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Rick Berman

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1994 | Daniel Howard Cerone, Daniel Howard Cerone is a Times staff writer
In a darkened editing room, sequestered behind the eternally guarded walls of Paramount Pictures, a film image flickers on a small screen. Six men gather around an editing table, their faces a whirligig of light and color projected by the moving image. Their eyes are transfixed on fresh footage of a miniature Capt. James T. Kirk, struggling atop a desert mountain on the uninhabited planet of Varidian Three in the finale of "Star Trek: Generations," which opens Friday. The aging but spry Kirk, reprised by William Shatner, inches along a footbridge that clings with a tenuous grip to the mountainside.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994
Your cover story on "Star Trek" executive producer Rick Berman touched on an issue that has been bothering me (" 'Star Trek' Only a Show? Is This Guy Serious?" Nov. 13). It is an issue even more serious that the trend toward militarism on "Star Trek." The problem is that the Federation and humans have hostile relationships with all the other recurring alien civilizations except for Vulcans and Bayjorans, and even then, resentment and friction are common. I find it disturbing that Romulans, Klingons, Cardassians, Ferengi and most of what Cerone terms "the whole gang in the Alpha Quadrant" are imbued with evil qualities right out of a textbook on racial stereotypes and prejudice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994
Your cover story on "Star Trek" executive producer Rick Berman touched on an issue that has been bothering me (" 'Star Trek' Only a Show? Is This Guy Serious?" Nov. 13). It is an issue even more serious that the trend toward militarism on "Star Trek." The problem is that the Federation and humans have hostile relationships with all the other recurring alien civilizations except for Vulcans and Bayjorans, and even then, resentment and friction are common. I find it disturbing that Romulans, Klingons, Cardassians, Ferengi and most of what Cerone terms "the whole gang in the Alpha Quadrant" are imbued with evil qualities right out of a textbook on racial stereotypes and prejudice.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1994 | Daniel Howard Cerone, Daniel Howard Cerone is a Times staff writer
In a darkened editing room, sequestered behind the eternally guarded walls of Paramount Pictures, a film image flickers on a small screen. Six men gather around an editing table, their faces a whirligig of light and color projected by the moving image. Their eyes are transfixed on fresh footage of a miniature Capt. James T. Kirk, struggling atop a desert mountain on the uninhabited planet of Varidian Three in the finale of "Star Trek: Generations," which opens Friday. The aging but spry Kirk, reprised by William Shatner, inches along a footbridge that clings with a tenuous grip to the mountainside.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1994 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the final episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" airs Monday, Paramount Pictures will pull the plug on its biggest profit maker. Paramount executives are unfazed. "I sleep well," says Kerry McCluggage, chairman of Paramount TV Group. And well he should. Paramount believes that in "Star Trek" it has found the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow: an entertainment property suited to endless exploitation. It's the kind of hit every studio dreams of but few can actually claim.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1997
Producers and others from the syndicated series "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" will discuss how the show was conceived and created during "Creating Science Fiction: Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at the Museum of Television & Radio, 465 N. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills. Scheduled panelists include series co-creator and executive producer Rick Berman and executive producer Ira Steven Behr.
NEWS
February 10, 2005
So Rick Berman blames "franchise fatigue" and "fan apathy" for the cancellation of "Star Trek Enterprise" (" 'Star Trek's' Bold TV Journey Coming to an End," Feb. 3). Berman should perhaps consider that the failure of this show was due more to hackneyed story lines and unappealing characters than fan ennui. If he gave us compelling stories, consistent with the "Star Trek" universe as it was mapped out in the franchise's earlier incarnations, "Next Generation" and "Deep Space Nine," perhaps more of us would have watched.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1994
Dear Humans of the L.A. Times: I read with particular interest your article last Sunday about Rick Berman, the executive producer of the "Star Trek" franchise. It's interesting to learn more of what is happening on the far side of the Paramount lot. However, I take umbrage at your mistaking me for my nephew Nog (Aron Eisenberg) in your shot from "Deep Space Nine." Do all we Ferengi look the same to you? You should be ashamed! Not only is there an obvious height difference, but I haven't worn a veil in the back of my head for ages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Corey Allen, an actor-turned Emmy Award-winning director who earned a slice of film immortality in the 1950s playing the doomed high school gang leader who challenges James Dean to a "chicken run" in "Rebel Without a Cause," has died. He was 75. Allen died at his home in Hollywood on Sunday, two days before his 76 t h birthday, said family spokesman Mickey Cottrell. The specific cause was not given. Allen had Parkinson's disease for the last two decades, Cottrell said, but he remained active directing plays until a few years ago. Allen's death came a month after that of another "Rebel" alumnus, Dennis Hopper , who played one of the high school gang members.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
No disrespect intended to the proud Son'a people but, hey, where are the Borg when you need them? It was the terrifying and thoroughly alien Borg who made the last "Star Trek" film, "First Contact," one of the best in the series' 19-year theatrical history. The latest and ninth installment in that line, "Star Trek: Insurrection," lacks the adrenalized oomph of its predecessor, but no adventure of the Starship Enterprise is without its gee-whiz affability.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1994 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the final episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" airs Monday, Paramount Pictures will pull the plug on its biggest profit maker. Paramount executives are unfazed. "I sleep well," says Kerry McCluggage, chairman of Paramount TV Group. And well he should. Paramount believes that in "Star Trek" it has found the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow: an entertainment property suited to endless exploitation. It's the kind of hit every studio dreams of but few can actually claim.
NEWS
January 5, 1992
Concerning the "Commentary" (by James Endrst) TV Times, Dec. 15: It's interesting how "Star Trek: The Next Generation" executive producer Rick Berman says the show's creator, Gene Roddenberry--before his death--had complete control of the show until "in the second season he began to step away. And by the third season (his input) was quite a bit less." I don't doubt it one bit, especially since Berman admitted how the original "Star Trek" had "a lot more fun and was more swashbuckling and sexy"--Roddenberry's precise vision of man as he makes contact with new worlds.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
This is a test. This is only a test. Can anyone outside the hard-core faithful tell the "Star Trek" movies apart? One featured whales, but was it "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" or "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier"? And at this late date who remembers just what it was that made Khan so angry in "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan"? That blurring is not likely to happen with "Star Trek: First Contact," the eighth movie in a series that may yet see more episodes than Andy Hardy.
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