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Rick Reynolds

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
If "Only the Truth Is Funny," why does it hurt so much? Axiomatic, my dear whoever. Ask Rick Reynolds. Better yet, see his show, written, directed, performed and lived by him. Every living-color moment of it. Who is this Rick Reynolds, you ask? Just a guy who decided to give up stand-up comedy when he'd had it up to here and talk about himself instead. Don't you try it, but it sure is paying off for him. And for us.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Who would you rather be--the happy kid in your high school yearbook photo or the mature, responsible adult you are today? That question provides the launch pad for another devastatingly funny, incisive and courageously soul-baring monologue from Rick Reynolds, who in his 40s finds himself "All Grown Up . . . and no place to go."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Who would you rather be--the happy kid in your high school yearbook photo or the mature, responsible adult you are today? That question provides the launch pad for another devastatingly funny, incisive and courageously soul-baring monologue from Rick Reynolds, who in his 40s finds himself "All Grown Up . . . and no place to go."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1994 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the '80s comedy boom, no one knows how many stand-ups are milling around out there in the crepuscular land of the Promising Unknown, smoothing their TV and movie pitches while awaiting their big break. But if anyone was touted as a sure thing, it was comedian Rick Reynolds, whose career has been something of a show-biz allegory: First, dazzling success. Then, crushing disappointment. And now? The story's still in development.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1994 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the '80s comedy boom, no one knows how many stand-ups are milling around out there in the crepuscular land of the Promising Unknown, smoothing their TV and movie pitches while awaiting their big break. But if anyone was touted as a sure thing, it was comedian Rick Reynolds, whose career has been something of a show-biz allegory: First, dazzling success. Then, crushing disappointment. And now? The story's still in development.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1990 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Jack Rollins and Charles Joffe have been close friends and business associates for 38 years. For much of that time they had been part of a comedy management team (with Buddy Morra, Larry Brezner and David Steinberg) that handled, as the saying goes, some of the biggest names in the business. Then the firm broke up. Like the consigliore in "The Godfather," Rollins and Joffe each became content serving a single client.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Tough to tell the hour when fame and fortune, like lightning, strikes. The oatmeal advocate Wilford Brimley made it to Hollywood with a measured amount of maturity. Another advocate of a sort, Ruth Westheimer, did the same. And not to be forgotten, Clara Peller, who found late-in-life acclaim asking about the organic structure of hamburger.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Fun With Rick: Comedian Rick Reynolds' one-man show, "Only the Truth Is Funny," is due at the Canon Theatre in Beverly Hills on Sept. 15. The "unabashedly autobiographical" show had successful runs in San Francisco in 1990 and at New York's Westside Theatre this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Now for comedies that didn't make the regular season. Sometimes justifiably, as with "Life . . . and Stuff," the drearily derivative sitcom that CBS is playing off during the languid summer weeks after May's ratings sweeps. It's yet another series drawn from stand-up comedy material. The source of the one-liners this time is comic Rick Reynolds, who plays advertising executive Rick Boswell, someone who shares with his wife, Ronnie, played by Pam Dawber, a feeling of being overwhelmed by life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1997
Here are some of the other Times reviewers' favorite productions from the past year, listed in alphabetical order. Because of the enormous number of professional productions in the area, no reviewer saw all the contenders. DON SHIRLEY "Design for Living," A Noise Within "Golden Child," South Coast Repertory "Good as New," South Coast Repertory "How the Other Half Loves," South Coast Repertory "A Midsummer Night's Dream," Farthest Steppe Productions at Stella Adler Theatre "Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Tough to tell the hour when fame and fortune, like lightning, strikes. The oatmeal advocate Wilford Brimley made it to Hollywood with a measured amount of maturity. Another advocate of a sort, Ruth Westheimer, did the same. And not to be forgotten, Clara Peller, who found late-in-life acclaim asking about the organic structure of hamburger.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
If "Only the Truth Is Funny," why does it hurt so much? Axiomatic, my dear whoever. Ask Rick Reynolds. Better yet, see his show, written, directed, performed and lived by him. Every living-color moment of it. Who is this Rick Reynolds, you ask? Just a guy who decided to give up stand-up comedy when he'd had it up to here and talk about himself instead. Don't you try it, but it sure is paying off for him. And for us.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1990 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Jack Rollins and Charles Joffe have been close friends and business associates for 38 years. For much of that time they had been part of a comedy management team (with Buddy Morra, Larry Brezner and David Steinberg) that handled, as the saying goes, some of the biggest names in the business. Then the firm broke up. Like the consigliore in "The Godfather," Rollins and Joffe each became content serving a single client.
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