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Rick Auerbach

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By Garrett Therolf and Alexandra Zavis
Los Angeles County Assessor Rick Auerbach announced Tuesday that he will retire in March, before the end of his term later this year. "I've been with this office for 39 1/2 years now, been assessor for 10," he said. "I feel it's the right time. I've accomplished a lot of what I wanted to do." Auerbach, 61, asked the county Board of Supervisors to allow his assistant, Robert Quon, to lead the agency until a new assessor is elected in November. Quon has indicated that he will not be a candidate to permanently lead the largest property assessment agency in the nation, with more than 2.3 million real estate parcels, 1,450 employees and a budget of more than $157 million.
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NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Jon Healey
More bad news for embattled Assessor John Noguez: On Monday, authorities arrested a former county appraiser who'd told The Times that he had lowered assessments on numerous properties to try to spur contributions to Noguez's campaign. The arrest of Scott Schenter was the first made in connection with a corruption probe that L.A. County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley launched into the assessor's office last year. Cooley recently called on Noguez to resign "in light of everything that's come out publicly," so it's safe to assume that Schenter's arrest won't be the last word on the investigation.
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OPINION
January 7, 2002
No elected official wants to read criticism in letters to the editor ("Assessing the Assessor Reveals Few Assets," Dec. 29), but this is sometimes how we find that a change in procedures is needed. We are looking into this matter, to improve response time and let taxpayers know that their problems are being addressed as quickly as possible by an agency that oversees 2.3-million properties. One of my initial actions as assessor was to appoint the county's first-ever property owners advocate, an expert with technical and personal skills who helps individuals concerned with the status of their cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2010 | Rong-Gong Lin II
In the first competitive general election for Los Angeles County assessor in a decade, John R. Noguez was leading in early returns. His opponent is John Y. Wong. The job was up for grabs with the retirements this year of Rick Auerbach and his temporary replacement, Robert Quon. The assessor decides the value of property in the county, which helps determine how much the owners pay in property taxes. The nonpartisan role has become particularly important in recent years, as homeowners have sought relief because of falling property values.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2002
"Sellers Market Tightens as Homeowners Won't Let Go" [July 7] pointed out that many homeowners are wary of selling properties with a pre-Proposition 13 assessment and then finding themselves paying higher taxes on a replacement property. That's something to consider. But it should be noted that Proposition 60 (and the lesser-used Proposition 90 involving moving to another county) does allow homeowners 55 or older a one-time purchase that could result in the transfer of a Proposition 13 value from one property to another without an increase in taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2000
County Assessor Rick Auerbach was resting at home Wednesday after suffering a heart attack as he ran a marathon Sunday in San Diego. The recently appointed assessor was running his 57th marathon when he suffered what Assistant Assessor Robert Olson described as a mild heart attack. Auerbach underwent surgery at Scripps Mercy Hospital and single blocked artery was detected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2010 | Rong-Gong Lin II
In the first competitive general election for Los Angeles County assessor in a decade, John R. Noguez was leading in early returns. His opponent is John Y. Wong. The job was up for grabs with the retirements this year of Rick Auerbach and his temporary replacement, Robert Quon. The assessor decides the value of property in the county, which helps determine how much the owners pay in property taxes. The nonpartisan role has become particularly important in recent years, as homeowners have sought relief because of falling property values.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Jon Healey
More bad news for embattled Assessor John Noguez: On Monday, authorities arrested a former county appraiser who'd told The Times that he had lowered assessments on numerous properties to try to spur contributions to Noguez's campaign. The arrest of Scott Schenter was the first made in connection with a corruption probe that L.A. County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley launched into the assessor's office last year. Cooley recently called on Noguez to resign "in light of everything that's come out publicly," so it's safe to assume that Schenter's arrest won't be the last word on the investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2000 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With no primary to winnow the field of 16 to two, the Los Angeles County assessor's race is a cavalry charge of candidates in a mad dash for the $141,000-a-year job. County government insiders see the main contenders as acting Assessor Rick Auerbach, 52, and former Assessor John Lynch, 63, but they quickly point out that in a field so large, any candidate could capture the winner-take-all sprint. "A nobody buried deep in the bureaucracy could win," says one observer. "It's a real crapshoot."
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG and EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It has been 60 years since a district attorney of Los Angeles County was elected to more than two terms. Gil Garcetti could break that streak if he wins reelection to a third term Tuesday--but it's a big if. Garcetti is widely viewed as vulnerable to a challenge from top Deputy Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley, who finished first in a three-way primary election March 7 and has led Garcetti in every poll conducted since then.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By Garrett Therolf and Alexandra Zavis
Los Angeles County Assessor Rick Auerbach announced Tuesday that he will retire in March, before the end of his term later this year. "I've been with this office for 39 1/2 years now, been assessor for 10," he said. "I feel it's the right time. I've accomplished a lot of what I wanted to do." Auerbach, 61, asked the county Board of Supervisors to allow his assistant, Robert Quon, to lead the agency until a new assessor is elected in November. Quon has indicated that he will not be a candidate to permanently lead the largest property assessment agency in the nation, with more than 2.3 million real estate parcels, 1,450 employees and a budget of more than $157 million.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2002
"Sellers Market Tightens as Homeowners Won't Let Go" [July 7] pointed out that many homeowners are wary of selling properties with a pre-Proposition 13 assessment and then finding themselves paying higher taxes on a replacement property. That's something to consider. But it should be noted that Proposition 60 (and the lesser-used Proposition 90 involving moving to another county) does allow homeowners 55 or older a one-time purchase that could result in the transfer of a Proposition 13 value from one property to another without an increase in taxes.
OPINION
January 7, 2002
No elected official wants to read criticism in letters to the editor ("Assessing the Assessor Reveals Few Assets," Dec. 29), but this is sometimes how we find that a change in procedures is needed. We are looking into this matter, to improve response time and let taxpayers know that their problems are being addressed as quickly as possible by an agency that oversees 2.3-million properties. One of my initial actions as assessor was to appoint the county's first-ever property owners advocate, an expert with technical and personal skills who helps individuals concerned with the status of their cases.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG and EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It has been 60 years since a district attorney of Los Angeles County was elected to more than two terms. Gil Garcetti could break that streak if he wins reelection to a third term Tuesday--but it's a big if. Garcetti is widely viewed as vulnerable to a challenge from top Deputy Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley, who finished first in a three-way primary election March 7 and has led Garcetti in every poll conducted since then.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2000 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With no primary to winnow the field of 16 to two, the Los Angeles County assessor's race is a cavalry charge of candidates in a mad dash for the $141,000-a-year job. County government insiders see the main contenders as acting Assessor Rick Auerbach, 52, and former Assessor John Lynch, 63, but they quickly point out that in a field so large, any candidate could capture the winner-take-all sprint. "A nobody buried deep in the bureaucracy could win," says one observer. "It's a real crapshoot."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2000
County Assessor Rick Auerbach was resting at home Wednesday after suffering a heart attack as he ran a marathon Sunday in San Diego. The recently appointed assessor was running his 57th marathon when he suffered what Assistant Assessor Robert Olson described as a mild heart attack. Auerbach underwent surgery at Scripps Mercy Hospital and single blocked artery was detected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County's real estate market continues to climb out of the depths of the recession of the early 1990s, but the region's more affluent neighborhoods have made markedly greater gains than other areas, according to property tax data to be released today. Overall, the county's real estate assessments increased by $30 billion, or 6%, last year, a boost that shuts the door on years of decline in property values that led to government crises and financial hardship for homeowners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The Los Angeles County assessor was rebuffed a second time by state tax officials this week in his effort to tax satellites parked 22,300 miles above the Earth. The state Board of Equalization voted 5 to 0 for a rule that bans local and state government from imposing property taxes on satellites in outer space.
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