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NEWS
March 20, 1988 | KATHERINE M. GRIFFIN, Times Staff Writer
The water at Richardson Bay was as still and smooth as a sheet of green glass one recent morning, but Larry Moyer, who has lived on houseboats here for nearly 20 years, says that when storms pass through, the bay can become a pretty rough place to live. During those years, frequent political storms also have buffeted this small bay a few miles north of San Francisco.
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NEWS
March 20, 1988 | KATHERINE M. GRIFFIN, Times Staff Writer
The water at Richardson Bay was as still and smooth as a sheet of green glass one recent morning, but Larry Moyer, who has lived on houseboats here for nearly 20 years, says that when storms pass through, the bay can become a pretty rough place to live. During those years, frequent political storms also have buffeted this small bay a few miles north of San Francisco.
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NEWS
August 21, 1985
The verdict is in on an annoying, mysterious hum that has plagued houseboat dwellers in Richardson Bay near Sausalito for years--the noise is coming from amorous fish, marine biologists say. Frank J. Hubach, an acoustical engineer who headed the research into the hum, said that spectrograms from a tape recording made in 1977 of the plainfin midshipmen matched up exactly with the noises heard every summer in Richardson Bay. The fish earlier had been identified as suspects in the case.
NEWS
August 21, 1985
The verdict is in on an annoying, mysterious hum that has plagued houseboat dwellers in Richardson Bay near Sausalito for years--the noise is coming from amorous fish, marine biologists say. Frank J. Hubach, an acoustical engineer who headed the research into the hum, said that spectrograms from a tape recording made in 1977 of the plainfin midshipmen matched up exactly with the noises heard every summer in Richardson Bay. The fish earlier had been identified as suspects in the case.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | Associated Press
The attorney for houseboaters who live in a motley fleet off Sausalito said he has just begun to fight a Marin County law that prohibits living aboard vessels without permits. "We lost the skirmish, but we'll win the war," attorney Martin Jarvis said Thursday. Jarvis, who represents the Mariners of Richardson Bay, said he will appeal U.S. District Judge William Schwarzer's dismissal of the boat dwellers' suit that sought to invalidate the ordinance and win $30 million in damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Unauthorized floating homes will remain anchored on the Sausalito waterfront. The San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission, which regulates bay waters, chose Thursday not to adopt a plan to remove the floating homes in Richardson Bay off Sausalito. The decision was made after a group of outraged mariners heaped scorn on the commissioners and pledged to fight for their right to continue what they say is the historic practice of dropping anchor wherever their hearts desire.
NEWS
August 21, 1985 | Associated Press
The verdict is in on an annoying, mysterious hum that has plagued houseboat dwellers in Richardson Bay near here for years----the noise is coming from amourous fish, marine biologists say. Frank J. Hubach, an acoustical engineer who headed the research into the hum, said Monday that spectrograms from a tape recording made in 1977 of the plainfin midshipmen matched up exactly with the noises heard every summer in Richardson Bay. The fish earlier had been identified as suspects in the case.
NEWS
April 13, 1986
I would like to clarify a statement that was attributed to me in Ruth Snyder's article on March 10 concerning houseboats ("Houseboat Community Struggles to Stay Afloat"). The quote in question reads as follows: ". . . The ideal solution would be to phase out the liveaboards--these people are more trouble than they're worth." It is "anchor-outs" that are more trouble than they are worth. Let me explain the difference. When referring to marine structures that serve as primary residences in Richardson Bay, Marin County and the Bay Conservation and Development Commission (upon which I sit as a commissioner)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1997
The snowy egret, found in marshy areas of coastal Orange County, shuffles its feet along in the water to stir up food. The egret, actually a small white heron, is easy to spot with its pure white feathers, the plume on top of its head and its yellow feet known as "golden slippers." The Marin Audubon Society prints two artistic black-and-white environmental posters, one of wildlife in a salt marsh, the habitat favored by the snowy egret, the other of pond life.
NEWS
August 8, 1985 | SAUL RUBIN, Times Staff Writer
Donna Michel first heard the mysterious sound last year as she was drifting off to sleep in a lower-level bedroom of her houseboat. The eerie humming "clicked on" in the early evening, peaked in volume around midnight, and finally went away in the morning--a pattern that would be repeated all summer. "At first I thought it was a transitory type of thing," Michel said one recent afternoon. "Then when it didn't go away, my husband and I started to ask ourselves: 'Are we going crazy?'
NEWS
June 26, 1989 | VALARIE BASHEDA, Times Staff Writer
The constant loud, droning sounds not only kept houseboat-living Sausalitans awake at night--it was also driving them crazy. But once the mystery of the engine-like sound was solved, Sausalitans decided to welcome the culprits--bulging-eyed, bubble-lipped humming toadfish that swim in Richardson Bay--with an annual Humming Toadfish Festival. On Sunday afternoon, the bay town threw its second annual celebration for the toadfish, celebrating with revelers costumed as sea monsters and clowns and prancing horses and dancing fish--and all playing lustily on kazoos.
NEWS
March 10, 1986 | RUTH SNYDER, Snyder, a student at San Francisco State University, is an intern in The Times' San Francisco bureau. and
Dudley Lewis used wood from a rotting pier and copper fastenings from an old power line to build his seaworthy home. Lewis, a part-time writer and journeyman machinist and carpenter, lives on his boat, one in the ramshackle collection of mostly rebuilt, refurbished old boats on the Sausalito waterfront. Skimming the Bay Lewis' days are spent skimming the bay or working on his vessel, a replica of the New Jersey oyster scow that Joshua Slocum sailed around the world in 1893.
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