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Richie Havens

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OPINION
April 24, 2013
Re "Singer became Woodstock's opening act," Obituary, April 23 As someone who truly worked and sang out for peace, freedom, equality and a clean environment, it is appropriate and should always be remembered that Richie Havens passed away on Earth Day. Jerry Rubin Santa Monica ALSO: Letters: Feeding the soul Letters: Try driving smarter Letters: Don't forget the Texas blast
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OPINION
April 24, 2013
Re "Texas town keeps the faith," April 22 Every time I turn on the news, there's coverage of the Boston bombings. As important as this story is, I am dismayed that so little is being discussed about the explosion at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas. Fourteen people were killed, 12 of them first responders. The town was devastated. One reason this should take precedence is the lack of government inspections that were done on this facility. How could a fertilizer plant, a home to volatile combustible chemicals, be under such poor oversight?
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
People who experienced Woodstock through the lens of the 1970 documentary film "Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music" can describe every contour of Richie Havens' face. With focused eyes and a scraggly beard, the singer, songwriter, guitarist and activist, who died on Monday at age 72, is ingrained into a generation's memory. In the film and on record, you can hear the mantra that he offered echo across Max Yasgur's farm, and that message has resonated over the years to become one of Woodstock's archetypal performances.
OPINION
April 24, 2013
Re "Singer became Woodstock's opening act," Obituary, April 23 As someone who truly worked and sang out for peace, freedom, equality and a clean environment, it is appropriate and should always be remembered that Richie Havens passed away on Earth Day. Jerry Rubin Santa Monica ALSO: Letters: Feeding the soul Letters: Try driving smarter Letters: Don't forget the Texas blast
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | Times staff and wire reports
Richie Havens, the veteran folk singer whose frenetic guitar strumming and impassioned vocals made him one of the defining voices and faces of Woodstock and 1960s pop music, died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Jersey City, N.J. He was 72. His death was confirmed by his booking agent, Tim Drake. The Brooklyn native with the powerful ripsaw voice galvanized rock fans as the opening act at Woodstock, the festival billed as "Three Days of Peace and Music" in upstate New York in August 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1990 | KENNETH BEST, STAMFORD ADVOCATE
Trying to keep up with Richie Havens has never been an easy task. Best known for his mystical performance as the first performer on the stage at the Woodstock Music & Art Festival in 1969 and a series of solo albums, Havens has always been a man in motion. Havens has spent the last couple of weeks singing, traveling and working on several of his environmental and educational projects. "I went from New York to Prague in two days," he said over the telephone from his New York office.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The enduring image of Richie Havens performing "Freedom" at Woodstock is a potent vision of music's capacity for spirituality. Hunched over and drenched in sweat as he grasped his guitar, Havens danced in rapturous, reflexive motion, completely absorbed by sound and emotion. The performance, captured forever on film, was one of the festival's defining, most unforgettable moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Philip Woo, the Chinese-American keyboard player for the soul band Maze, has assembled Patti LaBelle, Richie Havens and Ashford and Simpson to make a video about the Tian An Men Square massacre. The video will be released June 4--the first anniversary of the brutal crackdown on the pro-democracy movement in China--and proceeds from the video and record will go toward paying for a monument in Washington, a traveling exhibition of photographs and a tour by exiled students.
OPINION
April 24, 2013
Re "Texas town keeps the faith," April 22 Every time I turn on the news, there's coverage of the Boston bombings. As important as this story is, I am dismayed that so little is being discussed about the explosion at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas. Fourteen people were killed, 12 of them first responders. The town was devastated. One reason this should take precedence is the lack of government inspections that were done on this facility. How could a fertilizer plant, a home to volatile combustible chemicals, be under such poor oversight?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you've lost track of Richie Havens since Woodstock, you can't have been paying attention. Fact is, he currently is being heard as much as at anytime during his career: His voice is echoing through television ads on behalf of Amtrak ("there's something about a train . . . ") and various corporate entities.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
People who experienced Woodstock through the lens of the 1970 documentary film "Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music" can describe every contour of Richie Havens' face. With focused eyes and a scraggly beard, the singer, songwriter, guitarist and activist, who died on Monday at age 72, is ingrained into a generation's memory. In the film and on record, you can hear the mantra that he offered echo across Max Yasgur's farm, and that message has resonated over the years to become one of Woodstock's archetypal performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Richie Havens, the veteran folk singer whose frenetic guitar strumming and impassioned vocals made him one of the defining voices and faces of Woodstock, and by extension, of 1960s pop music, died Monday of a heart attack at his home in New Jersey, his publicist said in a statement. He was 72. The Brooklyn native with the powerhouse ripsaw voice was the opening act at the festival billed as “Three Days of Peace and Music” in upstate New York in August 1969, and galvanized rock fans as they trekked in to the festival site from across the Eastern Seaboard and throughout the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | Times staff and wire reports
Richie Havens, the veteran folk singer whose frenetic guitar strumming and impassioned vocals made him one of the defining voices and faces of Woodstock and 1960s pop music, died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Jersey City, N.J. He was 72. His death was confirmed by his booking agent, Tim Drake. The Brooklyn native with the powerful ripsaw voice galvanized rock fans as the opening act at Woodstock, the festival billed as "Three Days of Peace and Music" in upstate New York in August 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you've lost track of Richie Havens since Woodstock, you can't have been paying attention. Fact is, he currently is being heard as much as at anytime during his career: His voice is echoing through television ads on behalf of Amtrak ("there's something about a train . . . ") and various corporate entities.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The enduring image of Richie Havens performing "Freedom" at Woodstock is a potent vision of music's capacity for spirituality. Hunched over and drenched in sweat as he grasped his guitar, Havens danced in rapturous, reflexive motion, completely absorbed by sound and emotion. The performance, captured forever on film, was one of the festival's defining, most unforgettable moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1991
Congratulations on your informative and interesting interview with Wambaugh. I admire him greatly, both as a writer and a man. After reading the interview, it seemed quite obvious to me that Wambaugh would be the ideal choice to replace Gates. What we need are fewer Marines and more blue knights. JENNIE DOUGLAS Long Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richie Havens, the folk singer who grew up a street kid in Brooklyn and later founded an East Coast-based environmental education program for urban children, on Wednesday planted the seeds for a West Coast branch of his Natural Guard. At a Glendora press conference attended by Havens, U.S. Forest Service officials and environmental educators, the Angeles National Forest was singled out as one of the first places the seeds will probably grow here.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1991
Congratulations on your informative and interesting interview with Wambaugh. I admire him greatly, both as a writer and a man. After reading the interview, it seemed quite obvious to me that Wambaugh would be the ideal choice to replace Gates. What we need are fewer Marines and more blue knights. JENNIE DOUGLAS Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1990 | KENNETH BEST, STAMFORD ADVOCATE
Trying to keep up with Richie Havens has never been an easy task. Best known for his mystical performance as the first performer on the stage at the Woodstock Music & Art Festival in 1969 and a series of solo albums, Havens has always been a man in motion. Havens has spent the last couple of weeks singing, traveling and working on several of his environmental and educational projects. "I went from New York to Prague in two days," he said over the telephone from his New York office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richie Havens, the folk singer who grew up a street kid in Brooklyn and later founded an East Coast-based environmental education program for urban children, on Wednesday planted the seeds for a West Coast branch of his Natural Guard. At a Glendora press conference attended by Havens, U.S. Forest Service officials and environmental educators, the Angeles National Forest was singled out as one of the first places the seeds will probably grow here.
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