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Rick Griffin

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NEWS
August 20, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rick Griffin, whose psychedelic posters for concerts by such rock stars as Jimi Hendrix made him famous to one generation and whose illustrations of biblical texts brought him respect from another, is dead. Griffin, 47, died at Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital on Saturday, two days after he suffered extensive head injuries when his motorcycle collided with a van in Petaluma, north of San Francisco. Griffin was not wearing a helmet, the California Highway Patrol reported.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2007 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
Rick Griffin (1944-91) is already an icon several times over: of mid-'60s Southern California surf culture, of late '60s psychedelic graphic design, of the underground comics movement and -- a surprising but not entirely anomalous turn -- of rock 'n' roll evangelicalism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2007 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
Rick Griffin (1944-91) is already an icon several times over: of mid-'60s Southern California surf culture, of late '60s psychedelic graphic design, of the underground comics movement and -- a surprising but not entirely anomalous turn -- of rock 'n' roll evangelicalism.
OPINION
September 5, 2004
From funds for junior college to help for potential homeowners, George Bush ladled on the gravy of a rich nation upon its citizenry (Sept. 3). Lost however in Bush's litany of new goodies was any means to pay for them. If he was the leader he professed to be, the supposed "right man" in this time of national peril, he would call upon all of us to join in some measure of civic sacrifice. Instead we get more from government, with another promise of lower taxes. With deficits rising and the boomer retirement just ahead, true leadership would tap the patriotism he is so good at arousing and put it to the difficult tasks ahead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Surfing used to be illegal in Surf City. "Back in 1956, they didn't want surfing in this town. Man, that was a bad element," said Gordie Duane, who got the first citation for surfing then. But the passage of 40 years has turned Duane from criminal to local hero, and on Friday, he was one of six surfing pioneers inducted into the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame. "They call it local hero. I think it's more like local rebel," Duane, 67, said.
OPINION
September 5, 2004
From funds for junior college to help for potential homeowners, George Bush ladled on the gravy of a rich nation upon its citizenry (Sept. 3). Lost however in Bush's litany of new goodies was any means to pay for them. If he was the leader he professed to be, the supposed "right man" in this time of national peril, he would call upon all of us to join in some measure of civic sacrifice. Instead we get more from government, with another promise of lower taxes. With deficits rising and the boomer retirement just ahead, true leadership would tap the patriotism he is so good at arousing and put it to the difficult tasks ahead.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1992 | CHRIS KRAUL
Stoorza, Ziegaus & Metzger, a large San Diego-based advertising and public relations firm, has acquired Franklin & Associates, also of San Diego, the two companies said Friday. Terms were not disclosed. The merger created what is probably the largest locally based advertising and public relations firm, with about $69 million in combined annual statewide billings, said Gail Stoorza Gill, majority owner and chief executive.
SPORTS
April 23, 2007 | Kevin Baxter, Times Staff Writer
Pete Rose found baseball, at its essence, to be a simple game. "See the ball," he said. "Hit the ball." And nobody did that more often than Rose, the sports' all-time hits leader. But what if you can't see the ball? That happened to Baltimore Orioles outfielder Jay Gibbons. "My vision just went on me all of a sudden," he said. "I was screwed." Same thing with Oakland's Dan Johnson, who accidentally sprayed sunscreen into his right eye last spring and wound up with double vision.
REAL ESTATE
March 30, 1986
Jon B. Hedberg, president of the Pacifica Corp., Westlake Village, has been installed as the new president of the Ventura County chapter of the Building Industry Assn. of Southern California. Other new officers include Rick Niec, Griffin Development, first vice president and legislative chairman; Tom Zanic, Urban West Communities, second vice president; Steve McCollum, McCollum Geotechnical, secretary, and John Markley, Safeco Title Insurance, treasurer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008 | Casey Dolan
Visitors to Jack Gallery in the Farmers Market Plaza might glimpse "trails" and hear keening guitars when they view a new exhibit of lithographs of late-'60s psychedelic-era concert posters that's set to open Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Surfing used to be illegal in Surf City. "Back in 1956, they didn't want surfing in this town. Man, that was a bad element," said Gordie Duane, who got the first citation for surfing then. But the passage of 40 years has turned Duane from criminal to local hero, and on Friday, he was one of six surfing pioneers inducted into the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame. "They call it local hero. I think it's more like local rebel," Duane, 67, said.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rick Griffin, whose psychedelic posters for concerts by such rock stars as Jimi Hendrix made him famous to one generation and whose illustrations of biblical texts brought him respect from another, is dead. Griffin, 47, died at Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital on Saturday, two days after he suffered extensive head injuries when his motorcycle collided with a van in Petaluma, north of San Francisco. Griffin was not wearing a helmet, the California Highway Patrol reported.
NEWS
June 22, 2004 | Jamie Tierney
It's a miscalculation in the cooler-than-jocks conceit of board culture: Surfing once tried to emulate a ball sport. The slip lasted for only a few years when Herbie Fletcher of Astrodeck, a company known for its peel-and-stick traction pad for surfboards and other accessories, packaged a Major League Baseball-style card--180 different ones, in fact -- with every cake of surf wax. Sadly for some, the evidence survives in the display cases of Southern California surf shops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1991 | Tony Perry
Farewell, my bare Diana. Or: the bronze cover-up. When Chris O'Hara and her two children go to Balboa Park, a favorite sight is the statue of "The Youthful Diana" outside the Museum of Art. There she's been for decades--Roman goddess of the moon, protectress of young maidens, her bow pointed to the sky, smile of innocent joy on her youthful face, and, until recently, her lithe body absolutely au naturel. "My children loved it," O'Hara said.
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