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Rick Nelson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
David Nelson, the elder son of Ozzie and Harriet Nelson and the last surviving member of the family that became an American institution in the 1950s and '60s as the stars of the classic TV sitcom "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet," died Tuesday. He was 74. Nelson died at his Century City home of complications from colon cancer, said publicist Dale Olson. "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" began on radio in 1944, focusing on the home life of bandleader Ozzie Nelson and his vocalist wife, Harriet Hilliard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | Devin Kelly, Los Angeles Times
Don Nelson, a screenwriter, film producer and musician who co-wrote scripts for "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" - the classic American television series centered on his brother Ozzie's family - as well as for more than two dozen other films and TV series, has died. He was 86. Nelson, who had Parkinson's disease, died of an aortic aneurysm Tuesday at his home in Studio City, said his wife, Marilyn. As a staff writer for "Ozzie and Harriet," one of the longest-running family comedies in TV history, Nelson came up with Ricky Nelson's trademark catchphrase "I don't mess around, boy," and contributed to more than 200 episodes of the series with storylines anchored famously on the harmless.
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NEWS
May 29, 1987 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
The airplane crash that killed singer Rick Nelson and six others was caused by a fire that started in the cabin but apparently was not ignited by passengers using drugs, National Transportation Safety Board investigators said Thursday after an 18-month probe. Federal investigators said they could not determine conclusively the cause of the blaze, which filled the cabin and cockpit with smoke, but added that a likely source was a heater that reportedly had caused problems during the flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
David Nelson, the elder son of Ozzie and Harriet Nelson and the last surviving member of the family that became an American institution in the 1950s and '60s as the stars of the classic TV sitcom "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet," died Tuesday. He was 74. Nelson died at his Century City home of complications from colon cancer, said publicist Dale Olson. "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" began on radio in 1944, focusing on the home life of bandleader Ozzie Nelson and his vocalist wife, Harriet Hilliard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1986
I drove my Mustang at 5 in the morning to Pasadena for the parade when I heard over the radio, "Rick Nelson has been killed in a plane crash in Texas." The rock music came on again. I couldn't believe it. Tears came to my eyes. Then, I thought, "What's wrong with you? You don't even know him!" But I do! I grew up with Ozzie and Harriet. All of us baby-boomers did. I'd watch them on television and laugh after a hard day at school. Rick and Dave were like my brothers. Then, later, a crush.
NEWS
July 29, 1986 | Associated Press
The flight crew of a chartered DC-3 that crashed New Year's Eve, killing singer Rick Nelson and six others, encountered repeated problems with a cabin heater shortly before fire erupted aboard the plane, according to documents released today by federal investigators. At one point, the documents showed, co-pilot Kenneth Ferguson told investigators he became "nervous" about the heater problems and refused a request by the pilot to turn it back on.
NEWS
January 7, 1986 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
Rick Nelson, the boy-next-door who grew up on his family's television show and became a teen-age rock 'n' roll idol, was eulogized Monday as a humorous but sensitive artist. Nelson, 45, his fiance, Helen Blair, 27, and five band members were killed in the New Year's Eve crash of a DC-3 in northeast Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seems impossible to believe, 45 years later, that Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, Chuck Berry and other early rockers were viewed by adults as hellions unleashed by Satan to corrupt America's youth. Yet it was a pivotal moment in the evolution of rock 'n' roll when Ed Sullivan, the nation's arbiter of culture for the masses, pronounced Presley "a real decent, fine boy" to his millions of viewers in 1956 after one of Presley's appearances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1986 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators waited Thursday to interview an injured pilot and co-pilot in an effort to learn what caused the northeast Texas plane crash that killed singer Rick Nelson, his fiancee, four members of his band and his soundman on New Year's Eve. Friends and relatives of some of the dead band members said the DC-3, reportedly more than 40 years old, had been beset by engine troubles for several months.
NEWS
January 1, 1986 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Rick Nelson, who grew up in millions of American living rooms on his parents' "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" television show and then became a teen-age rock 'n' roll idol, was killed with six others Tuesday in the crash of a plane carrying his band to a New Year's Eve concert in Dallas. Only the pilot and co-pilot survived as the private DC-3 went down in woods just short of an airport runway near the rural community of De Kalb, Tex., in the extreme northeast corner of the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Tom Brumley, a legendary steel guitarist who contributed to the "Bakersfield sound" of Buck Owens and the Buckaroos in the 1960s before spending 10 years performing with Rick Nelson, has died. He was 73. Brumley died Tuesday at Northeast Baptist Hospital in San Antonio, eight days after suffering a heart attack, said his wife, Rolene Brumley.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2005 | Charles Duhigg, Times Staff Writer
Twenty years to the week after his death, Ricky Nelson is rocking again. Starting today music giant EMI Group is launching a fresh collection of Nelson's greatest hits, part of a larger effort to sell a new generation of music fans on artists popular with their parents -- maybe even their grandparents.
REAL ESTATE
March 31, 2002 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actress Helen Hunt has listed her newly built, Hollywood Hills home on 10 acres at $8.9 million. About three acres of the site had been swashbuckling actor Errol Flynn's estate until he died in 1959. The Flynn estate was later owned by singer-actor Rick Nelson. Before Hunt bought the site in 1997, Flynn's house, the scene of many Hollywood parties, had been razed. Hunt, who married actor Hank Azaria in 1999, started to build a family home. However, after she filed for divorce in December 2000, the home being built on the site seemed too large for her, particularly since Hunt spends a lot of time in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Matthew and Gunnar Nelson, the twin sons of '50s TV and rock heartthrob Rick Nelson, played a show recently that carried an overwhelming sense of deja vu, once removed. They'd been invited to headline a songwriters' showcase for a group of TV music directors, yet they were treated rudely by the evening's other performers because of their history as teen heartthrobs in their early-'90s pop-metal band, Nelson.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seems impossible to believe, 45 years later, that Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, Chuck Berry and other early rockers were viewed by adults as hellions unleashed by Satan to corrupt America's youth. Yet it was a pivotal moment in the evolution of rock 'n' roll when Ed Sullivan, the nation's arbiter of culture for the masses, pronounced Presley "a real decent, fine boy" to his millions of viewers in 1956 after one of Presley's appearances.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"You can't please everyone, so you gotta please yourself," quips the title figure of "Rick Nelson: Original Teen Idol," quoting his own 1972 comeback triumph hit. It's New Year's Eve 1985, he's long past his glory years, has just relived his "Ozzie & Harriet" past with a scrapbook-toting obsessive fan and he's about to board the plane in which he--as we, the viewers know--will perish minutes later. Please yourself?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1998 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fame and fortune are nice distractions, but the lasting value of popular music is most often found in the barest of essentials, in this case, songwriting. Steve McClintock, Karen Staley and the Nelson brothers joined forces in an evening on the subject hosted by Victoria Shaw.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Matthew and Gunnar Nelson became teen-pop sensations in 1990, they were tracing the footsteps of their father, the original rock 'n' roll pop teen idol. But, pointedly, the twins were not taking their cues from Rick Nelson's music. "Nobody does Rick Nelson better than Rick Nelson," Gunnar said in a 1991 interview with The Times. "The man is dead; let him lie. If [people] want heritage, they go out and buy my dad's records."
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