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NEWS
November 12, 1992
Richard Yates, 66, best known for his 1961 novel, "Revolutionary Road," about a disillusioned Connecticut couple. Yates also wrote the novels "A Special Providence," "Disturbing the Peace," "The Easter Parade" and "Cold Spring Harbor." He also wrote two short story collections, "11 Kinds of Loneliness," and "Liars in Love." A former speech writer for Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy, Yates had been working for many years on a novel about Washington during the John F.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
In his new biography, "Farther and Wilder: The Lost Weekends and Literary Dreams of Charles Jackson," Blake Bailey explores the tormented life of the author of "The Lost Weekend" - the once-celebrated 1944 novel that led to the Oscar-winning film - and his plunge into literary obscurity. The Portsmouth, Va.-based biographer has also written extensive books about John Cheever, winning a National Book Critics Circle Award, and of Richard Yates, for which Bailey was a finalist for the honor.
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NEWS
July 9, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
It was the kind of propitious beginning that most young writers can only dream about, and, by all counts, it should have signaled a career of celebrity and honors.
NEWS
November 12, 1992
Richard Yates, 66, best known for his 1961 novel, "Revolutionary Road," about a disillusioned Connecticut couple. Yates also wrote the novels "A Special Providence," "Disturbing the Peace," "The Easter Parade" and "Cold Spring Harbor." He also wrote two short story collections, "11 Kinds of Loneliness," and "Liars in Love." A former speech writer for Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy, Yates had been working for many years on a novel about Washington during the John F.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
FRIENDS IN HIGH PLACES The Bechtel Story: The Most Secret Corporation and How It Engineered the World by Laton McCartney (Ballantine Books: $8.95) The Bechtel Group, a San Francisco-based engineering and construction firm, can be credited with building major pipelines for Standard Oil and Continental Gas in the 1920s, the Hoover Dam in Boulder, Colo., in the 1930s and possibly half the nuclear power plants in the world. In "Friends in High Places," a remarkable work of investigative reporting, Laton McCartney lays bare the inner machinations that made Bechtel such a paradigm of power: its politic interactions with the White House and the CIA. The group's close relations with the White House have been in the limelight under the previous administrations, particularly in the figures of George Shultz (Bechtel's president since 1975)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
In his new biography, "Farther and Wilder: The Lost Weekends and Literary Dreams of Charles Jackson," Blake Bailey explores the tormented life of the author of "The Lost Weekend" - the once-celebrated 1944 novel that led to the Oscar-winning film - and his plunge into literary obscurity. The Portsmouth, Va.-based biographer has also written extensive books about John Cheever, winning a National Book Critics Circle Award, and of Richard Yates, for which Bailey was a finalist for the honor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio have graduated from icebergs to the suburbs. The stars who played ill-fated lovers in 1997's "Titanic" are reuniting for DreamWorks' "Revolutionary Road," to be directed by Winslet's husband, Sam Mendes. The film is inspired by Richard Yates' lauded 1961 novel about a well-off but disillusioned Connecticut couple who try to fulfill their artistic longings by moving to France.
NEWS
December 3, 2008 | Susan King
Thomas Newman, the eight-time Oscar-nominated composer, is a double threat this year with memorable scores for Pixar's animated blockbuster "Wall-E" and Sam Mendes' latest drama, "Revolutionary Road." The Mendes film is based on the acclaimed 1961 novel by Richard Yates about a troubled young married couple in 1955 and reunites "Titanic" stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT
When he was 36, author Richard Yates wrote a novel, "Revolutionary Road," which was lavishly lauded by playwright Tennessee Williams. In the decades since then, Yates has consistently produced books that have been critically praised but commercially unrewarding. His themes have never been upbeat, and he has supported himself and his family largely on fees from teaching creative writing classes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2006 | CASEY DOLAN
Turning the spotlight on musicians making a commercial breakthrough. -- CASEY DOLAN "Chris Young" Chris Young RCA Nashville Artist info: Chris Young has a voice with an impressive range extending from a rich baritone hum to a quicksilver-lined falsetto. He's a contender in the time-honored barroom ballad club of country music with his first single "Drinkin' Me Lonely."
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
It was the kind of propitious beginning that most young writers can only dream about, and, by all counts, it should have signaled a career of celebrity and honors.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
FRIENDS IN HIGH PLACES The Bechtel Story: The Most Secret Corporation and How It Engineered the World by Laton McCartney (Ballantine Books: $8.95) The Bechtel Group, a San Francisco-based engineering and construction firm, can be credited with building major pipelines for Standard Oil and Continental Gas in the 1920s, the Hoover Dam in Boulder, Colo., in the 1930s and possibly half the nuclear power plants in the world. In "Friends in High Places," a remarkable work of investigative reporting, Laton McCartney lays bare the inner machinations that made Bechtel such a paradigm of power: its politic interactions with the White House and the CIA. The group's close relations with the White House have been in the limelight under the previous administrations, particularly in the figures of George Shultz (Bechtel's president since 1975)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2009 | Susan King
Superhero films are proving to be more than just popcorn escapism this award season. "The Dark Knight" earned a nomination Monday for the Producers Guild of America's top prize. And on Tuesday, "Iron Man," 2008's other superhero box-office champ, received a nomination for the USC Libraries 21st Annual Scripter Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010
The American Book Review has taken stock of literature and come up with its Top 40 Bad Books. The list targets some big, popular favorites -- F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic "The Great Gatsby," Richard Yates' "Revolutionary Road," the James Bond novel "Casino Royale" by Ian Fleming and Cormac McCarthy's "All the Pretty Horses." Really? If they're the worst, what's the best? Most books were selected by university professors. On the one hand, these are some of America's best-read people, so we should be able to trust their analyses.
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