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Rick Cole

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
In selecting Rick Cole as his deputy mayor for budget and innovation last week, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti got an outspoken proponent of high-density building along transit corridors and someone who, as a former city manager, demanded accountability from department heads. Cole, 60, was Ventura's city manager for eight years before abruptly stepping down last year. He was city manager of Azusa before that and is a former mayor of Pasadena. During his tenure in Ventura, he championed the adoption of an all-infill general plan, reorganized departments and recruited high-tech businesses to the laid-back coastal city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
In selecting Rick Cole as his deputy mayor for budget and innovation last week, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti got an outspoken proponent of high-density building along transit corridors and someone who, as a former city manager, demanded accountability from department heads. Cole, 60, was Ventura's city manager for eight years before abruptly stepping down last year. He was city manager of Azusa before that and is a former mayor of Pasadena. During his tenure in Ventura, he championed the adoption of an all-infill general plan, reorganized departments and recruited high-tech businesses to the laid-back coastal city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Pasadena Mayor Rick Cole mixed it up with the Tournament of Roses in a big way was two years ago, after a direct descendant of Christopher Columbus was appointed grand marshal of the 1992 Rose Parade. Cole--a central figure in fashioning this week's historic truce between the tournament and its black critics--led the criticism that time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. In selecting Rick Cole as his deputy mayor for budget and innovation, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is getting an outspoken proponent of high-density building along transit corridors and one who, as a city manager, demanded accountability from department heads. Cole, 60, was Ventura's city manager for eight years before abruptly stepping down last year. He was city manager of Azusa before that and is a former mayor of Pasadena.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rick Cole appealed to Pasadenans on Tuesday to unite in the wake of fires, killings and divisive stresses prompted by city politics. Returning to a favorite theme--that of "reinventing government"--in his annual State of the City Address, Cole called upon citizens to get involved in municipal government in the spirit of rural barn-raising efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Eight years ago, elated Ventura City Hall officials had snagged Rick Cole as their new city manager, hailing Southern California's smart-growth guru as just the guy to transform their sleepy beach town into a model of sustainable, eco-friendly growth. Cole had helped revitalize Pasadena by reimagining the city's historic core, called Old Pasadena. He did the same for Azusa, applying the "new urbanism" rules of high-density, pedestrian-friendly construction as an alternative to big-box retail development and suburban sprawl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1991
One day after the Tournament of Roses announced its selection of a direct descendant of Christopher Columbus as the grand marshal for the Rose Parade, Pasadena Vice Mayor Rick Cole lambasted the selection as "a symbol of greed, slavery, rape and genocide." In selecting Cristobal Colon, the 20th heir to Columbus' title of Admiral of the Ocean Sea, the Tournament of Roses has chosen "a white male European who claims the heredity titles won by conquest," Cole said in a statement Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1994
Pasadena City Councilman Rick Cole, known for championing liberal causes such as community policing and minority rights, announced Thursday that he will not seek a fourth term in the March 7 municipal election. Cole, 41, said he was retiring from the council to pursue, as a citizen, his goal of improving and increasing community participation in local government. Cole, who joined the City Council in 1983, said he had not settled on a job or volunteer position to do that.
NEWS
April 4, 1991
Ever mindful of who gets credit for what, Pasadena city directors rapped the knuckles of colleague Rick Cole recently for his March press conference that upstaged the mayor, a fellow director and the city manager. "Perhaps I overstepped my bounds," Cole conceded when it was over. Seems that Cole was struck by 1991 census figures that portrayed whites as a minority in Pasadena, while the Latino and Asian population had grown.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were apologies all around this week from Mayor Rick Cole, swept up in a flap about the way he dressed for the Tournament of Roses Parade. He was sorry, Cole said, for having "caused offense, or hurt" on Jan. 1, after riding down Colorado Boulevard--and appearing before an estimated 400 million television viewers worldwide--in a plain Oxford shirt, rather than a tie and jacket.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Eight years ago, elated Ventura City Hall officials had snagged Rick Cole as their new city manager, hailing Southern California's smart-growth guru as just the guy to transform their sleepy beach town into a model of sustainable, eco-friendly growth. Cole had helped revitalize Pasadena by reimagining the city's historic core, called Old Pasadena. He did the same for Azusa, applying the "new urbanism" rules of high-density, pedestrian-friendly construction as an alternative to big-box retail development and suburban sprawl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2004 | Daryl Kelley, Times Staff Writer
In 20 years as a self-taught expert on urban redevelopment, Rick Cole has touted ideas once dismissed as radical but that are increasingly embraced by the mainstream in local government. Cole, named last month as Ventura's new city manager, has become one of the nation's best-known advocates of so-called smart growth -- the clustering of homes, stores and offices in pedestrian-oriented communities -- and new urbanism, which promotes denser housing in cities as an alternative to suburban sprawl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2004 | Holly J. Wolcott, Times Staff Writer
Azusa City Manager Rick Cole, known for his energetic and outspoken style, said Thursday that he has accepted an offer for the top job in Ventura. Cole, 50, told Azusa officials Wednesday that he would be resigning his post in the city of 45,000 to become Ventura's city manager in April, a position vacated earlier this month by Donna Landeros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than a few motorists have done double takes and clucked their tongues at those sexually suggestive signs popping up across town announcing Los Angeles' newest sports franchise. But Azusa City Manager Rick Cole decided to do something about them. And now the public official is being investigated on suspicion of criminal vandalism for what he says was an act of conscience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1998 | PETER Y. HONG and RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rick Cole and his new employer, the city of Azusa, have one thing in common: an image problem. Cole, who will start work as Azusa's city manager in July, is a former Pasadena mayor known for his razor-sharp mind and switchblade tongue. Azusa is an often overlooked town with a name derived from the Shoshone word for skunk. Landmarks include a landfill and a quarry, and its commercial core is so bleak that an AM/PM convenience store ranks among the city's top sales tax generators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1994
Pasadena City Councilman Rick Cole, known for championing liberal causes such as community policing and minority rights, announced Thursday that he will not seek a fourth term in the March 7 municipal election. Cole, 41, said he was retiring from the council to pursue, as a citizen, his goal of improving and increasing community participation in local government. Cole, who joined the City Council in 1983, said he had not settled on a job or volunteer position to do that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. In selecting Rick Cole as his deputy mayor for budget and innovation, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is getting an outspoken proponent of high-density building along transit corridors and one who, as a city manager, demanded accountability from department heads. Cole, 60, was Ventura's city manager for eight years before abruptly stepping down last year. He was city manager of Azusa before that and is a former mayor of Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1998 | PETER Y. HONG and RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rick Cole and his new employer, the city of Azusa, have one thing in common: an image problem. Cole, who will start work as Azusa's city manager in July, is a former Pasadena mayor known for his razor-sharp mind and switchblade tongue. Azusa is an often overlooked town with a name derived from the Shoshone word for skunk. Landmarks include a landfill and a quarry, and its commercial core is so bleak that an AM/PM convenience store ranks among the city's top sales tax generators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Pasadena Mayor Rick Cole mixed it up with the Tournament of Roses in a big way was two years ago, after a direct descendant of Christopher Columbus was appointed grand marshal of the 1992 Rose Parade. Cole--a central figure in fashioning this week's historic truce between the tournament and its black critics--led the criticism that time.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rick Cole appealed to Pasadenans on Tuesday to unite in the wake of fires, killings and divisive stresses prompted by city politics. Returning to a favorite theme--that of "reinventing government"--in his annual State of the City Address, Cole called upon citizens to get involved in municipal government in the spirit of rural barn-raising efforts.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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