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Richard Waters

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SPORTS
December 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Denny McLain might want to take back some of what he said about his racketeering and drug case in his autobiography, "Strikeout," but the publisher of the book is not listening. "His book didn't sell worth a damn." Richard Waters, president and chief executive officer of The Sporting News, said Friday after hearing that McLain had been ordered by a judge to change the book. "You think a revision would help? "I haven't heard from him and didn't know the judge asked him to do that.
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SPORTS
December 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Denny McLain might want to take back some of what he said about his racketeering and drug case in his autobiography, "Strikeout," but the publisher of the book is not listening. "His book didn't sell worth a damn." Richard Waters, president and chief executive officer of The Sporting News, said Friday after hearing that McLain had been ordered by a judge to change the book. "You think a revision would help? "I haven't heard from him and didn't know the judge asked him to do that.
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NEWS
August 29, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
Encouraged by the success of a pilot program to combat graffiti in the Los Angeles Police Department's Wilshire Division, city officials plan to step up enforcement of an ordinance requiring merchants to lock up spray paint cans and markers. The sale of spray paint to minors is prohibited, but some youths steal spray paint cans and markers from open store shelves, said City Atty. James K. Hahn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1987 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Jonathan Glasier pedaled Arthur Frick's beepmobile out onto F Street, and instantly attracted the attention of passers-by who gawked at the soft-spoken music theorist astride the wild contraption. The beepmobile is an industrial-strength red tricycle, outfitted with a choir of battery-powered Maserati horns and a huge, fuzzy cornucopia-like bell, that resonates when the driver blows into one of two handy garden hoses. They are fitted with mouthpieces, one for a French horn, the other for a tuba.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1988 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
A new central library will cost the City of San Diego $78.9 million--not including land acquisition, parking and financing costs--if planners can move quickly enough to complete arrangements by 1992, a report forwarded to the City Council this week shows. The 1992 estimate is $29.7 million more than a 1986 prediction made by the same consulting team, a hefty price increase that is primarily due to inflated construction costs caused by project delays.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The cliche that music is a universal language, a language of unity, always rings hollow, and never more than in wartime. There is, in fact, no language more divisive, and not just between cultures. It separates parents and children. Neighbors and colleagues often cannot communicate through it. Symphony audiences fight over what language their orchestra should speak. CD mega-stores are islands of genres. This newspaper, like others, separates pop and classical music into separate departments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1988 | DIANE CALKINS, Diane Calkins is a San Diego free-lance writer
None of us who actually use San Diego's central library (unlike the members of the City Council who don't even have library cards) were surprised when out-of-town consultant Richard Waters announced recently: "I would stand before God, flag and anyone else and say that if you look at the 10 major cities in the U.S., San Diego is physically the worst library in the United States." Coincidentally, I read his statements shortly after returning from my most recent trip to the library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1996 | MARY F. POLS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a bad night to be a library consultant. About 100 city leaders, library employees and community activists--all intimately familiar with the subject--crowded into a meeting room at the Oxnard Hilton on Thursday night to grill a team of consultants on their 140-page report on the future of Ventura County's library system.
SPORTS
March 30, 1986 | WARREN MAYES, United Press International
The Sporting News has survived five wars, the Great Depression and the onslaught of television and it celebrated its 100th birthday on March 17. But the Bible of Baseball, as it is known, doesn't plan to stand pat over the next century, and is instituting changes aimed at making it the Bible of Sports. "It is unique," said Tom Barnidge, news editor of the sports weekly.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1991 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"My Own Private Idaho" is another chapter in Gus Van Sant's own private cinema. No matter what you've been used to, "Idaho" is something completely different, a film that manages to confound all expectations, even the ones it sets up itself. Puckish, understated and almost defiantly idiosyncratic, "Idaho" (at selected theaters) is weaker on plot than writer-director Van Sant's last film, the critically beloved "Drugstore Cowboy."
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