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Rick Lazio

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NEWS
June 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Despite the departure of Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani from the closely watched U.S. Senate race in New York, Hillary Rodham Clinton has been unable to open up a gap over the Republican opposition, according to three independent polls. When Giuliani pulled out of the race on May 19 to deal with his prostate cancer, Republican leaders put on game faces and predicted that by late summer or early fall their new candidate, Rep. Rick Lazio, would be running even with the first lady.
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NATIONAL
September 28, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
The race to be the next governor of New York became a two-man heat Monday. In one of those the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend moments, Rick Lazio, a former congressman from Long Island, took himself out of the running in order to give "tea party" favorite Carl Paladino a better shot at beating their Democratic rival, state Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo. This month, Lazio lost badly to Paladino for the Republican nomination, yet kept his name on the ballot for the November election as the Conservative Party candidate.
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NATIONAL
September 15, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
New York Republicans have been a party on the verge of extinction for almost a decade. They have virtually nobody in Congress and no power in the state capital. The party is so weak that if it doesn't have a good showing in November it could be left with little representation. So given the choice in the GOP gubernatorial primary Tuesday between a "mad as hell" outsider and a party regular whose day job had been to lobby for Wall Street, New York Republicans turned out in larger than usual numbers to vote for Carl Paladino, the anti-establishment candidate.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
New York Republicans have been a party on the verge of extinction for almost a decade. They have virtually nobody in Congress and no power in the state capital. The party is so weak that if it doesn't have a good showing in November it could be left with little representation. So given the choice in the GOP gubernatorial primary Tuesday between a "mad as hell" outsider and a party regular whose day job had been to lobby for Wall Street, New York Republicans turned out in larger than usual numbers to vote for Carl Paladino, the anti-establishment candidate.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | Associated Press
After months of prodding by journalists and Hillary Rodham Clinton, his Democratic opponent, Rep. Rick Lazio on Monday gave reporters access to his tax returns from the last decade. The Republican congressman and his wife had income of $152,000 in 1999 and paid $22,341 in taxes. At first glance, the federal and state tax returns dating to 1990 didn't appear to contain anything unusual, observers said.
NEWS
July 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Rep. Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.), over the objections of some GOP leaders in New York, has confirmed he will seek the party's nomination for the U.S. Senate seat in which First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton could be the Democratic candidate. The Long Island congressman has been under pressure from some fellow Republicans to drop his interest in contesting a primary for the November 2000 election and pave the way for the expected candidacy of New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | Associated Press
Former Rep. Rick Lazio, who gave up his congressional seat for an unsuccessful Senate bid against Hillary Rodham Clinton in 2000, said Wednesday he will not seek to reclaim his old House seat this year. Lazio said he wants to focus on his family and his work as president and chief executive officer of the Financial Services Forum, a think tank. Republican leaders in Washington and New York had been encouraging Lazio to run for his old seat, now held by Democrat Steve Israel.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Locked in a tight race where every vote could count, Hillary Rodham Clinton accepted the backing of New York's Liberal Party on Saturday while her Republican Senate rival, Rick Lazio, was embraced by the Conservative Party. However, support for Lazio, who favors abortion rights for women, was not unanimous because of his views on the subject. "I'm pro-life . . .
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
Hillary Rodham Clinton made a pilgrimage Saturday to the home of her hero, Eleanor Roosevelt, a former first lady who declined a challenge the current one has taken on--a run for the U.S. Senate from New York. Clinton came to Val-Kill, Roosevelt's cottage home and a national historic site, to announce that $150,000 has been raised through private donations to help with preservation.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
His fresh face marred by a fat lip, Rep. Rick Lazio was nominated by the Republican Party on Tuesday to battle Hillary Rodham Clinton in the nation's most closely watched Senate race. To the cheers of more than 400 delegates and hundreds of other supporters, Lazio--a little-known Long Island congressman who entered the race after New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani withdrew because of prostate cancer--was declared the unanimous pick of the party's state convention.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | Associated Press
Former Rep. Rick Lazio, who gave up his congressional seat for an unsuccessful Senate bid against Hillary Rodham Clinton in 2000, said Wednesday he will not seek to reclaim his old House seat this year. Lazio said he wants to focus on his family and his work as president and chief executive officer of the Financial Services Forum, a think tank. Republican leaders in Washington and New York had been encouraging Lazio to run for his old seat, now held by Democrat Steve Israel.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Senate candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton said Friday that she made a mistake in using a government list of White House party guests to solicit political contributions. "This was my error, absolutely my error," and not that of a campaign staffer, she said at a Manhattan campaign event. Her rival, Republican Rep. Rick Lazio, suggested Friday that either the first lady or her campaign aides had broken the law and should answer for it.
NEWS
October 12, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Rick Lazio toured a Yonkers seniors center recently, the boyish-looking Long Island congressman got enthusiastic support for his Senate race against Hillary Rodham Clinton. Yet few in the room knew anything about his record in Congress or the positions he's running on. "All I know is, he's a real New Yorker," said Josephine Santucci, her voice trailing off. "And he's not her," added Clara Maffucci. "That's really all you need to know."
NEWS
October 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
Hillary Rodham Clinton, facing Republican Rep. Rick Lazio in the second debate of their Senate campaign, took him to task Sunday for what she says is a violation of their agreement to ban outside money from the race. "Last month, Mr. Lazio said this was an issue of trust and character. He was right," Clinton said. "And, if New Yorkers can't trust him to keep his word for 10 days, how can they trust him for six years?"
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
Republican Rick Lazio has found himself in an unexpected Senate campaign dogfight against Hillary Rodham Clinton for traditionally conservative upstate New York. Several recent polls have shown Clinton edging ahead of Lazio statewide and running almost even with him in upstate New York, a danger signal for any Republican. In 1998, then-Republican Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato captured 55% of the upstate vote to Democrat Charles E. Schumer's 45% and still lost the race.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frequently nasty confrontation, Senate candidates Hillary Rodham Clinton and Rep. Rick Lazio traded angry charges Wednesday during a nationally televised debate. But they also touched on issues in their first face-to-face confrontation in New York's hotly contested Senate race. The contest has been deadlocked for months, according to numerous public opinion polls, and both candidates had pledged to discuss substantial issues, such as health care, education, the environment and tax reform.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
Republican Rick Lazio has found himself in an unexpected Senate campaign dogfight against Hillary Rodham Clinton for traditionally conservative upstate New York. Several recent polls have shown Clinton edging ahead of Lazio statewide and running almost even with him in upstate New York, a danger signal for any Republican. In 1998, then-Republican Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato captured 55% of the upstate vote to Democrat Charles E. Schumer's 45% and still lost the race.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Senate candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton said Friday that she made a mistake in using a government list of White House party guests to solicit political contributions. "This was my error, absolutely my error," and not that of a campaign staffer, she said at a Manhattan campaign event. Her rival, Republican Rep. Rick Lazio, suggested Friday that either the first lady or her campaign aides had broken the law and should answer for it.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | From Reuters
President Clinton and his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton, turned a family vacation into a full-fledged campaign swing for the first lady's Senate race Saturday, indulging in old-fashioned politicking by wading through crowds and munching sausage sandwiches at a rural state fair.
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