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Richardson Vicks Inc

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BUSINESS
December 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
One hundred years after a pharmacist mixed the first batch of Magic Croup Salve, later renamed Vicks VapoRub, mothers are still tucking sick children into bed with a smear of the gooey, aromatic concoction. One of America's most enduring cold remedies, Vicks VapoRub still comes in the same distinctive blue jar and still unclogs millions of stuffed noses with its unmistakable vapors.
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BUSINESS
December 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
One hundred years after a pharmacist mixed the first batch of Magic Croup Salve, later renamed Vicks VapoRub, mothers are still tucking sick children into bed with a smear of the gooey, aromatic concoction. One of America's most enduring cold remedies, Vicks VapoRub still comes in the same distinctive blue jar and still unclogs millions of stuffed noses with its unmistakable vapors.
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BUSINESS
September 26, 1985
Members of the founding family of Richardson-Vicks Inc., maker of Vicks anti-cold remedies, reported that they have raised their stake in the company to help fight off a takeover attempt by Unilever. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the family said it now owns 36.2% of the firm, or 6.4 million common shares. Before the battle with Unilever, the Richardsons were thought to control about 7.3% of the company's stock.
NEWS
September 27, 1986 | United Press International
The Procter & Gamble Co. said Friday it plans to sell the South African operating unit of its Richardson-Vicks Inc. subsidiary because of "the unequal treatment of human beings" in South Africa.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
One hundred years after a pharmacist mixed the first batch of Magic Croup Salve, later renamed Vicks VapoRub, mothers are still tucking sick children into bed with a smear of the gooey, aromatic concoction. One of America's most enduring cold remedies, Vicks VapoRub still comes in the same distinctive blue jar and still unclogs millions of stuffed noses with its unmistakable vapors.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1985 | DANIEL AKST, Times Staff Writer
Vidal Sassoon Inc. will lay off between 100 and 125 workers in Los Angeles by Nov. 6 in a move that Wall Street analysts described as symptomatic of sharply lower sales at the hair-care company. Richardson-Vicks Inc., the Wilton, Conn., conglomerate that bought Sassoon two years ago, said most of the layoffs will be in Chatsworth, where the company will end most distribution and warehouse functions but retain research and development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1985 | DANIEL AKST, Times Staff Writer
Vidal Sassoon Inc. will lay off 100 to 125 workers in Los Angeles by Nov. 6 in a move that Wall Street analysts described as symptomatic of sharply lower sales at the hair-care company. Richardson-Vicks Inc., the Wilton, Conn., conglomerate that bought Sassoon two years ago, said most of the layoffs will be in Chatsworth, where the company will end most distribution and warehouse functions but retain research and development.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1985 | Associated Press
Richardson-Vicks Inc. on Tuesday rejected a sweetened merger offer from the U.S. subsidiary of Unilever and responded with a series of steps designed to thwart the hostile takeover bid. The moves included the distribution of a new, special preferred stock and "certain actions to ensure the continuity of management, employee job security and protection of employee benefits," the company said in a statement. Spokeswoman Deborah Bennetts declined to specify the other measures taken.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1985 | Associated Press
The U.S. subsidiary of Unilever said Thursday that it is raising to $60 per share its top offer for all of the common stock of Richardson-Vicks Inc., whose management has opposed the takeover bid. Unilever U.S. Inc., a unit of the giant Anglo-Dutch consumer products company, said it was boosting its previous top offer from $56 a share provided that the offer was approved by the Richardson-Vicks board.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1987 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Consumer products giant Procter & Gamble on Thursday announced an $800-million, companywide restructuring that calls for consolidating and closing factories that make similar products. The company will set up an $800-million reserve to cover the cost of the restructuring, which has already begun, and charge off the amount against fourth-quarter earnings.
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