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Rick Margitza

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Try to imagine a jazz tenor saxophone style that manages to blend elements from Stan Getz and Wayne Shorter with a bit of John Coltrane thrown in for good measure. That's about what one gets from the playing of Rick Margitza. One of the many solid young players who emerged in the late '80s (he played with Miles Davis in 1988), Margitza, 38, has never received the same amount of attention directed at other players in his age range. It's difficult to understand why not.
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WORLD
March 18, 2006 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
The Little Giant comes back to town on a winter day the color of cobblestones. It's a three-hour trip to Paris by car and fast train from the village where he lives southwest of the capital. After a childhood on the South Side of Chicago, a career forged in the smoke and din of jazz dens the world over, he has become a country gentleman. On the phone from his house in the rural Poitou region, he says, "You can't get more country than this."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
All those who feel that contemporary jazz has been plagued by cold precision and dull predictability are hereby referred to this tenor saxophonist/composer. The 28-year-old Detroit native's second recording is an ambitious, and largely successful attempt to reach across established categories in search of an individual voice. Margitza's big, resonant sound is filled with surging emotions on pieces like "Heritage" and "The Old Country."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Try to imagine a jazz tenor saxophone style that manages to blend elements from Stan Getz and Wayne Shorter with a bit of John Coltrane thrown in for good measure. That's about what one gets from the playing of Rick Margitza. One of the many solid young players who emerged in the late '80s (he played with Miles Davis in 1988), Margitza, 38, has never received the same amount of attention directed at other players in his age range. It's difficult to understand why not.
WORLD
March 18, 2006 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
The Little Giant comes back to town on a winter day the color of cobblestones. It's a three-hour trip to Paris by car and fast train from the village where he lives southwest of the capital. After a childhood on the South Side of Chicago, a career forged in the smoke and din of jazz dens the world over, he has become a country gentleman. On the phone from his house in the rural Poitou region, he says, "You can't get more country than this."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
*** Bob Belden, "The Music of Sting," Blue Note. Using Sting's music as the basis for a jazz album is a good idea. Belden's charts for ensembles are first-rate blendings of superb material and beautifully crafted arrangements. Among the best moments are the instrumentals "They Dance Alone" and "Dream of the Blue Turtles," on which Rick Margitza, Joey Calderazzo, Bobby Watson and John Scofield are among the soloists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
*** JOHN FEDCHOCK NEW YORK BIG BAND "On the Edge" Reservoir The name may not be especially familiar, but trombonist John Fedchock has been on the jazz scene for a while, an important contributor to the Woody Herman band in the '80s and the chief arranger for the Herman Herd's last two Grammy-nominated albums.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Maria Schneider's ongoing Monday night appearances at Visiones nightclub in New York, now in their second year, is currently the city's happening big-band event and for good reason. Schneider is writing some of the smartest charts being aired today and assembling many of New York's best young-and-serious musicians to play them. Though recorded in 1992, "Evanescence" paints an accurate picture of Schneider's craftsmanship.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Maria Schneider wanted to be a dancer when she was growing up in the small Minnesota town of Windom. Instead, she became a composer, working primarily in the genre of jazz but never abandoning either her affection or her affinity for dance. On Sunday evening at the Cal State Northridge Performing Arts Center, Schneider also revealed that she hasn't really given up on her physical connection with dance either.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Twins are a jazz rarity. But the novelty that Francois and Louis Moutin are twin brothers fades into the area of intriguing background information after they begin to play. And their performance at the Jazz Bakery on Thursday night had less to do with their fraternal identity than it did with the quality of their music. Two years ago, the Moutins startled Southland jazz listeners with their capacity to match the free-flying improvisations of pianist Martial Solal during his run at the Bakery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
All those who feel that contemporary jazz has been plagued by cold precision and dull predictability are hereby referred to this tenor saxophonist/composer. The 28-year-old Detroit native's second recording is an ambitious, and largely successful attempt to reach across established categories in search of an individual voice. Margitza's big, resonant sound is filled with surging emotions on pieces like "Heritage" and "The Old Country."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
There were several healthy helpings of genuine jazz Sunday at the Hollywood Bowl. There were also a few episodes of wild audience reaction, though for the most part they did not coincide with the moments of musical creativity. The problem that plagues all such celebrations was in evidence again as the Playboy Jazz Festival came to its ninth coda. The frenetic salsa sounds of a band led by the Panamanian singer Ruben Blades evoked near-panic. Beach balls bounced. Security officers pounced.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
Jazz recordings structured around the theme-and-improvised-variations format have been the source of some stunning music, from Louis Armstrong and Coleman Hawkins to Charlie Parker and John Coltrane. But the format has also generated a great deal of far less compelling sounds, especially in recent years, when too many young artists have released albums consisting of little more than lightweight original pieces and stretched-out improvisations.
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