Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRick Danko
IN THE NEWS

Rick Danko

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | CHUCK PHILIPS
It has been 12 1/2 years since the legendary Band called it quits, going out in style with the equally legendary "Last Waltz" concert. Since then, songwriter and guitarist Robbie Robertson has pursued film work and a solo recording career. Drummer Levon Helm went into acting. Organist Garth Hudson fronted a country band and scored movies. Bassist Rick Danko has led his own groups and worked on assorted sessions. Pianist Richard Manuel died in an apparent suicide. Though the remaining members have played together in various combinations, Robertson has always kept his distance from anything smacking of a Band reunion.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Loose and ragtag, stirring and poignant, the documentary "Ain't in It for My Health: A Film About Levon Helm" proves a fitting tribute to its late star, perhaps best known as the singer-drummer of the influential late-1960s and '70s folk-rock group the Band. Shot mainly in and around Helm's Woodstock, N.Y., farmhouse and recording studio, director Jacob Hatley's twilight-time portrait evocatively captures the ailing yet genial musician - he died of throat cancer last year at age 71 - as he assembles his comeback album, the Grammy Award-winning "Dirt Farmer.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
When Rick Danko puts his singularly emotive voice on a record, it's something of an occasion. He sang a trove of great songs as a member of the Band (there are no more heartfelt performances in the annals of rock than Danko singing "It Makes No Difference" or "The Unfaithful Servant") and in 1977 released a strong, promising album of his own. But since then, as far as recordings are concerned, little if anything has been heard from him, despite his fairly active round of live dates.
NEWS
December 11, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rick Danko, a Canadian musician who helped forge a rich musical panorama of American history and myth as a member of the influential rock group the Band, died in his sleep Thursday night at his home near Woodstock, N.Y. He was 56 and the cause of death, while not immediately known, was not considered suspicious, said Walter Dobushak, the medical examiner for Ulster County, N.Y.
NEWS
December 11, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rick Danko, a Canadian musician who helped forge a rich musical panorama of American history and myth as a member of the influential rock group the Band, died in his sleep Thursday night at his home near Woodstock, N.Y. He was 56 and the cause of death, while not immediately known, was not considered suspicious, said Walter Dobushak, the medical examiner for Ulster County, N.Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"We been rehearsin' for this," announced a smirking Rick Danko at the beginning of his and Garth Hudson's first set Tuesday at Bogart's in Long Beach, as if rehearsing was the exception rather than the rule. (That could well be the case, given the reputation for erratic performances from the two ex-Band members, who have both been in states of semi-retirement since the Band's "Last Waltz" a dozen years ago.) So you say, "oh / you wanna know / the shape they're in," these Band alumni? Not bad.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | Randy Lewis
It was just a passing comment. The guy who made it, rock veteran Rick Danko, probably didn't think twice about it. But it got Irvine stockbroker Scott Flanagan plenty steamed. The remark came about two-thirds of the way through a recent Sunday night show at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano. It was kinda late (close to 11), but Danko wanted to keep the fans pumped up, so he looked out at the crowd and suggested: "Why don't you just take the day off tomorrow? . " Sure, it's one of those cliched exhortations designed to lull crowds into thinking they're going to party all night long when in 95% of the cases they're going to party precisely until the performers' contracted time is up and not a time-and-a-half-minute more.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Starr Light, Starr Bright. It's official: Ringo Starr is taking his jewelry, his nose and an "All-Starr Band" on his first U.S. concert tour since the Beatles left the road in 1966. On the 31-date tour set to begin July 25 at the Poplar Creek Amphitheatre in Chicago and end Sept. 4 at Los Angeles' Greek Theatre, the ex-Mop Top will preside over a band including Joe Walsh, Rick Danko, Levon Helm, Billy Preston, Nils Lofgren, Clarence Clemons and Dr. John. There is also the possibility of one show being broadcast on pay-per-view television, a spokesman says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Loose and ragtag, stirring and poignant, the documentary "Ain't in It for My Health: A Film About Levon Helm" proves a fitting tribute to its late star, perhaps best known as the singer-drummer of the influential late-1960s and '70s folk-rock group the Band. Shot mainly in and around Helm's Woodstock, N.Y., farmhouse and recording studio, director Jacob Hatley's twilight-time portrait evocatively captures the ailing yet genial musician - he died of throat cancer last year at age 71 - as he assembles his comeback album, the Grammy Award-winning "Dirt Farmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1989 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Gary Busey has never been cast in any of the "Star Trek" movies, but that's not deterring him from trying to boldly go where no actor has gone before: to rock 'n' roll stardom. Plenty of rockers have beamed up to the big screen, starting with Elvis (the Capt. Kirk of rock 'n' roll himself) to the Beatles up through Tina Turner and Sting. It's successfully navigating the opposite direction that apparently requires greater warp drive. Busey--who gained fame playing one of rock's pioneers in "The Buddy Holly Story"--made his latest bid Sunday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, where he joined ex-Band members Rick Danko and Garth Hudson and assorted friends for the final show of a fleeting three-date Southland tour.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
When Rick Danko puts his singularly emotive voice on a record, it's something of an occasion. He sang a trove of great songs as a member of the Band (there are no more heartfelt performances in the annals of rock than Danko singing "It Makes No Difference" or "The Unfaithful Servant") and in 1977 released a strong, promising album of his own. But since then, as far as recordings are concerned, little if anything has been heard from him, despite his fairly active round of live dates.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | Randy Lewis
It was just a passing comment. The guy who made it, rock veteran Rick Danko, probably didn't think twice about it. But it got Irvine stockbroker Scott Flanagan plenty steamed. The remark came about two-thirds of the way through a recent Sunday night show at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano. It was kinda late (close to 11), but Danko wanted to keep the fans pumped up, so he looked out at the crowd and suggested: "Why don't you just take the day off tomorrow? . " Sure, it's one of those cliched exhortations designed to lull crowds into thinking they're going to party all night long when in 95% of the cases they're going to party precisely until the performers' contracted time is up and not a time-and-a-half-minute more.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Starr Light, Starr Bright. It's official: Ringo Starr is taking his jewelry, his nose and an "All-Starr Band" on his first U.S. concert tour since the Beatles left the road in 1966. On the 31-date tour set to begin July 25 at the Poplar Creek Amphitheatre in Chicago and end Sept. 4 at Los Angeles' Greek Theatre, the ex-Mop Top will preside over a band including Joe Walsh, Rick Danko, Levon Helm, Billy Preston, Nils Lofgren, Clarence Clemons and Dr. John. There is also the possibility of one show being broadcast on pay-per-view television, a spokesman says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1989 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Gary Busey has never been cast in any of the "Star Trek" movies, but that's not deterring him from trying to boldly go where no actor has gone before: to rock 'n' roll stardom. Plenty of rockers have beamed up to the big screen, starting with Elvis (the Capt. Kirk of rock 'n' roll himself) to the Beatles up through Tina Turner and Sting. It's successfully navigating the opposite direction that apparently requires greater warp drive. Busey--who gained fame playing one of rock's pioneers in "The Buddy Holly Story"--made his latest bid Sunday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, where he joined ex-Band members Rick Danko and Garth Hudson and assorted friends for the final show of a fleeting three-date Southland tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1989 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, Times Staff Writer
Actor/musician Gary Busey continues his comeback from a near-fatal motorcycle accident with an evening of rock 'n' roll tonight at North Hollywood's Palomino. Along with keyboardist Rick Danko and guitarist Garth Hudson--both formerly of The Band--Busey will sing original songs and strum his guitar through a medley of Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly material. Tonight's concert is the third of four appearances--the others are in San Diego, Redondo Beach and San Juan Capistrano--Busey's first public performances since December's accident that left him with severe head injuries and required months of physical therapy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | CHUCK PHILIPS
It has been 12 1/2 years since the legendary Band called it quits, going out in style with the equally legendary "Last Waltz" concert. Since then, songwriter and guitarist Robbie Robertson has pursued film work and a solo recording career. Drummer Levon Helm went into acting. Organist Garth Hudson fronted a country band and scored movies. Bassist Rick Danko has led his own groups and worked on assorted sessions. Pianist Richard Manuel died in an apparent suicide. Though the remaining members have played together in various combinations, Robertson has always kept his distance from anything smacking of a Band reunion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1989 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, Times Staff Writer
Actor/musician Gary Busey continues his comeback from a near-fatal motorcycle accident with an evening of rock 'n' roll tonight at North Hollywood's Palomino. Along with keyboardist Rick Danko and guitarist Garth Hudson--both formerly of The Band--Busey will sing original songs and strum his guitar through a medley of Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly material. Tonight's concert is the third of four appearances--the others are in San Diego, Redondo Beach and San Juan Capistrano--Busey's first public performances since December's accident that left him with severe head injuries and required months of physical therapy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | CHUCK PHILIPS
It's been almost 13 years since the legendary Band called it quits, going out in style with the equally legendary "The Last Waltz" concert. Since then, songwriter and guitarist Robbie Robertson has pursued film work and a solo recording career. Drummer Levon Helm went into acting. Organist Garth Hudson fronted a country band and scored movies. Bassist Rick Danko has led his own groups and worked on assorted sessions. Pianist Richard Manuel died in an apparent suicide. Though the remaining members have played together in various combinations, Robertson has always kept his distance from anything smacking of a Band reunion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | CHUCK PHILIPS
It's been almost 13 years since the legendary Band called it quits, going out in style with the equally legendary "The Last Waltz" concert. Since then, songwriter and guitarist Robbie Robertson has pursued film work and a solo recording career. Drummer Levon Helm went into acting. Organist Garth Hudson fronted a country band and scored movies. Bassist Rick Danko has led his own groups and worked on assorted sessions. Pianist Richard Manuel died in an apparent suicide. Though the remaining members have played together in various combinations, Robertson has always kept his distance from anything smacking of a Band reunion.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"We been rehearsin' for this," announced a smirking Rick Danko at the beginning of his and Garth Hudson's first set Tuesday at Bogart's in Long Beach, as if rehearsing was the exception rather than the rule. (That could well be the case, given the reputation for erratic performances from the two ex-Band members, who have both been in states of semi-retirement since the Band's "Last Waltz" a dozen years ago.) So you say, "oh / you wanna know / the shape they're in," these Band alumni? Not bad.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|