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Richard Wagner

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By David Ng
A classical music event in Israel is expected to break the country's taboo on performing the music of Richard Wagner, the 19th century German composer and a well-known anti-Semite. The Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported this week that the event, scheduled for June 18, will feature orchestral musicians performing selections from Wagner's "Der Ring des Nibelungen" and other operas. The event will be an academic symposium at Tel Aviv University devoted to Wagner, conductor Arturo Toscanini and Theodor Herzl, the famed Zionist leader.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By David Ng
Richard Wagner -- the 19th century composer whose epic operas are considered to be among the greatest ever written and whose anti-Semitic views still cause controversy -- was born 200 years ago Wednesday in Leipzig, Germany. The composer's bicentennial birthday is being marked around the world with special performances and broadcasts. In Los Angeles, radio station KUSC (91.5 FM) is devoting its morning show, running 6 to 9 a.m., to the composer's life and music. New York radio station WQXR will broadcast an hourlong program devoted to Wagner starting at 4 p.m. PDT on its website . The BBC is  also offering a slate of Wagner-themed programming this week that can be heard online.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010
'Wolves' owes debt to 'Arrow' William Royce in his letter of last week ("Feedback," Feb. 7) correctly points out that "Avatar" owes a lot, narratively speaking, to "Dances With Wolves." But "Dances With Wolves" is itself a complete rip-off of Samuel Fuller's vivid, raw, altogether masterful 1957 western "Run of the Arrow." I don't inherently mind similar stories being retold, but I do wish that filmmakers would at least acknowledge the originals. Jeremy Arnold Los Angeles Wrong man on a pedestal That was quite a tribute to Martin Scorsese ("Mean Straits," Feb. 7)
WORLD
May 19, 2013 | By Jeevan Vasagar
BERLIN - Family archives belonging to a descendant of the composer Richard Wagner are expected to be passed to the German government soon, opening access to researchers who have long sought to shed light on their links to the Nazi regime. With the 200th anniversary of Wagner's birth coming Wednesday, the composer's great-granddaughter, Katharina Wagner, pledged the “prompt” release of family letters. He was born May 22, 1813. Although the contents of the letters are unknown, their release raises the prospect of revelations about the degree to which the Wagners admired and colluded with the Nazis.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2007 | George Jahn, Associated Press
A real-life drama of succession as riveting as any Richard Wagner opera is casting a shadow over this year's Bayreuth Festival, raising the anticipation level among devotees of the German master even before the first curtain rises Wednesday at the musical shrine he inaugurated 131 years ago.
NEWS
July 19, 1999 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One night in the early 1960s when Gottfried Wagner was a teenager, he crept up to a monumental bust of his great-grandfather, Richard Wagner, in a park in the village of Bayreuth, a sleepy Bavarian hamlet transformed every summer by the annual Wagner festival into a pilgrimage destination for opera lovers from around the world. But for young Wagner, his famous ancestor represented something besides the soul-stirring music that has enraptured listeners for 150 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan
Los Angeles TimesFilm Critic Once upon a time, Richard Wagner dreamed a mighty dream. The composer envisioned a series of four operas so ambitious they dealt with nothing less than the creation and destruction of the world. And he dreamed of doing things - like having singers swimming underwater and riding through the clouds on winged horses - that were frankly impossible to stage. That did not, however, stop people from trying, both then and now. "Wagner's Dream,"an engaging new documentary directed by Susan Froemke, details the most recent attempt to put on a new version of the 19th century Ring cycle, considered, one insider says, "the peak of the mountain" for any opera company.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1987
In the "Tristan und Isolde" ad (above), doesn't Richard Wagner deserve billing at least as large as those three midgets? ROGER E. GOULET Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Wolfgang Wagner, the longtime director of the annual festival of Richard Wagner's operas in Bayreuth, Germany, said in a letter issued Tuesday that he would step down after leading the event for nearly six decades. The letter from the 88-year-old Wagner -- grandson of composer Richard Wagner, who founded the festival in 1872 -- was read to reporters by his lawyer after a meeting of the festival's board of directors. The directors had no immediate comment on the status of a possible replacement for Wagner, although his daughters have handed in a proposal for their joint directorship.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2008 | From the Associated Press
As Germany's annual Bayreuth Festival moves toward its conclusion this week, the real drama is unfolding behind the scenes over a successor to 89-year-old director Wolfgang Wagner. The furor increased Monday with news that Nike Wagner, the great-granddaughter of the composer Richard Wagner, had teamed with Belgian director Gerard Mortier to apply for the job. Nike's bid rivals an earlier bid by two of her cousins -- the daughters of current director Wolfgang Wagner. Richard Wagner founded the festival in 1872 and his grandsons, Wolfgang and Wieland, took charge of the festival in 1951.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The composer Richard Wagner, born 200 years ago this spring, believed (with justification) that he represented the music of the future. Los Angeles likes to think (with justification?) that it represents the city of the future. The two should be made for each other, and in the short history of Los Angeles Opera, they have been. No company in America can match so interesting and original a string of Wagner productions over the past quarter-century as those at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, beginning with David Hockney's gorgeous designs for "Tristan und Isolde" in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan
Los Angeles TimesFilm Critic Once upon a time, Richard Wagner dreamed a mighty dream. The composer envisioned a series of four operas so ambitious they dealt with nothing less than the creation and destruction of the world. And he dreamed of doing things - like having singers swimming underwater and riding through the clouds on winged horses - that were frankly impossible to stage. That did not, however, stop people from trying, both then and now. "Wagner's Dream,"an engaging new documentary directed by Susan Froemke, details the most recent attempt to put on a new version of the 19th century Ring cycle, considered, one insider says, "the peak of the mountain" for any opera company.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By David Ng
A classical music event in Israel is expected to break the country's taboo on performing the music of Richard Wagner, the 19th century German composer and a well-known anti-Semite. The Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported this week that the event, scheduled for June 18, will feature orchestral musicians performing selections from Wagner's "Der Ring des Nibelungen" and other operas. The event will be an academic symposium at Tel Aviv University devoted to Wagner, conductor Arturo Toscanini and Theodor Herzl, the famed Zionist leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2012 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Since its founding in 2003, Jacaranda has proved itself one of the best and most adventurous chamber music series in the country. Based at the First Presbyterian Church in Santa Monica, Jacaranda offers a mix of new and old, with an emphasis on West Coast composers. (This season the group - whose motto is "Music at the Edge" - has put on pieces by Nico Muhly, Philip Glass and Toru Takemitsu, and it will close out its season in May with a minimalist piece by Terry Riley and a Lou Harrison work, arranged from gamelan for string orchestra.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2010
Like a superhero after a bad beat-down, the Broadway musical starring Spider-Man has dusted itself off and is fighting back against perhaps its greatest nemesis ? its own complications. After the first preview performance Sunday, in which "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark" had to be halted five times because of technical glitches, two subsequent shows have each been stopped only once. "We've worked out 80% of our bugs," says lead producer Michael Cohl. "We're way ahead of the game.
OPINION
June 26, 2010 | Patt Morrison
The "Ring" is vorbei — the great Los Angeles Wagner marathon ends tonight. It is Los Angeles' first full "Ring of Nibelung" cycle, that zenith of song and stagecraft and music for opera lovers, and it requires devotion and fortitude of the sort perfected by people sometimes referred to a bit rudely as "Ring nuts." People like Eleanor Gnup. She spent 17 years as the librarian at Brea Olinda High School, where a student told her about the opera appreciation class that changed her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Plans by the Israel Philharmonic to play works by composer Richard Wagner ran into a new hurdle when a council decided to poll subscribers. The orchestra raised an outcry last week when it decided to break a 53-year-old ban on scheduled performances by the German composer. Wagner died before the Nazis came to power in Germany, but Adolf Hitler admired Wagner's anti-Semitic writings and ordered Wagner played at Nazi functions.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra gave its promised performance of music by Richard Wagner but sought to forestall protests by treating the event as a rehearsal. There was an outcry nonetheless that Israel's premier orchestra had broken its 53-year-old taboo on performing works by the German composer, a favorite of Hitler. But the protests, like the concert, were delivered in a minor key.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2010 | By Jon Burlingame, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Max Steiner, the pioneering film composer who wrote the music for "King Kong" and "Gone With the Wind," was once complimented as the man who invented modern movie music. "Nonsense," he replied. "The idea originated with Richard Wagner. Listen to the incidental scoring behind the recitatives in his operas. If Wagner had lived in this century, he would have been the No. 1 film composer." That last point is debatable. (Try to imagine Wagner working for Harvey Weinstein.) But Wagner's influence on film-music history certainly has been enormous, "probably more than any other single composer," says Roger Hickman, professor of music at California State University Long Beach and author of "Reel Music: Exploring 100 Years of Film Music."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2010
EVENTS Janie Bryant The costume designer for AMC's "Mad Men" will join fashion journalist Monica Corcoran Harel and Matthew Weiner (creator of "Mad Men") to discuss the creative process and inside stories behind one of TV's most stylishly influential series, with a fashion show and reception to follow. LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd. 7:30 pm. $60. (323) 857-6010. www.lacma.org. MUSIC Karen Elson Jack White's red-tressed better half steps up to the mike with material from her first album, "The Ghost Who Walks."
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