a weak link in education today, Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley launched a campaign Wednesday to get the whole family involved in helping children learn.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waggling his finger and glaring angrily, President-elect Bill Clinton lashed out Monday at "bean counters" who have criticized his Cabinet selections as short on women and minorities, saying that they are "playing quota games and math games" and ignoring his non-Cabinet appointments. "I think I'm doing a good job," Clinton said, adding that his Cabinet selection process "has a lot of integrity."
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Outlining the Clinton Administration's vision for overhauling American public schools, Education Secretary Richard W. Riley on Saturday promised a new era of federal cooperation with state and local school officials. "If there is any single flaw in the school reform movement," Riley told a convention of the National School Boards Assn., "it is the tendency to push some people out, to assume that reform is driven from the top down, by national experts. I think otherwise."
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Outlining the Clinton Administration's vision for overhauling American public schools, Education Secretary Richard W. Riley on Saturday promised a new era of federal cooperation with state and local school officials. "If there is any single flaw in the school reform movement," Riley told a convention of the National School Boards Assn., "it is the tendency to push some people out, to assume that reform is driven from the top down, by national experts. I think otherwise."
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two weeks after starting his new job as education secretary, Richard W. Riley is learning he inherited a department that is much more cash-strapped than he realized. "I come in here with all the spirit of excitement to try to get education rolling, and it looks like it would be an enormous accomplishment to get enough money to break even," Riley said Wednesday. "You caught me at a time of frustration."
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