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July 28, 2002 | MICHAEL PARRISH
ALONG THE RICHARDSON HIGHWAY, Alaska--At least a dozen people died in the winter of 1913 along the old Valdez-Fairbanks Trail, lost in churning blizzards as they struggled to find Yost's Roadhouse. The two-story log lodge in the central Alaska Range was often so buried in snow that only its stovepipe poked above the drifts. Yost's was 200 yards back from the trail, making it even harder to find in a storm. The summer after that deadly season, a Lt. Dougherty of the U.S.
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February 7, 2014 | By Paresh Dave, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Ah, the open road: The lone highway into Valdez, Alaska, is finally clear, but residents say being cut off by land wasn't that big of a deal. Six miles of the Richardson Highway in and out of the town of 4,000 people were shut down for about 11 days because of multiple avalanches that dropped snow 50 feet high onto the lanes. Truck shipments and other travel were shifted to ships and airplanes. "Alaska is resilient," said Valdez resident Colleen Stephens. Although it reduced the town's independence, she said, "Did it really alter how we live our daily lives?
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NATIONAL
April 15, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Officials have recovered the body of a 9-year-old boy who died over the weekend after crashing his snowmobile through a glacier in Alaska. Shjon Brown's body was recovered around 12:40 a.m. on Monday, Alaska State Troopers spokeswoman Megan Peters said in an email to reporters. Shjon of Fairbanks apparently died in the accident when his vehicle fell down a 200-foot hole while he was snowmobiling with his father on Saturday in the Hoodoo Mountains off the Richardson Highway between Delta Junction and Glennallen.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
With an estimated 50 feet of snow blocking the only highway into town, the 4,000 residents of Valdez, Alaska, will be cut off indefinitely, officials say, leaving access only by air or by sea. As many as a dozen avalanches came down on the 360-mile Richardson Highway to Fairbanks on Friday, officials said, including one that dammed a river and created a lake up to half a mile long across the road. The highway cannot be cleared until water behind the snow drains, state transportation officials say. “At this time, there is no safe way to approach relieving that water,” Jason Sakalaskas, a maintenance engineer, said at a news teleconference Monday, according to the Associated Press . The avalanches came in an area known locally as Snow Slide Path, said Mike Coffey, another maintenance engineer for the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities.
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February 7, 2014 | By Paresh Dave, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Ah, the open road: The lone highway into Valdez, Alaska, is finally clear, but residents say being cut off by land wasn't that big of a deal. Six miles of the Richardson Highway in and out of the town of 4,000 people were shut down for about 11 days because of multiple avalanches that dropped snow 50 feet high onto the lanes. Truck shipments and other travel were shifted to ships and airplanes. "Alaska is resilient," said Valdez resident Colleen Stephens. Although it reduced the town's independence, she said, "Did it really alter how we live our daily lives?
NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
With an estimated 50 feet of snow blocking the only highway into town, the 4,000 residents of Valdez, Alaska, will be cut off indefinitely, officials say, leaving access only by air or by sea. As many as a dozen avalanches came down on the 360-mile Richardson Highway to Fairbanks on Friday, officials said, including one that dammed a river and created a lake up to half a mile long across the road. The highway cannot be cleared until water behind the snow drains, state transportation officials say. “At this time, there is no safe way to approach relieving that water,” Jason Sakalaskas, a maintenance engineer, said at a news teleconference Monday, according to the Associated Press . The avalanches came in an area known locally as Snow Slide Path, said Mike Coffey, another maintenance engineer for the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities.
TRAVEL
August 11, 2002
What a surprise to see my Uncle Bud's Sourdough Roadhouse on the cover of the Travel section ("Finding Gold Rush Tales and Roadhouse Comforts on the Richardson Highway," July 28). Elstun "Bud" Lauesen owned it in the 1970s and 1980s. One of the lasting memories from my visit to the roadhouse was the "Caribou Clatters" radio message service, which was how they knew that I was arriving from Los Angeles and whether to meet me at the airport in Fairbanks or Valdez. BONNIE LAUESEN HODGE San Dimas
NATIONAL
November 4, 2002 | From Associated Press
A major earthquake rocked a sparsely populated area of interior Alaska early Sunday afternoon, damaging supports to the trans-Alaska oil pipeline and opening 6-foot cracks in highways and roads. The magnitude 7.9 quake, centered 90 miles south of Fairbanks, was strongly felt in Anchorage, about 270 miles to the south. It hit at 1:13 p.m. Alaska Standard Time, said Bruce Turner of the West Coast & Alaska Tsunami Warning Center in Palmer.
TRAVEL
December 12, 2010 | By Jay Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Along the Richardson Highway in the Alaskan interior, "towns" — and that's being generous — often spring up for a single purpose: to provide food, water and, of course, fuel to passing motorists. Mosquito Junction was once such a wayside. But that was before the handful of residents decided to incorporate and name their frigid outpost North Pole. Now the streetlights and fire hydrants are striped like candy canes. Santa Claus, naturally, is in residence year-round at the holiday-themed gift shop bearing his name.
TRAVEL
June 13, 2004 | David E. Gilbert, Special to The Times
From our well-earned vantage point atop a granite outcropping 2,000 feet above Alaska's glacial passages, we looked down to our flotel, the floating hotel that had become a refuge from the howling wilderness. Soon we would be warming our aching muscles in the topside whirlpool -- an impeccable conclusion to a day of hiking along the Inside Passage. My wife and I had heard an Alaskan cruise was only for "the newly wed or nearly dead."
NATIONAL
April 15, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Officials have recovered the body of a 9-year-old boy who died over the weekend after crashing his snowmobile through a glacier in Alaska. Shjon Brown's body was recovered around 12:40 a.m. on Monday, Alaska State Troopers spokeswoman Megan Peters said in an email to reporters. Shjon of Fairbanks apparently died in the accident when his vehicle fell down a 200-foot hole while he was snowmobiling with his father on Saturday in the Hoodoo Mountains off the Richardson Highway between Delta Junction and Glennallen.
TRAVEL
July 28, 2002 | MICHAEL PARRISH
ALONG THE RICHARDSON HIGHWAY, Alaska--At least a dozen people died in the winter of 1913 along the old Valdez-Fairbanks Trail, lost in churning blizzards as they struggled to find Yost's Roadhouse. The two-story log lodge in the central Alaska Range was often so buried in snow that only its stovepipe poked above the drifts. Yost's was 200 yards back from the trail, making it even harder to find in a storm. The summer after that deadly season, a Lt. Dougherty of the U.S.
TRAVEL
July 23, 2006 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
HEADS are nodding, bodies are limp, soft snoring sounds are escaping from the throat of the man across the aisle from me. Later, he will describe this drive -- 11 hours on a bus -- as "the ride from hell." It's not. It's just infernally boring. We're trapped in a motor coach heading north on an Alaskan Adventure Tour, seven days and nights that will take us from Anchorage to Fairbanks to Denali National Park, site of North America's highest peak, 20,320-foot-tall Mt. McKinley.
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