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Richter Scale

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NEWS
July 8, 1988
The Times no longer reports earthquake magnitudes as readings on the Richter scale. Magnitude readings now issued by seismologists more often represent composites drawn from a number of earthquake measurements, of which the Richter scale is one. The Richter scale, developed by the late Caltech seismologist Charles Richter in 1935, was designed to measure the size of an earthquake at its epicenter.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 2007 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
An offbeat a cappella group composed mostly of computer geeks, the Richter Scales have performed original ditties and pop parodies in relative obscurity for seven years. That is, until three weeks ago, when they released an online video that mocks the latest Internet frenzy sweeping Silicon Valley. "Here Comes Another Bubble," an original arrangement of Billy Joel's "We Didn't Start the Fire," pokes fun at the "monster rally all around the valley."
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SPORTS
April 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Derby Trial measured pretty high on this Richter Scale. No. 1, to be exact. Richter Scale took command at the quarter pole and won the milelong Derby Trial by five lengths over favored Trafalger on opening day Saturday at Churchill Downs. Precocity was third, another 1 1/2 lengths back and a nose in front of Partner's Hero. Once again, it appears the Derby Trial will not live up to its name.
HOME & GARDEN
February 9, 2006 | Craig Nakano
IT'S not far from where Linus Pauling discovered how atoms link to form molecules. Or where Charles Richter developed the Richter scale. Or where 17 future Nobel laureates studied (Frank Capra too). But this morning, the red-eared slider turtles at Caltech in Pasadena don't seem all that impressed. All they care about is the sun, warm and bright, shining down on the home they share with crayfish, egrets and a family of mallards.
NEWS
September 22, 1985 | NANCY SKELTON
The Richter scale, the most common way of measuring earthquakes, is a system that tells earthquake scientists how much energy is released by a quake. The scale was developed by U.S. seismologist Charles Richter in 1935, although past records make it possible to use the scale to figure out magnitudes of quakes that occurred as far back as 1906. On the scale, small numerical differences--possibly only a few decimal points--can represent great differences in the severity of an earthquake.
SPORTS
July 13, 1986
Gary Nuhn of the Dayton Journal Herald was wondering what would happen next to plague the U.S. Women's Open golf tournament in suburban Dayton. After a train derailment led to a phosphorous fire and numerous thunderstorms hit the area, Nuhn wrote Friday: " . . . Would you believe swarming locusts? Saturday, how about an earthquake?" Saturday at approximately 4:20 a.m., Ohio was hit by an earthquake registering 4.2 on the Richter scale.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | From Times wire services
A major underground nuclear weapons test rocked the Nevada desert at dawn today, unleashing a shock that measured 5.1 on the Richter scale. Motion from the blast was recorded by monitors atop some high-rise hotel-casinos in Las Vegas, 85 miles from ground zero. Telephone operators at the resorts reported receiving no calls from guests inquiring about the blast. Thirteen protesters turned out at the main entrance to the sprawling desert site and 11 were arrested for trespassing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1988 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
That well-known phrase to Southern Californians, "the quake measured 3.5 on the Richter scale," is fast leaving the vocabulary of seismologists. The Richter scale, synonymous with earthquake measurements for most of this century, is on its way out, although habit may keep it in news reports awhile longer, according to seismologists, geologists and other earthquake experts. It is being replaced by a sort of composite magnitude drawn from a variety of earthquake measurements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1989 | BRENT R. PITMAN, Brent Pitman is a free-lance writer in Capitola, in Santa Cruz County
The connection between misfortune and sin is a tenuous one for most of us, most of the time. But it has been indelibly impressed upon the psyches of most people that the consequence of wrongdoing is punishment--the worst kind of misfortune, since we bring it on ourselves. We know this is true because our parents laid it down thus, and they generally enforced it.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | Associated Press
An earthquake measuring 4.6 on the Richter scale rocked Katmandu Valley early Monday. No damage or injuries were reported.
SPORTS
April 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Derby Trial measured pretty high on this Richter Scale. No. 1, to be exact. Richter Scale took command at the quarter pole and won the milelong Derby Trial by five lengths over favored Trafalger on opening day Saturday at Churchill Downs. Precocity was third, another 1 1/2 lengths back and a nose in front of Partner's Hero. Once again, it appears the Derby Trial will not live up to its name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1996
My wife and I moved to Camarillo from Sherman Oaks almost two years ago, shortly after the Northridge earthquake. Not least among our reasons for choosing Camarillo for our new home was the attractive library, with its good collections and friendly, capable staff. Camarillo residents may not realize the impact the 1994 earthquake had on the libraries in Los Angeles. Ten out of 12 of the libraries in the San Fernando Valley had to be closed and some have yet to reopen. But it does not take an earthquake to destroy a library.
SPORTS
October 30, 1995 | From Associated Press
Goaltender Mike Richter hasn't been at his best in Madison Square Garden this season. So Sunday night's 3-2 victory for the New York Rangers over the Toronto Maple Leafs felt somewhat like a comeback at home. "I was pleased with the way it went," Richter said after making 34 saves, including a game-saver on a breakaway by Doug Gilmour in the second period. "I knew I had to be more stable, not overplay the puck and be more patient. That was really important tonight."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1995 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The earth moved Friday night at the Zellerbach Playhouse. And nothing happened. The cataclysm was supposed to be the central event, both real and symbolic, in an ambitious new opus called "I Was Looking at the Ceiling and Then I Saw the Sky." Call it a work in progress. Call it a work in regress. Call it a mess. Whatever you do, don't call it an opera. Ignore the simple fact that it stubbornly tells its story in music. Don't even call it a pop opera--though that's exactly what it happens to be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1994 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles F. Richter, whose name was once synonymous with Southern California earthquakes, was one of the victims of the Northridge quake, eight years after his death. A fire triggered by the earthquake burned down a Granada Hills home where hundreds of Richter's personal belongings were stored, including books, home movies and diaries kept by the co-inventor of the earthquake measuring system. The home--which belonged to Richter's nephew, Bruce Walport--was destroyed minutes after the Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1994
We in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys have a silver lining to the Jan. 17 earthquake. The proposal by the city and county of Los Angeles to put a 190-million-ton landfill in Elsmere Canyon has been dealt a "10" on the Richter scale. Elsmere Canyon is adjacent to the intersection of the 5 and 14 freeways. For years geologists have warned the landfill proponents that this area--the Newhall Pass--is an area of enormous seismic instability. Hopefully, with this act of God, they will now listen.
NEWS
May 3, 1986 | United Press International
An earthquake measuring 2.5 on the Richter scale rattled a section of Lancaster County in southeastern Pennsylvania on Friday.
NEWS
February 27, 1987 | United Press International
An earthquake measuring 6.2 on the Richter scale struck China's remote western Qinghai province early Thursday, the official New China News Agency said.
SPORTS
January 20, 1994 | JIM MURRAY
Well, my beloved L.A. burst its moorings. Went ape. Tired of being taken for granted. No more Mr. Nice Guy. Time to teach these strangers on the land a lesson. It was more than an earthquake. It was a moral reawakening, a terrible warning, God, or Nature, stepping on the anthill we call the world. Nothing can trivialize human behavior more than a natural catastrophe. This was the real Super Bowl. That other one's just a football game.
MAGAZINE
November 14, 1993 | Patt Morrison
It's not Angeleno to lose our cool. We don't gawk when Julia Roberts trundles down the snooty-vinegar aisle at Pavilions. We don't suck it in when Sly Stallone comes along to work out on the pec-flexer machine next to us. So a few quakelets can hardly undo our aplomb. Wake up, peg them at 3.0, 3.1, check the time and go back to sleep. The same can't be said for the rest of the country: The only casualty of a 5.
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