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Richard Walch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1998
Richard Walch, the executive director of the 23,000 member Los Angeles County Bar Assn., was unanimously voted president of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Thursday. The city commission, created by voters in 1990, regulates city ethics, lobbying and campaign finance laws. Walch has served on the commission since 199 and was named vice president in July 1997. "I intend to lead the commission in the tradition of openness and public service established by my predecessors," Walch said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1998
Richard Walch, the executive director of the 23,000 member Los Angeles County Bar Assn., was unanimously voted president of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Thursday. The city commission, created by voters in 1990, regulates city ethics, lobbying and campaign finance laws. Walch has served on the commission since 199 and was named vice president in July 1997. "I intend to lead the commission in the tradition of openness and public service established by my predecessors," Walch said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1997
A former journalist who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1950 was elected president of the city's Ethics Commission on Friday under a new system allowing commissioners to pick their own leader rather than leaving that power to the mayor. Edwin Guthman, who has served on the panel six years, has written or edited three books, two of them about Robert F. Kennedy. He is currently a professor of journalism at USC and lives in Pacific Palisades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000
Citing the public's need to know, top city Ethics Commission officials called Tuesday for tough financial disclosure requirements for those involved in drives to break up the city. Disclosure of who is financing petition drives for cityhood and who is lobbying for and against pending proposals should be mandatory, said Chairwoman Miriam Krinsky and Vice Chairman Richard Walch of the ethics panel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A ban on political contributions from businesses to city officials who award them contracts would not be effective, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission was told Thursday. Instead, businesses might be required to disclose political contributions when they bid for city work, Rebecca Avila, the executive director, told commission members. Avila said a ban would be ineffective because it would not stop employees of city contractors from giving to elected officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1999 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Ethics Commission approved settlements Monday calling for fines totally $13,700 against three city councilmen who accepted campaign contributions exceeding the city limit. The fines given City Council President John Ferraro and Councilmen Mike Hernandez and Mark Ridley-Thomas are the first levied by the Ethics Commission under the campaign contribution limits established in 1985.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Due to "an anomaly" in California's campaign laws, the group pushing for a study and possible vote on San Fernando Valley secession is not required to disclose finances, expenditures or contributors--but it could be, according to a report by the city's Ethics Commission. The report offers no recommendations on whether secession group Valley VOTE should be made to reveal its financial backers. However, it concludes that Los Angeles leaders have the power to force disclosure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to make elections more competitive, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Monday moved to double matching funds for candidates and allow them to raise matchable funds earlier. The new rules could further level the playing field between well-financed incumbents and challengers by significantly increasing the amount of city money given to candidates. Challengers rely heavily on small contributions from individuals instead of large donations from corporations and political action committees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN and PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A day after laying out their vision of a new city in the San Fernando Valley, activists complained Wednesday that Los Angeles officials are obstructing the state-mandated fiscal study of the proposed breakup. The secession group Valley VOTE also hammered the Los Angeles City Council for adopting an elaborate system Wednesday to screen each request for city data needed for the study. John M. Walker, a Valley VOTE board member, said it would "take forever" to get information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing the public's need to know, top Los Angeles Ethics Commission officials called Tuesday for tough new financial disclosure requirements for those involved in drives to break up the city. Rules mandating disclosure of who is financing petition drives for cityhood and who is lobbying for and against pending proposals should be adopted, Chairwoman Miriam Krinsky and Vice Chairman Richard Walch of the ethics panel said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to make city elections more competitive, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Monday moved to double matching funds and lengthen the time during which contributions can be matched. The new rules could further level the playing field between well-financed incumbents and challengers by significantly increasing the amount of city money given to candidates who rely heavily on small contributions from individuals instead of large donations from corporations and political action committees.
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