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Richard Williams

SPORTS
September 2, 2004 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Two Compton women made noise Wednesday at the U.S. Open. On the grand stage at Arthur Ashe Stadium Court, Serena Williams played tennis in micro mini shorts and had to send a runner to the locker room to fetch her purse. Why? Williams had forgotten her earrings in her purse. "I really believe in accessorizing," said Williams, who has talked far more about clothes than tennis this week and who conquered Lindsay Lee-Waters in a second-round match, 6-4, 6-3.
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SPORTS
September 11, 1999 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father almost knew best. Richard Williams was close, so close to realizing the fulfillment of his prediction, an all-Williams teen final at the U.S. Open. What got in the way was an 18-year-old pony-tailed Swiss baseliner with a deceptive smile, the grin of a fiendish competitor. Martina Hingis had to listen to the talk, all Williams, all the time, for almost a fortnight.
SPORTS
July 5, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was someone who kept Venus Williams from reaching her goals and achieving her dreams, and, no, it wasn't the excitable, feisty teen in the household with a U.S. Open championship. Serena Williams, 15 months younger, may have given her older sister grief by making some close line calls in their pre-bead kid days and made life more difficult by winning the family's first Grand Slam singles title.
SPORTS
June 27, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY
Virginia Wade--"Our Ginny," as the local tabloids proudly referred to her--won the women's singles title at Wimbledon in 1977. Queen Elizabeth watched from the royal box. She hasn't been back since. Nor has any British player--man or woman--been back for a singles final on Center Court. The closest was the late Fred Perry.
SPORTS
July 7, 2000 | VALERIE GUTIERREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a neatly lined tennis court in Compton, 8-year-old Mandi Jenkins hit a forehand, then, her braids swinging and her expression serious, she waited for her father to hit the ball back. They were practicing on the same court--at what is now East Rancho Dominguez Park--where famed tennis sisters Serena and Venus Williams once practiced amid broken glass, gangs and violence.
SPORTS
September 9, 1997 | JULIE CART
How in the world did Venus Williams go from promising young player to lightning rod for racism? How did it happen that what should have been the 17-year-old's day of triumph--even in defeat--in Sunday's U.S. Open final, would be more about recrimination than celebration?
SPORTS
September 7, 1997 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the two youngest finalists to vie for a Grand Slam title in the Open era. They are two of the most confident teenagers anyone is likely to meet. Martina Hingis, the 16-year-old No. 1, will have to get through 17-year-old Venus Williams, who demonstrated Friday that she backs down to no one. That point was made clear in Williams' semifinal match against Irina Spirlea. In that thrilling three-set match, Spirlea and Williams collided as they walked to their chairs during a changeover.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
A State Department official told reporters here Tuesday that he has presented his credentials as the first U.S. ambassador to the Mongolian People's Republic. "At this time, when the political tides of the world are shifting, it's a very hopeful sign that we're able to do this with Mongolia," said the appointee, Richard Williams, who heads the State Department's Office of Chinese and Mongolian Affairs.
SPORTS
March 31, 2003 | Mal Florence
Richard Williams says he will resume flashing his homemade signs exhorting daughters Serena and Venus at their tennis matches. "It's inspirational to fans and I actually think it helps the tournament," he told the Miami Herald. "Tennis needs a lot of help. Clap your hands, tap your feet, blow your horns. "Tennis needs something other than 'Shhhhhhhhh!' " Trivia time: Who holds the record for the highest scoring average in an NBA playoff series?
SPORTS
June 4, 2007 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
With Serena Williams "ready to step up and grab a ... wild bear right now" in the words of her father, Richard, the French Open awaits her bout with an ingenious pipsqueak. The quarterfinal that resembles a final has materialized to lend Tuesday the promise of fracas. Serena Williams, the Australian Open champion seeded No. 8 here, will play No. 1 Justine Henin, the twice-defending French champion, for the first time on clay since 2003, when Henin, seeded No. 4 , upended Williams, then No.
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