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Richard Williams

SPORTS
December 29, 1997 | LISA DILLMAN
What: TennisMatch magazine. Price: $2.95. Competition is good . . . off the court too. For years, Tennis magazine has ruled the industry with a grip about as formidable as Pete Sampras' hold on No. 1. But with a recent redesign and a shift in content, a pledge for additional stories about the athletes, TennisMatch is worthy of examination. The results, judging from the December/January issue, are promising. Small bits of information are scattered throughout the magazine.
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SPORTS
September 2, 2004 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Two Compton women made noise Wednesday at the U.S. Open. On the grand stage at Arthur Ashe Stadium Court, Serena Williams played tennis in micro mini shorts and had to send a runner to the locker room to fetch her purse. Why? Williams had forgotten her earrings in her purse. "I really believe in accessorizing," said Williams, who has talked far more about clothes than tennis this week and who conquered Lindsay Lee-Waters in a second-round match, 6-4, 6-3.
SPORTS
July 5, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
WIMBLEDON, England -- Serena Williams served her first ace in the first game of her Wimbledon semifinal match Thursday against second-seeded Victoria Azarenka. It was up the middle, and it raised a dust ball on Centre Court. And it was a trend-setter. By the time Williams' 6-3, 7-6 (6) victory over Azarenka was complete, Williams had served 24 aces. That broke the Wimbledon record that Williams had set last week against Zheng Jie by one. And Williams played three sets against Zheng.
SPORTS
September 11, 1999 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father almost knew best. Richard Williams was close, so close to realizing the fulfillment of his prediction, an all-Williams teen final at the U.S. Open. What got in the way was an 18-year-old pony-tailed Swiss baseliner with a deceptive smile, the grin of a fiendish competitor. Martina Hingis had to listen to the talk, all Williams, all the time, for almost a fortnight.
SPORTS
July 5, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was someone who kept Venus Williams from reaching her goals and achieving her dreams, and, no, it wasn't the excitable, feisty teen in the household with a U.S. Open championship. Serena Williams, 15 months younger, may have given her older sister grief by making some close line calls in their pre-bead kid days and made life more difficult by winning the family's first Grand Slam singles title.
SPORTS
June 27, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY
Virginia Wade--"Our Ginny," as the local tabloids proudly referred to her--won the women's singles title at Wimbledon in 1977. Queen Elizabeth watched from the royal box. She hasn't been back since. Nor has any British player--man or woman--been back for a singles final on Center Court. The closest was the late Fred Perry.
SPORTS
July 7, 2000 | VALERIE GUTIERREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a neatly lined tennis court in Compton, 8-year-old Mandi Jenkins hit a forehand, then, her braids swinging and her expression serious, she waited for her father to hit the ball back. They were practicing on the same court--at what is now East Rancho Dominguez Park--where famed tennis sisters Serena and Venus Williams once practiced amid broken glass, gangs and violence.
SPORTS
September 9, 1997 | JULIE CART
How in the world did Venus Williams go from promising young player to lightning rod for racism? How did it happen that what should have been the 17-year-old's day of triumph--even in defeat--in Sunday's U.S. Open final, would be more about recrimination than celebration?
SPORTS
September 7, 1997 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the two youngest finalists to vie for a Grand Slam title in the Open era. They are two of the most confident teenagers anyone is likely to meet. Martina Hingis, the 16-year-old No. 1, will have to get through 17-year-old Venus Williams, who demonstrated Friday that she backs down to no one. That point was made clear in Williams' semifinal match against Irina Spirlea. In that thrilling three-set match, Spirlea and Williams collided as they walked to their chairs during a changeover.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
A State Department official told reporters here Tuesday that he has presented his credentials as the first U.S. ambassador to the Mongolian People's Republic. "At this time, when the political tides of the world are shifting, it's a very hopeful sign that we're able to do this with Mongolia," said the appointee, Richard Williams, who heads the State Department's Office of Chinese and Mongolian Affairs.
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