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Rick Burleson

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SPORTS
May 17, 1994 | Times staff writer David W. Myers catches up with former Dodgers and Angels
Acquired from Boston in December of 1980, Burleson batted .293 in his first season as an Angel and led all of the league's shortstops in putouts and assists. But he suffered a torn rotator cuff in the 1982 season and played in only 51 more games until 1986, when his .284 average helped the club to a division title. He was voted comeback player of the year. Signed by Baltimore as a free agent in '87, "Rooster" retired later that year with a .273 lifetime average.
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SPORTS
April 3, 1997 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a cold, blustery, winter-like spring day in the Antelope Valley, Rick Burleson bundled up--as much as one can in a baseball uniform--and headed out with a determined look. "I've got to make sure the field is just right for this practice," the JetHawks' first-year manager said before a workout at the Hangar.
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SPORTS
November 25, 1986 | United Press International
Rick Burleson, who rebounded from four years of rotator cuff trouble to contribute to the Angels' division-winning season, Monday was named United Press International's American League Comeback Player of the Year. Burleson, 35, batted .284 with 5 homers and 29 RBI and played three infield positions in helping the Angels capture the AL West title. He appeared in just 11 games in 1982, 33 in 1983, 7 in 1984 and none in 1985.
NEWS
March 28, 1997
When the Angels sent J.T. Snow, a Gold Glove-winning first baseman, to the Giants for pitcher Allen Watson, it wasn't the first time the franchise had taken the risk of trading a popular player. Here are some of the club's prominent deals, with mixed results: 1964: Bo Belinsky As well known for dating Mamie Van Doren as for pitching a no-hitter as a rookie in 1962, Belinsky was the Angels' first glamour boy.
SPORTS
March 14, 1986 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
All that was missing was a moment of silence. In the middle of the first inning here Thursday afternoon, Rick Burleson arose from the Angels dugout and trotted out toward hallowed ground. He positioned himself on the infield dirt between second and third bases, punched the palm of his glove and began to draw a bead on Tony Phillips, the Oakland A's leadoff hitter. Rick Burleson was the Angels' shortstop again. Nearly two years had passed since Burleson last passed this way.
SPORTS
April 3, 1997 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a cold, blustery, winter-like spring day in the Antelope Valley, Rick Burleson bundled up--as much as one can in a baseball uniform--and headed out with a determined look. "I've got to make sure the field is just right for this practice," the JetHawks' first-year manager said before a workout at the Hangar.
SPORTS
July 11, 1987
The Baltimore Orioles released infielder Rick Burleson, who said he may retire. Burleson, 36, played in 62 games this season, and hit .209 with 14 RBIs and two home runs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1985 | G.\f7 M. Bush \f7
The group of about a dozen people at the Blind Children's Learning Center anxiously awaited the arrival of Rick Burleson, the California Angels shortstop. Burleson was a few minutes late Friday morning, and everyone knew he was bringing a check for the center. But if anyone knew the exact amount, it was a well-kept secret.
SPORTS
September 23, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel Manager Marcel Lachemann hired his older brother, Bill Lachemann, and former Angel infielder Rick Burleson to be on his coaching staff next season. Bill Lachemann, who has been in the Angel organization for 10 years, will become the bullpen coach. Burleson, who played six years for the Angels, will coach at third base.
SPORTS
November 16, 1996
In four seasons in a third-base coaching box in the major leagues, Rick Burleson has flashed many a sign for a bunt, a stolen base or a hit-and-run. But he's never actually called one. Which is one of the reasons Burleson, a veteran of 13 major league seasons as a shortstop, is so excited about the chance the Seattle Mariners have given him to manage the Lancaster JetHawks next season.
SPORTS
July 13, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel General Manager Bill Bavasi has not felt compelled to give Manager Marcel Lachemann a vote of confidence amid speculation that Lachemann might be replaced, but third-base coach Rick Burleson did Friday night. "This B.S. I read about Marcel being the next guy to go is ridiculous," said Burleson, a former all-star shortstop. "This guy is as prepared as any manager I've ever been around, and I've been around some good ones.
SPORTS
July 13, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel General Manager Bill Bavasi has not felt compelled to give Manager Marcel Lachemann a vote of confidence amid speculation that Lachemann might be replaced, but third base Coach Rick Burleson did give one Friday night. "This b.s. I read about Marcel being the next guy to go is ridiculous," said Burleson, a former all-star shortstop. "This guy is as prepared as any manager I've ever been around, and I've been around some good ones.
SPORTS
September 23, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel Manager Marcel Lachemann hired his older brother, Bill Lachemann, and former Angel infielder Rick Burleson to be on his coaching staff next season. Bill Lachemann, who has been in the Angel organization for 10 years, will become the bullpen coach. Burleson, who played six years for the Angels, will coach at third base.
SPORTS
May 17, 1994 | Times staff writer David W. Myers catches up with former Dodgers and Angels
Acquired from Boston in December of 1980, Burleson batted .293 in his first season as an Angel and led all of the league's shortstops in putouts and assists. But he suffered a torn rotator cuff in the 1982 season and played in only 51 more games until 1986, when his .284 average helped the club to a division title. He was voted comeback player of the year. Signed by Baltimore as a free agent in '87, "Rooster" retired later that year with a .273 lifetime average.
SPORTS
July 11, 1987
The Baltimore Orioles released infielder Rick Burleson, who said he may retire. Burleson, 36, played in 62 games this season, and hit .209 with 14 RBIs and two home runs.
SPORTS
November 16, 1996
In four seasons in a third-base coaching box in the major leagues, Rick Burleson has flashed many a sign for a bunt, a stolen base or a hit-and-run. But he's never actually called one. Which is one of the reasons Burleson, a veteran of 13 major league seasons as a shortstop, is so excited about the chance the Seattle Mariners have given him to manage the Lancaster JetHawks next season.
SPORTS
November 1, 1986 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Another day, another two Angel veterans became ex-Angels. Infielder-designated hitter Rick Burleson and relief pitcher Doug Corbett went the way Friday that Terry Forster and Vern Ruhle had gone Thursday. General Manager Mike Port said the team would not be offering 1987 contracts to Burleson, who batted .284 in 93 games, and Corbett, who had a 4-2 record and 10 saves.
SPORTS
May 16, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Angel pitching was staggered again Friday night--and that was before Don Sutton allowed six runs in four-plus innings. Although they eventually pulled out a 7-6 victory over the Baltimore Orioles in the 10th inning at Anaheim Stadium, the Angels were stunned by the loss of two more members of their starting rotation. That means Manager Gene Mauch is no longer just juggling and patching with his pitching. Now, it has gotten down to scrounging.
SPORTS
March 14, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Winter took a hard toll on the Angels after the decline and fall last October. Gene Mauch woke up every morning to a knotted stomach. Reggie Jackson, Rick Burleson and Doug Corbett didn't make it to another Angel camp. Brian Downing almost quit. But the cruelest winter, no doubt, belonged to relief pitcher Donnie Moore.
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