Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichwood Mutual Water Co
IN THE NEWS

Richwood Mutual Water Co

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
The tiny Hemlock Mutual Water Co. in El Monte discovered seven years ago that its two wells were producing water unfit to drink. So the company's 240 owners--who are also its customers--chipped in $100 apiece toward a $40,000 filtration system, which the board of directors installed as a do-it-yourself project. The equally tiny Richwood Mutual Water Co., also in El Monte, found contamination in its two wells at the same time. But its officials turned to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for help.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
The tiny Hemlock Mutual Water Co. in El Monte discovered seven years ago that its two wells were producing water unfit to drink. So the company's 240 owners--who are also its customers--chipped in $100 apiece toward a $40,000 filtration system, which the board of directors installed as a do-it-yourself project. The equally tiny Richwood Mutual Water Co., also in El Monte, found contamination in its two wells at the same time. But its officials turned to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for help.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 29, 1985
The state Department of Health Services has approved emergency funding to help the Richwood Mutual Water Co. provide service to its 200 customers. Richwood, which last month was ordered to shut off its water supply after it became contaminated, will temporarily connect its customers to the San Gabriel Water Co. The cost of the temporary hookup is estimated at $10,000 to $15,000, a spokeswoman for Assemblywoman Sally Tanner (D-El Monte) said.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
San Gabriel Valley residents would have to help pay for the operation of costly treatment plants to clean up the area's polluted ground water under a newly disclosed state policy. State officials said the state will help the federal government build the plants but has no money to operate them. The U.S.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Under criticism for moving too slowly to clean up polluted ground water in the San Gabriel Valley, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has decided to keep its current contractor on the project to avoid further delays. Daniel W. McGovern, EPA regional administrator, announced in a letter to Rep. Esteban E. Torres (D-La Puente) that the firm CH2M Hill, which has been working on the project since 1983, will be retained.
NEWS
July 25, 1985 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Since 1980, the state has been advising customers of a small water company here to refrain from drinking the water, and now officials say the water is not safe to bathe in, either. In fact, the state has advised Richwood Mutual Water Co. to close one of its two wells and find another source of water. Richwood, which serves about 200 homes near the center of El Monte, is working out an agreement to connect its lines to draw water from the San Gabriel Valley Water Co.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which has come under attack for delays in cleaning up San Gabriel Valley ground water, announced at a congressional subcommittee hearing in Baldwin Park this week a strategy to force polluters to pay for the cleanup. But an agency official conceded that the new plan may not work. The problem, an EPA official said, is that thousands of companies stored and used the kinds of chemicals that have leaked into ground water, and locating the firms responsible for the contamination will not be easy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1988 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Three years ago, when experts tested the first of 90 wells in the San Gabriel Valley that have been tainted by industrial pollution, they found a virtual chemical cocktail. Tests at the well in Irwindale revealed large shots of perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as well as liberal dashes of chloroform, carbon tetrachloride and other substances suspected of being weak carcinogens. Not the kinds of things people want to find in their drinking water.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Three years ago, when experts tested the first of 90 wells in the San Gabriel Valley that have been tainted by industrial pollution, they found a virtual chemical cocktail. Tests at the well in Irwindale revealed large shots of perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as well as liberal dashes of chloroform, carbon tetrachloride and other substances suspected of being weak carcinogens. Not the kinds of things people want to find in their drinking water.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|