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Rick Marin

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BOOKS
March 16, 2003 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The Devil's Details A History of Footnotes Chuck Zerby Touchstone: 150 pp., $12 paper "The Devil's Details," Chuck Zerby's defense of footnotes, now out in paperback, is both hilarious and instructive. Endangered, if not extinct, footnotes are an important addition, Zerby argues, to nonfiction, fiction and even poetry. Their main job is "to interrupt. Simply interrupt." Though the form may have been diluted, and its integrity compromised, Zerby insists that the footnote "humanizes scholarship."
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NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who has been campaigning furiously in South Carolina in an effort to revive his sputtering presidential campaign, said Sunday morning that the Obama administration has gone “over the top” in criticizing Marines who were videotaped urinating on Afghan corpses. “Obviously, 18, 19-year-olds make stupid mistakes all too often,” Perry said in an appearance on CNN's “State of the Union.” “... What's really disturbing to me is just, kind of, the over-the-top-rhetoric from this administration and their disdain for the military.” The Marines have not been charged with any crimes, but the Geneva Conventions forbid desecration of the dead.
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NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who has been campaigning furiously in South Carolina in an effort to revive his sputtering presidential campaign, said Sunday morning that the Obama administration has gone “over the top” in criticizing Marines who were videotaped urinating on Afghan corpses. “Obviously, 18, 19-year-olds make stupid mistakes all too often,” Perry said in an appearance on CNN's “State of the Union.” “... What's really disturbing to me is just, kind of, the over-the-top-rhetoric from this administration and their disdain for the military.” The Marines have not been charged with any crimes, but the Geneva Conventions forbid desecration of the dead.
BOOKS
March 16, 2003 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The Devil's Details A History of Footnotes Chuck Zerby Touchstone: 150 pp., $12 paper "The Devil's Details," Chuck Zerby's defense of footnotes, now out in paperback, is both hilarious and instructive. Endangered, if not extinct, footnotes are an important addition, Zerby argues, to nonfiction, fiction and even poetry. Their main job is "to interrupt. Simply interrupt." Though the form may have been diluted, and its integrity compromised, Zerby insists that the footnote "humanizes scholarship."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rodney Dangerfield can relate. So far this season, rookie NBC sitcoms "The Single Guy" and "Caroline in the City" rank as the fourth and fifth most popular series on television. Clearly, the audience is watching. But, like Dangerfield, the two shows don't get no respect from most critics and industry insiders. The unanimous refrain: The season has produced no true breakaway hits; these newcomers got lackluster reviews and have garnered great ratings only because of their time slots.
BOOKS
March 9, 2003
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction LAST WEEK WEEKS ON LIST *--* *--* 1 The King of Torts by John Grisham (Doubleday: $27.95) The 1 4 case of a young man charged in a street killing turns out to be tied to a conspiracy involving a pharmaceutical giant 2 The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold (Little, Brown: $21.95) 2 36 A murdered girl tells the story of her grieving family still learning to cope, the killer and the detective who hunts him 3 The Last Detective by Robert Crais (Doubleday: $24.95) 13 2 P.I.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2004 | Nick Charles, Special to The Times
Judging from the success of Bravo's "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy" and the pitifully short, three-episode run of Comedy Central's "Straight Plan for the Gay Man," it would seem the advice highway between the sexual orientations runs just one way: gay to straight. That is, until the wedding bells started chiming. Once marriage licenses started being handed out to same-sex couples in San Francisco and elsewhere, things changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2003 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
Ladies, sheathe your daggers. Rick Marin, the budding Howard Stern of the literary world, is out of the cad business. He was pretty good at it for a while, judging from his new tell-almost-all memoir, "Cad: Confessions of a Toxic Bachelor" (Hyperion), which offers women an entertaining day pass into the scary minds of smarmy single guys. And now he's demonstrating one of his techniques of seduction, which, against all odds, involves his thick-rimmed glasses.
FOOD
March 19, 2003 | Regina Schrambling, Special to The Times
The frenzy feels almost surreal. By 9 o'clock on a Friday night, heads at Jean-Georges Vongerichten's dramatic new restaurant are swiveling as subtly as the Lazy Susans on the bigger tables. There's Tony Roberts on his way out, and Woody Allen just sitting down. In another corner, Vogue's omnivorous food columnist Jeffrey Steingarten is ensconced with an entourage headed by Gourmet's unmistakable editor, Ruth Reichl.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1994 | RICK MARIN
Matt Dillon wanted this movie. Anthony Michael Hall, Eric Stoltz, Ethan Hawke, Stephen Dorff--and River Phoenix, who may have wanted it too much. It's perfect for any ambitious, talented young star who can play conflicted, charming and doomed. The movie is "The Basketball Diaries" and the star is Leonardo DiCaprio. It's based on Jim Carroll's 1978 book of the same name--a memoir of the 43-year-old poet and subculture hero's days as a New York teen-age hoop prodigy and heroin addict.
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