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Richard Wigton

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BUSINESS
August 8, 1987 | Associated Press
Kidder, Peabody & Co. denied reports Friday that a suspended senior employee accused in a major insider trading probe has been reinstated, but the firm said it has resumed paying his salary and legal bills. In what it called a "clarification statement," Kidder said press accounts concerning a change in the status of Richard B. Wigton were inaccurate.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 1987 | Associated Press
Kidder, Peabody & Co. denied reports Friday that a suspended senior employee accused in a major insider trading probe has been reinstated, but the firm said it has resumed paying his salary and legal bills. In what it called a "clarification statement," Kidder said press accounts concerning a change in the status of Richard B. Wigton were inaccurate.
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NEWS
February 13, 1987 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD and TONY ROBINSON, Times Staff Writers
In a significant expansion of one of Wall Street's worst scandals, federal prosecutors Thursday arrested and charged three prominent figures in the investment community with criminal violations of laws against trading stock on inside information. The U.S. attorney's office filed complaints against Robert M. Freeman, a partner at Goldman Sachs & Co.; Richard Wigton, a vice president at Kidder Peabody & Co., and Timothy L. Tabor, a former vice president of Kidder.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD and TONY ROBINSON, Times Staff Writers
In a significant expansion of one of Wall Street's worst scandals, federal prosecutors Thursday arrested and charged three prominent figures in the investment community with criminal violations of laws against trading stock on inside information. The U.S. attorney's office filed complaints against Robert M. Freeman, a partner at Goldman Sachs & Co.; Richard Wigton, a vice president at Kidder Peabody & Co., and Timothy L. Tabor, a former vice president of Kidder.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1987
U.S. District Judge Shirley Wohl Kram denied the motion that accused prosecutors of improperly leaking secret grand jury information to the press. She said defense lawyers failed to prove that the U.S. attorney's office violated a federal rule that generally forbids disclosure of matters before a grand jury. The case involves three Wall Street professionals who were indicted April 9 but who at present do not face criminal charges: Robert M. Freeman, a partner at Goldman, Sachs & Co.; Richard B.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | Associated Press
A Wall Street merger specialist believed to be a key informant in the government's insider trading investigation tearfully pleaded guilty today to illegal stock trading conspiracy and tax evasion. In addition to entering the pleas in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, Martin A. Siegel, who was an executive with Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc., settled a non-criminal complaint alleging that he engaged in insider trading with stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Federal prosecutors filed charges today against three high-level Wall Street executives, alleging they illegally traded stock on inside information. The U.S. attorney's office released complaints leveling the charges against Timothy L. Tabor and Richard Wigton, both vice presidents of Kidder, Peabody, and Robert M. Freeman, a partner at Goldman, Sachs & Co.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
A leading Wall Street executive today said he will plead guilty to one criminal charge of insider trading after a two-year investigation that he said made his life "a nightmare." Robert Freeman, who was arrested in his office, Feb. 11, 1987, said in a resignation letter to Goldman, Sachs & Co. officials that he "never conspired . . . to swap inside information" and called the charges he originally faced "totally false."
BUSINESS
May 18, 1987 | From Reuters
The head of the criminal investigation of Wall Street's insider trading scandal Sunday denied that a government request last week to dismiss charges against three men suggests any weakening in its case. In a television interview, Rudolph W. Giuliani, U.S. attorney for Manhattan, said the government motion to dismiss charges against the three indicted Wall Street professionals was made to allow prosecutors time to expand the charges against them.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for three accused Wall Street insider-traders will have until Monday to respond to the federal government's motion to dismiss the case against their clients, it developed Thursday. In an extraordinary move designed to buy time for a further grand jury investigation, prosecutors on Wednesday had asked a federal judge here to dismiss a 5-week-old indictment against the traders. The case was due to come to trial next Wednesday, and the prosecutors had conceded that they risked losing it.
NEWS
February 14, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY and PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writers
The latest round of insider trading charges has added new momentum to demands for tougher regulation of Wall Street and may bring particular focus on the mysterious and complex field of risk arbitrage, lawmakers and regulators agreed Friday. "Right now, it is far too easy for market manipulators to make a quick killing by putting a company into play and cashing in on the rise of the price of its stock," said Sen. William Proxmire (D-Wis.), chairman of the Senate Banking Committee.
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