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Rick Icaza

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BUSINESS
November 20, 2003 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Can you hear me now? Supermarket union leader Rick Icaza complained Tuesday that chief federal mediator Peter J. Hurtgen did not return his calls that afternoon, as he tried to find out when contract negotiations with the grocery chains might resume. On Wednesday, Icaza said Hurtgen told him there had been a good reason: His cellphone was on the fritz. John Arnold, spokesman for the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, confirmed that Hurtgen's phone had been giving him trouble.
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BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Members of Southern California's grocery union have ratified a new contract with Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons, bringing an end to labor negotiations that dragged on for more than eight months and brought tens of thousands of workers to the verge of a strike. The contract, which union members voted in favor of this weekend, will help ensure that workers at the big three grocery chains will stay on the job and prevent a potentially devastating blow to the state's already shaky economy.
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BUSINESS
September 24, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Members of Southern California's grocery union voted to ratify a new contract with Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons on Saturday night, bringing an end to labor negotiations that dragged on for more than eight months and brought tens of thousands of workers to the verge of a strike. The new contract, said union leaders, will help ensure workers at Ralphs, Albertsons and Vons and Pavilions will stay on the job, and prevent a potentially devastating blow to the state's already shaky economy.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Members of Southern California's grocery union voted to ratify a new contract with Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons on Saturday night, bringing an end to labor negotiations that dragged on for more than eight months and brought tens of thousands of workers to the verge of a strike. The new contract, said union leaders, will help ensure workers at Ralphs, Albertsons and Vons and Pavilions will stay on the job, and prevent a potentially devastating blow to the state's already shaky economy.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Members of Southern California's grocery union have ratified a new contract with Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons, bringing an end to labor negotiations that dragged on for more than eight months and brought tens of thousands of workers to the verge of a strike. The contract, which union members voted in favor of this weekend, will help ensure that workers at the big three grocery chains will stay on the job and prevent a potentially devastating blow to the state's already shaky economy.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1989
James Flanigan, in his Aug. 23 column ("Why Cheers for a Polish Union, Scorn for Ours?"), claims that today's unions are becoming a victim of their own success. The relatively high wages and good benefits unionization has brought make it tougher to organize new workers, he argues; employees don't believe unions can produce anything for them today. Most of my union's 32,000 members are employed in the Los Angeles food industry. They offered views contrary to Flanigan's in recent confidential in-depth surveys conducted by the respected Washington, D.C.-based Wilson Center for Public Research.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Recalling memories of protracted labor talks that led Southern California grocery workers to the picket lines seven years ago, the United Food and Commercial Workers union is holding a strike authorization vote next week and warning its members to be prepared in case they have to walk off the job. A labor contract that was reached in 2007 expired in March 6. It covered about 62,000 grocery workers in Southern California, including those employed...
BUSINESS
June 9, 2011 | By Sharon Bernstein and P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Holding signs that said, "L.A. isn't Wisconsin," representatives of 62,000 unionized grocery store workers said that they could be close to going out on strike against Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons supermarkets. Rick Icaza, president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 770, said at a news conference that the two sides were primarily battling over health coverage. "We're so far apart, if something doesn't happen soon, we will have a strike," Icaza said. The supermarket companies would not comment on what kind of changes they are seeking with regard to employee healthcare.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writers
Retail clerks voted overwhelmingly Thursday to give their union leaders authority to call a strike against six major Southern California chains and announced that the strike would start at the stores of Ralphs Grocery Co. at 12:01 a.m. Saturday if no settlement is reached by then. The two sides are to return to the bargaining table at 10 a.m. today in a last-ditch attempt to forestall a strike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Negotiators for 60,000 Southern California retail clerks and six major grocery chains reported only glacial progress Friday in attempts to reach agreement on a new three-year contract and eliminate the threat of a supermarket strike. Both sides said they are far apart on a number of issues, including job security, pensions and health benefits. Federal mediator Frank Allen was summoned for help several weeks ago, but his attempts to move the talks ahead have not been particularly successful.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | P.J. Huffstutter
In the end, Southern California's big three grocery chains and their unionized workers settled their labor fight because of this economic reality: Another strike would have severely damaged both sides. On Monday, negotiators for Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons and the United Food and Commercial Workers reached a tentative deal, averting a strike that would have sent more than 54,000 workers across Southern California off the job. After months of public posturing and private wrangling, the negotiations grew urgent Sunday evening after a key deadline passed, clearing the way for a labor stoppage at any time.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
This weekend, an estimated 62,000 grocery workers in Southern California will vote — for the second time — on whether to give their union locals the go-ahead to strike. Labor negotiations are dragging into the sixth month between the United Food and Commercial Workers and Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons. Both sides, which continue to meet this week, are trying to hammer out a complete contract offer to present to the workers. Healthcare benefits remain a divisive issue. So do wages and staffing levels.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2011 | By Sharon Bernstein and P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Holding signs that said, "L.A. isn't Wisconsin," representatives of 62,000 unionized grocery store workers said that they could be close to going out on strike against Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons supermarkets. Rick Icaza, president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 770, said at a news conference that the two sides were primarily battling over health coverage. "We're so far apart, if something doesn't happen soon, we will have a strike," Icaza said. The supermarket companies would not comment on what kind of changes they are seeking with regard to employee healthcare.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Three days before a key labor contract expires, negotiations between a grocery workers union and three of the region's leading supermarket chains are going slowly. The sluggish pace has workers recalling memories of protracted talks that led them to the picket lines seven years ago. The contract covers about 62,000 grocery workers in Southern California, including those employed by Ralphs, which is owned by Kroger Co.; Safeway Inc., which owns Vons and Pavilions stores; and Albertsons, which is owned by SuperValu Inc. The current contract ends Sunday night.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2006 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Bloodied by a long strike and lockout that left Southern California supermarket workers with higher health insurance expenses and without regular raises, their union has a new strategy: Divide and conquer. In a departure from previous contract talks, the United Food and Commercial Workers Union plans to negotiate with each major grocery chain separately rather than bargaining with the employers as a group. The current contract expires March 5.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2004 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
As labor's point man in the California supermarket strike, Rick Icaza has been arrested on charges of civil disobedience and shouldered mounting criticism that the union's strategy isn't working. At 70, a multimillionaire from decades of investing in Southern California real estate, he could've retired years ago in comfort. But the union, Icaza says, isn't his job; it's his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and ANNA MACIAS, Times Staff Writers
Retail clerks in San Diego and throughout Southern California voted overwhelmingly Thursday to give their union leaders authority to call a strike against six major grocery chains and announced that the strike would start at Ralphs Grocery Co. stores at 12:01 a.m. Saturday if no settlement is reached by then. The two sides are to return to the bargaining table at 10 a.m. today in a last-ditch attempt to forestall a strike.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2003 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Can you hear me now? Supermarket union leader Rick Icaza complained Tuesday that chief federal mediator Peter J. Hurtgen did not return his calls that afternoon, as he tried to find out when contract negotiations with the grocery chains might resume. On Wednesday, Icaza said Hurtgen told him there had been a good reason: His cellphone was on the fritz. John Arnold, spokesman for the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, confirmed that Hurtgen's phone had been giving him trouble.
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