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Rick Elias

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
Rick Elias and 3D Picnic both debuted in 1990 with excellent albums that placed them among the talents most worth watching on the local rock scene. Now, strong new releases by both signal that those first efforts were no fluke. The rating system ranges from * (poor) to ***** (a classic). Three stars denote a solid recommendation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
Rick Elias and 3D Picnic both debuted in 1990 with excellent albums that placed them among the talents most worth watching on the local rock scene. Now, strong new releases by both signal that those first efforts were no fluke. The rating system ranges from * (poor) to ***** (a classic). Three stars denote a solid recommendation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1990 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
In the early 1980s, Rick Elias was the angry young man of San Diego's then-burgeoning original-music scene. While most of the popular local bands were playing crude punk rock, the Rick Elias Band was playing passionate, melodic rock 'n' roll that was a lot more refined and eloquent. Even so, Elias' musical vision was perpetually clouded by tears of rage. His lyrics were bitter and nihilistic. On stage, he'd snarl and he'd scowl. He'd spit and he'd curse.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rick Elias sat in his living room, reciting a litany that could be a prayer, or perhaps a curse, for the creatively dead. "Real conservative, easy-listening pop; the least offensive," said the tall, craggy-faced singer, lining up the pejorative adjectives as he set forth his definition of the stereotypical Christian pop performer. "Hyper-evangelistic, dogmatic, preachy. All the typical epithets hurled at Christian artists, and rightly so, most of the time."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rick Elias sat in his living room, reciting a litany that could be a prayer, or perhaps a curse, for the creatively dead. "Real conservative, easy-listening pop; the least offensive," said the tall, craggy-faced singer, lining up the pejorative adjectives as he set forth his definition of the stereotypical Christian pop performer. "Hyper-evangelistic, dogmatic, preachy. All the typical epithets hurled at Christian artists, and rightly so, most of the time."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND
The Santa Monica Civic was abuzz Thursday night with the rumor that there would be an on-stage reunion of Walter Becker and Donald Fagen--the song trust of the great '70s band Steely Dan. But the promise wasn't followed up with the goods--as was the case with much else associated with the Soundcheck Rock Competition, a combination fund-raising effort (for the T. J. Martell Foundation) and Yamaha-sponsored battle of the bands. There was an all-star jam at the end, though.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM
Individualism is the indispensable ingredient of good rock music. A strong, proud, independent streak that challenges dogma and received wisdom, declaring the right to think and speak for oneself, to hold and express a personal vision--that is the rocker's greatest gift, and it is rock's greatest claim to being a popular art form, rather than merely a form that is popular. Rock is--or ought to be--the performer's diary, and the audience's bulletin board: lived experience, set to a backbeat.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margaret Becker has an expansive, soul-inflected voice, but because she applies it to the field of Christian pop, she sometimes finds her thematic options narrowed. Becker's four albums are filled with spiritual love songs to God. But sometimes, the singer said in a recent phone interview, she also writes about plain old person-to-person romance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM
The year 1990 was a record year for the Orange County pop music scene--record in the toss-it-on-the-box-and-listen sense of the word. In styles ranging from dance pop to heavy metal, alternative rock to country, locally based artists turned out an unprecedented number of good recordings, a vintage crop of strong new music that isn't likely to be surpassed easily in any coming year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1990 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
In the early 1980s, Rick Elias was the angry young man of San Diego's then-burgeoning original-music scene. While most of the popular local bands were playing crude punk rock, the Rick Elias Band was playing passionate, melodic rock 'n' roll that was a lot more refined and eloquent. Even so, Elias' musical vision was perpetually clouded by tears of rage. His lyrics were bitter and nihilistic. On stage, he'd snarl and he'd scowl. He'd spit and he'd curse.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | MARY LOU FULTON, Times Staff Writer
A fluorescent yellow sign glowed Saturday from Janet Beauty Supply behind the cordoned sidewalks of Uptown Whittier: "Quake Sale--25% Off." Up the street at the Beds and Brass Mattress Outlet, a 10% off "Shake It Up" sale was promoted in script scrawled in spray paint across boarded up windows. And the T-Shirt Shop was open at 8:30 a.m., the first in this town--the place hardest hit by Thursday's earthquake--to sell the inevitable "I Survived the Whittier Earthquake" T-shirts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Jerry Herrera is a tough old prospector whose intuition told him to stake out his claim early. Six years ago, when San Diego's new wave scene was just beginning to sparkle, Herrera was one of the first local club owners to react. Very quickly, he booted out the Top 40 dance bands that had been appearing at the Spirit since he opened the Bay Park nightclub in 1975. He replaced them with an eclectic mix of national and local new wave bands that played only their own music.
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