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Rick Du Brow

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1991
I have never read a tribute as moving or well-written as the one Rick Du Brow wrote for Michael Landon ("Courage, Grace Are Landon's Legacy," Calendar, July 3). I have admired Landon and his accomplishments for years and was hoping that his death would be written about with sincerity and kindness yet with human touches. Du Brow's article was just that. SHIRLEY D. DANAHER Temecula
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1993
In Rick Du Brow's column "Television Up Close: Wake Me for Test Pattern" (Nov. 9), he successfully brings to light the disturbing onslaught of mediocrity that permeates network television. When I was first exposed to TV in the mid-'60s (when its primary function was entertainment, not electroshock therapy), the medium was rich with imagination and diversity. Programs such as "Batman," "The Munsters," "Bewitched" and "Get Smart" relied on a combination of social satire, escapism, engaging visuals and superb acting to ensure viewer interest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1990
I found Rick Du Brow's piece ("TV News Too Trivial to See the Big Picture," Feb. 10) on the myopic nature of TV news quite fascinating. I agree. The news on television is a bright light indeed. It sweeps down into a situation with obtrusive bedlam, illuminating some things and leaving others in total gloom. Before you are quite sure what has happened, the TV crews depart to their next assignment. MICHAEL LEVINE, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1993
In Howard Rosenberg's column "Beavis and Butt-head: Cool? Or Yet Another Blow to Civilization?" (July 9), he refers to the main characters as being "too exquisitely absurd and vacuous to be resisted," yet this is precisely why they should be. Fighting all rational impulses, I tuned in to an episode of "Beavis and Butt-head" armed with only a college education, morbid curiosity and a six-pack of Pepto-Bismol. It is extremely disheartening to see the onset of unabashed ignorance as a trend in '90s pop culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1991
"And the Oscar for the most jaded, negative, captious, hyper-critical review of the Oscars goes to . . . Rick Du Brow." Monday night's show was not "one of the most effective sleeping pills of the year," as Du Brow writes. It was slick, exciting, varied, classy, humorous. All 20 family members and friends who had gathered to watch thought it was entertaining. Three cheers for the Oscars! And an airline reservation for next year to send Du Brow to Antarctica, where he won't be bored by "another hard day's night."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1993
I don't always agree with Rick Du Brow but he sure hit the nail on the head with his article, "A Spiritual Void on the Small Screen" April 17). The TV shows avoid religion in their stories like it is some kind of a plague. Religion has played a major role in the founding of our government and in the molding of the lives of a great number of people. Hollywood has injected the separation of church and state into their TV scripts and it is wrong. Let's get back to reality. FREDERICK D. MULLEN Upland
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991
Rick Du Brow's column "CNN Brings the Famine Story Out of Africa" (Calendar, June 22) pinpoints one of the primary reasons for the decline of the three big networks--especially their news presentations. They have become top-heavy with huge salaries for anchors, reporters and producers. The Big 3 try to make it up with more commercials and less program content--another reason for viewer dropout. CNN carries its share of commercials too. But on CNN you seem to get a lot more in between.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1993
In Rick Du Brow's column "Television Up Close: Wake Me for Test Pattern" (Nov. 9), he successfully brings to light the disturbing onslaught of mediocrity that permeates network television. When I was first exposed to TV in the mid-'60s (when its primary function was entertainment, not electroshock therapy), the medium was rich with imagination and diversity. Programs such as "Batman," "The Munsters," "Bewitched" and "Get Smart" relied on a combination of social satire, escapism, engaging visuals and superb acting to ensure viewer interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1992
Regarding "It's Not a Dream," by Rick Du Brow (April 5): Du Brow's article on CBS' rise to the top is misleading, misses the point and places that network's executives in a positive light they do not deserve. To give CBS any credit for becoming the No. 1 network is like telling a student who received a D-minus that he or she is doing great because everyone else in the class received an F. The reality is they are all failures. Let's look at the record of CBS and the other networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1990
In the Dec. 16 Calendar, you have contributed several pages to honor Vanessa and Lynn Redgrave. As an American, I deeply resent Rick Du Brow's carrying the older sister's red hem. Apparently, it has been forgotten (or, worse, overlooked) by Du Brow that this woman has been (and undoubtedly still is) violently anti-anti-American. Not all of us have forgotten her Palestinian dance over a burning American flag! It is the nature of Americans to forgive and forget . . . probably Du Brow's nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1993
I don't always agree with Rick Du Brow but he sure hit the nail on the head with his article, "A Spiritual Void on the Small Screen" April 17). The TV shows avoid religion in their stories like it is some kind of a plague. Religion has played a major role in the founding of our government and in the molding of the lives of a great number of people. Hollywood has injected the separation of church and state into their TV scripts and it is wrong. Let's get back to reality. FREDERICK D. MULLEN Upland
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1992
Regarding "It's Not a Dream," by Rick Du Brow (April 5): Du Brow's article on CBS' rise to the top is misleading, misses the point and places that network's executives in a positive light they do not deserve. To give CBS any credit for becoming the No. 1 network is like telling a student who received a D-minus that he or she is doing great because everyone else in the class received an F. The reality is they are all failures. Let's look at the record of CBS and the other networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1992
I read with fascination Rick Du Brow's column, "Restoring Faith in the New TV Pulpit" (Feb. 8). I wrote for the final two years of its existence for "This Is the Life," the longest-running (35 years) syndicated TV show. The reason the show is no longer in production is a simple money matter. The "electronic church" (TV evangelists) was able to pay for the time that for many years had been donated by the networks to more mainstream religious programs. As anyone knows, the cost of producing a show is very high, especially one that honors all the guild pay scales.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991
Magic Johnson may have slam-dunked television's resistance to honest treatment of AIDS-related issues. The barriers have already been broken to some degree in TV news and entertainment, but more often than not, the subject is treated gingerly, if at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1991
I have never read a tribute as moving or well-written as the one Rick Du Brow wrote for Michael Landon ("Courage, Grace Are Landon's Legacy," Calendar, July 3). I have admired Landon and his accomplishments for years and was hoping that his death would be written about with sincerity and kindness yet with human touches. Du Brow's article was just that. SHIRLEY D. DANAHER Temecula
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991
Rick Du Brow's column "CNN Brings the Famine Story Out of Africa" (Calendar, June 22) pinpoints one of the primary reasons for the decline of the three big networks--especially their news presentations. They have become top-heavy with huge salaries for anchors, reporters and producers. The Big 3 try to make it up with more commercials and less program content--another reason for viewer dropout. CNN carries its share of commercials too. But on CNN you seem to get a lot more in between.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1992
I read with fascination Rick Du Brow's column, "Restoring Faith in the New TV Pulpit" (Feb. 8). I wrote for the final two years of its existence for "This Is the Life," the longest-running (35 years) syndicated TV show. The reason the show is no longer in production is a simple money matter. The "electronic church" (TV evangelists) was able to pay for the time that for many years had been donated by the networks to more mainstream religious programs. As anyone knows, the cost of producing a show is very high, especially one that honors all the guild pay scales.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1993
In Howard Rosenberg's column "Beavis and Butt-head: Cool? Or Yet Another Blow to Civilization?" (July 9), he refers to the main characters as being "too exquisitely absurd and vacuous to be resisted," yet this is precisely why they should be. Fighting all rational impulses, I tuned in to an episode of "Beavis and Butt-head" armed with only a college education, morbid curiosity and a six-pack of Pepto-Bismol. It is extremely disheartening to see the onset of unabashed ignorance as a trend in '90s pop culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1991
"And the Oscar for the most jaded, negative, captious, hyper-critical review of the Oscars goes to . . . Rick Du Brow." Monday night's show was not "one of the most effective sleeping pills of the year," as Du Brow writes. It was slick, exciting, varied, classy, humorous. All 20 family members and friends who had gathered to watch thought it was entertaining. Three cheers for the Oscars! And an airline reservation for next year to send Du Brow to Antarctica, where he won't be bored by "another hard day's night."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1990
In the Dec. 16 Calendar, you have contributed several pages to honor Vanessa and Lynn Redgrave. As an American, I deeply resent Rick Du Brow's carrying the older sister's red hem. Apparently, it has been forgotten (or, worse, overlooked) by Du Brow that this woman has been (and undoubtedly still is) violently anti-anti-American. Not all of us have forgotten her Palestinian dance over a burning American flag! It is the nature of Americans to forgive and forget . . . probably Du Brow's nature.
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