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February 25, 1993 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everybody knew about it, said Dean and Mary Simpson. It was openly discussed. The Richmond public schools wanted to keep white parents happy. Whites had been fleeing in droves since a federal court ordered the schools to desegregate in 1970. To lure them back, school officials offered special treatment. Mary Simpson describes how they did it.
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NEWS
February 25, 1993 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everybody knew about it, said Dean and Mary Simpson. It was openly discussed. The Richmond public schools wanted to keep white parents happy. Whites had been fleeing in droves since a federal court ordered the schools to desegregate in 1970. To lure them back, school officials offered special treatment. Mary Simpson describes how they did it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Cry Wolf" is a clever teen thriller with intricate plotting, deft characterizations, sharp ensemble performances and a darkly ironic twist at the end. It marks the feature debut of its co-writer and director Jeff Wadlow, winner of the first Chrysler Million Dollar Film Festival competition, which enabled him to make this movie, written with his producer Beau Bauman, a fellow graduate of USC's School of Cinema-Television.
NEWS
February 26, 1998
William E. Lloyd, 87, a Pasadena area civic leader, educator and publications manager for Cal State Los Angeles. Lloyd taught administration, developed information services for news media and edited campus publications at Cal State L.A. from 1959 until his retirement in 1977. Educated at the University of Virginia, Lloyd was a high school teacher and coach and a newspaper reporter and editor in Virginia before serving as a Navy communications officer toward the end of World War II.
BOOKS
June 11, 2006 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
HARPER LEE is the Greta Garbo of novelists. Since her last interview in March 1964, the 79-year-old author has been sighted mostly at the First Methodist Church in her hometown of Monroeville, Ala., or perhaps on East 82nd Street in Manhattan, where she lives for part of the year. Her only novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird," however, needs no publicist or writer to keep it alive.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2002 | Megan K. Stack and Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writers
ASPEN HILL, Md. -- Alfred Love woke up to the clatter of his telephone -- and a sick sense of deja vu. His neighbor had news: another sniper attack in Montgomery County, this one right at the foot of the hill. By daybreak their apartment complex was hemmed with police tape. Love couldn't get to work; when his niece told him flatly she was too afraid to go to school, he didn't have the heart to force her. "It started here, and now it's back," he said glumly.
NEWS
April 22, 1985 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
Dale Sampson shuddered with a familiar fear as she stood recently beside the common grave site where her husband and three other anti-Ku Klux Klan demonstrators lie, victims of a hail of gunfire from a band of klansmen and Nazis in 1979.
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