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Rick Bass

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Nashville Chrome" is Rick Bass' 25th book — at this stage in the game, there's no such thing as a fresh start …and thank goodness. Pieces of the writer's previous work — landscapes, "pewter skies," endangered species (human and animal), endangered innocence, human greed, nostalgia and regret — are all here in this imagined story of three real-life siblings who formed the root stock of what we now call country music, Nashville style. Bass gives us Maxine, Bonnie and Jim Ed Brown, three of the five children of Floyd and Birdie Brown; their childhood in the backwoods of post-Depression south-central Arkansas; and their rise to fame as singers and songwriters, members of the fledgling Grand Ole Opry and contemporaries of Elvis Presley.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Nashville Chrome" is Rick Bass' 25th book — at this stage in the game, there's no such thing as a fresh start …and thank goodness. Pieces of the writer's previous work — landscapes, "pewter skies," endangered species (human and animal), endangered innocence, human greed, nostalgia and regret — are all here in this imagined story of three real-life siblings who formed the root stock of what we now call country music, Nashville style. Bass gives us Maxine, Bonnie and Jim Ed Brown, three of the five children of Floyd and Birdie Brown; their childhood in the backwoods of post-Depression south-central Arkansas; and their rise to fame as singers and songwriters, members of the fledgling Grand Ole Opry and contemporaries of Elvis Presley.
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BOOKS
March 4, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
The characters in Rick Bass' vivid short stories probably would style themselves "good ol' boys," although alcoholic clods would be a more accurate assessment. A decidedly Yahoo tone permeates these stories, even coloring the first-person narrative of the redneck professor of English literature in "Cats and Students, Bubbles and Abysses." Bass is a skillful craftsman, but he uses his talent to describe unpleasant characters in unlikely situations.
BOOKS
June 29, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
RICK BASS is one of this country's greatest and most reluctant activists. He grew up in Texas, worked for eight years in Mississippi as an oil and gas geologist and moved, 21 years ago, to the Yaak Valley in northwestern Montana. He started writing fiction, but it didn't take long for the landscape and a certain "chemistry of spirit" to turn him into an environmental activist. Bass was, he freely admits, shaped by the land. "Why I Came West" is the story of that process.
BOOKS
March 18, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Unlike his short stories, which flounder through their oppressively Southern settings, Rick Bass' essays are crisp, neatly structured and highly entertaining. His first- person accounts of camping, fishing and canoeing capture the lure of the wilderness and the camaraderie of the people who love it. Bass' spare prose has a studied artlessness reminiscent of Japanese brush painting.
BOOKS
June 29, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
RICK BASS is one of this country's greatest and most reluctant activists. He grew up in Texas, worked for eight years in Mississippi as an oil and gas geologist and moved, 21 years ago, to the Yaak Valley in northwestern Montana. He started writing fiction, but it didn't take long for the landscape and a certain "chemistry of spirit" to turn him into an environmental activist. Bass was, he freely admits, shaped by the land. "Why I Came West" is the story of that process.
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Impelled by a profound love of the land, the 10 stories in "In the Loyal Mountains" are a reminder that American literature draws its unique strength from a powerful sense of place. Here, author Rick Bass concentrates on two distinct and contrasting regions, the Delta country of Mississippi and a remote valley in Montana, areas linked only by a mystical quality common to both.
BOOKS
January 26, 1997 | PAM HOUSTON, Pam Houston is the author of "Cowboys Are My Weakness" (Norton)
"Some nights my heart pounds so hard in anger that in the morning when I wake up it is sore, as if it has been rubbing against my ribs--as if it has worn a place in them as smooth as stones beneath a waterfall." This is the first sentence of the shortest chapter in "The Book of Yaak," the most recent offering from Rick Bass.
BOOKS
January 18, 1998 | THOMAS CURWEN, Thomas Curwen is deputy editor of Book Review
At 9,100 feet, Yovimpa Point sits on the edge of the Earth. From here the world falls away in a succession of unspoiled plateaus and cliffs that drop nearly 5,000 feet before rising again to the north rim of the Grand Canyon, leaving Yovimpa with a clear shot over forests of pinon and ponderosa pines to a horizon more than 100 miles away.
BOOKS
February 12, 1989 | Christopher Zenowich, Zenowich's novel, "The Cost of Living," is forthcoming from Harper & Row. and
Lately, many writers of the short story have stood accused of a homogenized "minimalism," the result of a constricting fashion acquired in writers' workshops at colleges and universities. Regardless of the questionable merit of such charges, these two first collections provide ample evidence that, in the hands of Hansen and Bass, the short story is alive and well, and anything but minimal.
BOOKS
November 12, 2006 | John Balzar, John Balzar is a Times staff writer who has written extensively about the West.
FOR those of us at home in the West, literary regionalism has always been a curious matter: When we hear that so-and-so is, for instance, a Southern writer, it is presumed that we grasp a timeless sensibility as distinct to the letters of the region as the drawl is to its conversations. Much as it's talked about, the same has not been true of that terrain from Texas to Montana, the landscape of the mythic West.
MAGAZINE
April 16, 2006 | Rick Bass, Rick Bass is the author of 22 books, including "The Lives of Rocks," to be published this fall.
It keeps moving, but when I was a child growing up on the outskirts of Houston I believed that it was already all gone, that I had just missed it, the West, by only a single generation, or at the most two--as maybe every generation believes it has just missed the West.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2005 | Adam Hill, Special to The Times
"The Diezmo," the terrific new novel from Rick Bass, is inspired by an infamous episode in early Texas history that became known as the Mier Expedition. At a time of continuing tensions and occasional Mexican invasions along the border of the new Republic, Texans formed raiding units whose actions went well beyond security into full-fledged pillage and slaughter.
MAGAZINE
July 6, 2003 | Rick Bass, Rick Bass is a Montana-based writer. He is the author of "The Hermit's Story," a collection of short stories published last year by Houghton Mifflin.
One previous spring our friend Tracy, while roughhousing with my younger daughter Lowry, had lost from her lobes a pair of earrings that her husband, Dick, had given her. We searched long and hard for them, particularly around the slide and swing set, though to no avail. It was late May, almost into June, and the grass and clover were high enough already (and the earrings small ones) that we were unable to locate them, though we looked until dusk. "Don't worry," Tracy said. "They'll show up."
BOOKS
May 28, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
LAURA By Larry Watson; Pocket Books: 326 pp., $24.95 Larry Watson is a great describer of the longings of men--for love, freedom, a place in history. Previous books, such as "Montana 1948," "White Crosses" and "Justice," are always listed among the best of the West. But "Laura" is a supremely Eastern novel, set in suburbia, in New England, in academia, in the middle class.
BOOKS
January 18, 1998 | THOMAS CURWEN, Thomas Curwen is deputy editor of Book Review
At 9,100 feet, Yovimpa Point sits on the edge of the Earth. From here the world falls away in a succession of unspoiled plateaus and cliffs that drop nearly 5,000 feet before rising again to the north rim of the Grand Canyon, leaving Yovimpa with a clear shot over forests of pinon and ponderosa pines to a horizon more than 100 miles away.
BOOKS
May 28, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
LAURA By Larry Watson; Pocket Books: 326 pp., $24.95 Larry Watson is a great describer of the longings of men--for love, freedom, a place in history. Previous books, such as "Montana 1948," "White Crosses" and "Justice," are always listed among the best of the West. But "Laura" is a supremely Eastern novel, set in suburbia, in New England, in academia, in the middle class.
BOOKS
January 28, 1996 | John Balzar, Times national correspondent John Balzar was The Times Nairobi bureau chief during 1995
From my house in Kenya it was 15 miles to a hillock where I saw a pride of six lions last year, four of them full-maned males. Lions are king, as they say. But as an American reared in the American West, the point I would like to make is that lions, grand as they are, are not king of my imagination and never will be. What evokes wonders of the wild like no other creature is the bear, noble and mystical. Whether teddy bear or grizzly bear, they console us if our crowded world seems to be falling apart.
BOOKS
January 26, 1997 | PAM HOUSTON, Pam Houston is the author of "Cowboys Are My Weakness" (Norton)
"Some nights my heart pounds so hard in anger that in the morning when I wake up it is sore, as if it has been rubbing against my ribs--as if it has worn a place in them as smooth as stones beneath a waterfall." This is the first sentence of the shortest chapter in "The Book of Yaak," the most recent offering from Rick Bass.
BOOKS
January 28, 1996 | John Balzar, Times national correspondent John Balzar was The Times Nairobi bureau chief during 1995
From my house in Kenya it was 15 miles to a hillock where I saw a pride of six lions last year, four of them full-maned males. Lions are king, as they say. But as an American reared in the American West, the point I would like to make is that lions, grand as they are, are not king of my imagination and never will be. What evokes wonders of the wild like no other creature is the bear, noble and mystical. Whether teddy bear or grizzly bear, they console us if our crowded world seems to be falling apart.
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