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Richard Wyatt

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal
All it took was one look. The artists behind a vibrant mural depicting community protection of black youth were a mystery to the folks at UCLA. An image of the work, part of the school's archive, would eventually grace university publications, including an edition of the museum's newsletter Fowler Now, but they didn't know who had painted it. That's when Richard Wyatt came upon it. "The winter newsletter came in the mail one day," recounted Wyatt, 54. "And there it was. I was like 'Whoa!
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NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Christopher Reynolds
I never thought Los Angeles needed an avatar, since so many Angelenos have created new identities for themselves already. But last week, by accident, I wound up in the company of two fine L.A. archetypes, both downtown. Seeing them on the same day persuaded me that they're two of my favorite pieces of public art in Los Angeles. Both were made in the last 20 years and both were designed to give this sprawling, many-tongued city a universal female image who transcends ethnicity. If you have an hour free in downtown Los Angeles, you can walk between them (or take a one-stop ride on the Red Line)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
When Los Angeles muralist Richard Wyatt Jr. set out in 1990 to create a gigantic public artwork paying tribute to nearly a dozen great jazz musicians, he was given only two specific requests. "Nat King Cole's widow [Maria] asked me if I would show him wearing his favorite tie," said Wyatt, 57, as he stood next to his recently restored mural at the Capitol Records Tower in Hollywood last week. "And Joe Smith, who was president of Capitol at the time, asked me if I'd please include Ella Fitzgerald," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
When Los Angeles muralist Richard Wyatt Jr. set out in 1990 to create a gigantic public artwork paying tribute to nearly a dozen great jazz musicians, he was given only two specific requests. "Nat King Cole's widow [Maria] asked me if I would show him wearing his favorite tie," said Wyatt, 57, as he stood next to his recently restored mural at the Capitol Records Tower in Hollywood last week. "And Joe Smith, who was president of Capitol at the time, asked me if I'd please include Ella Fitzgerald," he said.
MAGAZINE
January 2, 1994
The "parking lot wall outside the Capitol Records building in Hollywood" (Cityscape, Palm Latitudes, Dec. 5) was painted by a very talented artist, Richard Wyatt, who deserves all the credit he can get. WES CHRISTENSEN Los Angeles
NEWS
May 18, 1989
The Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department has awarded a grant to the Social and Public Art Resource Center for artist honorariums and for administration of a mural restoration program. Artists will receive $500 from the Emergency Relief Fund for Mural Restoration. Recipients are Wallace Cronk, Larry Gruda, Arthur Mortimer, Frank Romero, Ann Thierman, Richard Wyatt, Emily Cordova and Henry Brown III.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"Artists By Artists," an exhibition of portraits of artists by artists, sounds promising but fails to deliver much. Pairing off 14 L.A. artists who were instructed to execute portraits of one other, the show is marked by a surprising lack of imagination; most of the participants went for straight-forward likenesses, none of which resonate with the sense of presence characteristic of a great portrait. Included is an appropriately colorful figurative painting of Sam Francis by Jerry Aistrup, an explosive abstraction by Francis that is labeled as a portrait of Aistrup but looks like standard-issue Sam Francis, and a photo realist rendering of Kent Twitchell by Wes Christiansen.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Christopher Reynolds
I never thought Los Angeles needed an avatar, since so many Angelenos have created new identities for themselves already. But last week, by accident, I wound up in the company of two fine L.A. archetypes, both downtown. Seeing them on the same day persuaded me that they're two of my favorite pieces of public art in Los Angeles. Both were made in the last 20 years and both were designed to give this sprawling, many-tongued city a universal female image who transcends ethnicity. If you have an hour free in downtown Los Angeles, you can walk between them (or take a one-stop ride on the Red Line)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Muralist Richard Wyatt has begun work on "Hollywood Jazz: 1945-1972," a mural depicting jazz greats such as Duke Ellington (who would have been 91 on Sunday), Billie Holiday, Nat (King) Cole, Ella Fitzgerald and Shelly Manne, and the Hollywood nightclubs they played in. The mural will occupy the 88x26-foot south-facing wall of the Capitol Records building on Vine Street, according to Teri Merrill-Aarons, founder/president of the Los Angeles Jazz Society, which sponsored the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard J. Wyatt, 63, chief of the neuropsychiatry branch of the National Institute of Mental Health, died June 7 of lung cancer in Washington, D.C. Born in Los Angeles, Wyatt earned undergraduate and medical degrees at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. He later taught at Stanford, Harvard, Columbia and Duke universities. In 1967, Wyatt began working at the National Institutes of Health as a research psychiatrist. Two years later he founded a schizophrenia research program.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal
All it took was one look. The artists behind a vibrant mural depicting community protection of black youth were a mystery to the folks at UCLA. An image of the work, part of the school's archive, would eventually grace university publications, including an edition of the museum's newsletter Fowler Now, but they didn't know who had painted it. That's when Richard Wyatt came upon it. "The winter newsletter came in the mail one day," recounted Wyatt, 54. "And there it was. I was like 'Whoa!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard J. Wyatt, 63, chief of the neuropsychiatry branch of the National Institute of Mental Health, died June 7 of lung cancer in Washington, D.C. Born in Los Angeles, Wyatt earned undergraduate and medical degrees at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. He later taught at Stanford, Harvard, Columbia and Duke universities. In 1967, Wyatt began working at the National Institutes of Health as a research psychiatrist. Two years later he founded a schizophrenia research program.
MAGAZINE
January 2, 1994
The "parking lot wall outside the Capitol Records building in Hollywood" (Cityscape, Palm Latitudes, Dec. 5) was painted by a very talented artist, Richard Wyatt, who deserves all the credit he can get. WES CHRISTENSEN Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Muralist Richard Wyatt has begun work on "Hollywood Jazz: 1945-1972," a mural depicting jazz greats such as Duke Ellington (who would have been 91 on Sunday), Billie Holiday, Nat (King) Cole, Ella Fitzgerald and Shelly Manne, and the Hollywood nightclubs they played in. The mural will occupy the 88x26-foot south-facing wall of the Capitol Records building on Vine Street, according to Teri Merrill-Aarons, founder/president of the Los Angeles Jazz Society, which sponsored the project.
NEWS
May 18, 1989
The Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department has awarded a grant to the Social and Public Art Resource Center for artist honorariums and for administration of a mural restoration program. Artists will receive $500 from the Emergency Relief Fund for Mural Restoration. Recipients are Wallace Cronk, Larry Gruda, Arthur Mortimer, Frank Romero, Ann Thierman, Richard Wyatt, Emily Cordova and Henry Brown III.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"Artists By Artists," an exhibition of portraits of artists by artists, sounds promising but fails to deliver much. Pairing off 14 L.A. artists who were instructed to execute portraits of one other, the show is marked by a surprising lack of imagination; most of the participants went for straight-forward likenesses, none of which resonate with the sense of presence characteristic of a great portrait. Included is an appropriately colorful figurative painting of Sam Francis by Jerry Aistrup, an explosive abstraction by Francis that is labeled as a portrait of Aistrup but looks like standard-issue Sam Francis, and a photo realist rendering of Kent Twitchell by Wes Christiansen.
MAGAZINE
September 11, 1994 | Joy Horowitz, Joy Horowitz is a frequent contributor to The Times. Her last article for the magazine was "A Dramatic Remedy," about drama therapy for the mentally ill
At 8:43 a.m. March 28, 1991, two UCLA campus police officers responding to an emergency call found a burly young man lying face down outside of Boelter Hall. He had jumped from the roof of the nine-story classroom building; at 9:23 he was pronounced dead at UCLA Medical Center. His name was Tony Lamadrid. A coroner's report included this notation: "This 23-year-old male with a history of depression and schizophrenia was being treated for same at UCLA Medical Center Psychiatric Department . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Nine local artists were named Wednesday to paint the first murals for a revitalized city-funded mural program called Neighborhood Pride: Great Walls Unlimited. Those chosen to create the grand-scale artworks throughout Los Angeles are: Richard Wyatt, Roberto Delgado, Roderick Sykes, Wayne Healy, Wallace Cronk, Guillermo Ceniceros, Frank Romero, Yreina Cervantez and Karen Kitchell. The Social and Public Arts Resource Center in Venice is administering the mural program.
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