Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Wright
IN THE NEWS

Richard Wright

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 25, 1988 | JACQUELINE TRESCOTT, The Washington Post
This is the Mississippi of William Faulkner and Eudora Welty, of Margaret Walker and Richard Wright. Here for nearly two decades Walker, now 73, has been wrestling with a biography of Wright, whose "Native Son" and "Black Boy," published in the 1940s, were the nation's first best-selling novels by a black writer and landmarks in the literature of social protest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
February 17, 2008 | Lynell George, Lynell George is a Times staff writer.
JUST months before his death in Paris in late 1960, Richard Wright was still wrestling with the same demons: class, politics, religion and racism. His last reflections -- 360 pages found in a binder -- make up "A Father's Law," a previously unpublished novel now out to mark the centennial of the author's birth.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1986 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
The actors on location in the old Highland Park Police Station sit at the witness table with heads down, arms locked over their ears. Oprah Winfrey, fresh from her Oscar-nominated portrayal of Sofia in "The Color Purple," and Victor Love are playing mother and son in the remake of Richard Wright's powerful, brutal and tautly written novel "Native Son," and they're seeking silence. For the moment they happen to be alone, waiting for other actors to troop in.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their English teachers have been saying it all along: Words really can come to life in books. But it took an actor performing a one-man play based on excerpts from Richard Wright's anguished autobiographical novel "Black Boy" to prove it Wednesday to 100 teenagers at the Los Angeles Central Library. Actor Michael Phillip Edwards portrayed Wright, whose sense of alienation generated a book that gave voice to other blacks living in the segregated South in the 1920s and '30s.
BOOKS
February 17, 2008 | Lynell George, Lynell George is a Times staff writer.
JUST months before his death in Paris in late 1960, Richard Wright was still wrestling with the same demons: class, politics, religion and racism. His last reflections -- 360 pages found in a binder -- make up "A Father's Law," a previously unpublished novel now out to mark the centennial of the author's birth.
BOOKS
February 19, 1989 | Charles R. Johnson, Johnson is director of the Creative Writing Program at the University of Washington. His m ost recent book is "Being and Race: Black Writing Since 1970." and
"The further we stand in aesthetic distance from Richard Wright, the greater his intellectual achievement appears," writes novelist Margaret Walker in "Daemonic Genius," a "psychohistory" that breaks her 21-year self-imposed silence about an Afro-American author so central to 20th-Century literature that, "he marks a clear line of demarcation in black fiction writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1995 | Karen Grigsby Bates, Karen Grigsby Bates writes often on race and culture for The Times' Op - Ed pages. and
I was in Paris, waiting to be admitted to Polidor, a no-reservations, family- style restaurant on rue Maitre-le- Prince. Polidor's prices were reason able, the simple food good and the portions generous, so its clientele (neighborhood regulars, penny-pinching students from the nearby Sorbonne and tourists, like me, who wanted to mix with the locals) was large and the line long.
BOOKS
August 22, 1999 | Richard Wright
O black rattlesnake, Why in all hell did you choose This path to sleep in? From "Haiku: This Other World" by Richard Wright (Arcade: 304 pp., $23.50).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1986 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Julia Wright--the elder of Richard Wright's two daughters--attended the premiere of "Native Son" in New York recently and found the treatment of her father's seminal 1940 novel "honest." Wright, 44, who is putting together a book of her late father's unpublished haiku poetry, lives in Paris. "I think you should know the frame of mind I traveled to New York with," she remarked in a telephone interview.
BOOKS
August 22, 1999 | Richard Wright
O black rattlesnake, Why in all hell did you choose This path to sleep in? From "Haiku: This Other World" by Richard Wright (Arcade: 304 pp., $23.50).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS
Near the end of "Wright From America" at the Fountain Theatre in Hollywood, viewers suddenly learn that the show is being narrated not by novelist Richard Wright, as they had been led to believe, but rather by his ghost. The twist makes a fitting metaphor, because Willard Simms' nearly incoherent play is certainly dead onstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1995 | Karen Grigsby Bates, Karen Grigsby Bates writes often on race and culture for The Times' Op - Ed pages. and
I was in Paris, waiting to be admitted to Polidor, a no-reservations, family- style restaurant on rue Maitre-le- Prince. Polidor's prices were reason able, the simple food good and the portions generous, so its clientele (neighborhood regulars, penny-pinching students from the nearby Sorbonne and tourists, like me, who wanted to mix with the locals) was large and the line long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994 | JULIA WRIGHT, Author Richard Wright's gripping autobiography, "Black Boy," about growing up poor and black in the South early in this century split a Ventura County high school honors class early last month into opposing groups . Some parents of the Fillmore High School students objected to what they said are amoral and violent messages in the book and insisted that their ninth- and 10-grade children be given an alternate text. Below, we publish excerpts of a letter Wright's daughter wrote from Paris to the students and parents in response to the uproar.
Thank you for being so alive and sensitive to my father's book that, almost 60 years after it was written, you are heatedly and passionately able to debate its perceived message. Your ability to throw yourselves into the controversy with such gut feelings says as much about the staying power of "Black Boy" as about the state of the society to which this story of childhood and youth has been transmitted through the years.
NEWS
April 4, 1994 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly half a century after it was published, Richard Wright's searing account of growing up poor and black in the segregated South has split a Ventura County high school honors class into two groups. Parents objecting to what they say are amoral and violent messages in "Black Boy" have insisted that their ninth- and 10th-grade children be given an alternate text.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1994 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly half a century after it was first published, Richard Wright's searing account of growing up poor and black in the segregated South has split a Fillmore High School honors class into two groups. Parents objecting to what they say are amoral and violent messages in the 303-page "Black Boy" have insisted that their ninth- and 10th-grade children be given an alternative text.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1990
A former administrator of an Inglewood hospital and two of his sons were sentenced to prison Monday for their roles in a false billing and kickback scheme that defrauded local hospitals and businesses out of millions of dollars. Donald A. Wright Sr., 57, former director of engineering at Daniel Freeman Memorial Hospital, was sentenced to three years in prison, fined $100,000 and ordered to pay $23,799 in restitution to the hospital. Wright's oldest son, Donald Wright Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994 | JULIA WRIGHT, Author Richard Wright's gripping autobiography, "Black Boy," about growing up poor and black in the South early in this century split a Ventura County high school honors class early last month into opposing groups . Some parents of the Fillmore High School students objected to what they said are amoral and violent messages in the book and insisted that their ninth- and 10-grade children be given an alternate text. Below, we publish excerpts of a letter Wright's daughter wrote from Paris to the students and parents in response to the uproar.
Thank you for being so alive and sensitive to my father's book that, almost 60 years after it was written, you are heatedly and passionately able to debate its perceived message. Your ability to throw yourselves into the controversy with such gut feelings says as much about the staying power of "Black Boy" as about the state of the society to which this story of childhood and youth has been transmitted through the years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1990
A former administrator of an Inglewood hospital and two of his sons were sentenced to prison Monday for their roles in a false billing and kickback scheme that defrauded local hospitals and businesses out of millions of dollars. Donald A. Wright Sr., 57, former director of engineering at Daniel Freeman Memorial Hospital, was sentenced to three years in prison, fined $100,000 and ordered to pay $23,799 in restitution to the hospital. Wright's oldest son, Donald Wright Jr.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|