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Rick Aviles

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NEWS
February 4, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who regularly covers comedy for OC Live!
No one who saw the hit movie "Ghost" will forget the ruthless lowlife who emerged from the shadows to kill Patrick Swayze on the streets of New York. It wasn't exactly the kind of role you'd expect from a stand-up comic. But for Rick Aviles, a Puerto Rican comedian from New York's Lower East Side, the character was irresistible.
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NEWS
February 4, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who regularly covers comedy for OC Live!
No one who saw the hit movie "Ghost" will forget the ruthless lowlife who emerged from the shadows to kill Patrick Swayze on the streets of New York. It wasn't exactly the kind of role you'd expect from a stand-up comic. But for Rick Aviles, a Puerto Rican comedian from New York's Lower East Side, the character was irresistible.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
In carnival parlance, the geek was the guy--usually a hopeless alcoholic--who bit the heads off live chickens for the jaded clientele. Supposedly, this act symbolizes the lowest level to which you can sink in show business. But, in "Mondo New York" (selected theaters), performance artist and painter Joe Coleman appears to try to sink lower. He comes on stage, rants, pulls out two live white mice and bites off their heads--right before setting off the fireworks attached to his chest.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lot of talent and good will has gone into "The Saint of Fort Washington" (AMC Century 14), a lower-depths drama about homelessness starring Danny Glover and Matt Dillon. It's so well-meaning that it makes you want to go out and make a donation to your favorite charity. But its good intentions are double-edged: Like most do-gooder fables, this one wears its righteousness like a red badge of courage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
The great American originals, from Poor Richard and his Almanack to Little Richard and "Tutti Frutti," often show a genius for mixing up the mundane with the spiritual, the everyday with the ecstatic. That's Jim Jarmusch's strategy in his beautiful new movie, "Mystery Train" (at the Nuart), one of the year's best.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carol Burnett, the one-time queen of variety television, has been working furiously of late to restore luster to a crown that is quickly tarnishing. The 3-week-old "The Carol Burnett Show," her long-awaited return to CBS after 13 years, has been suffering through falling ratings, creative differences and an on-air identity crisis. The one-hour variety show, the last of the new fall network series to make it to the air, premiered Nov. 1 as a contemporary, cutting-edge ensemble of comedy sketches.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carol Burnett was admiring her new peach-colored dressing room at CBS Television City in Hollywood. "You're the first person to break it in," she said to her visitor, plopping down on the sofa. "Isn't it lovely? I don't have my paintings up yet. It's a combination dressing room and office because there isn't enough space at CBS." It was three days before the first taping of her new CBS variety series "The Carol Burnett Show," premiering Friday.
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