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Rick Rhoden

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SPORTS
June 1, 1994 | Times staff writer David W. Myers catches up with former Dodgers and Angels
Rhoden overcame a serious bone disease as a child and made his major league debut with the Dodgers in 1974. An All-Star in 1976, his 16-10 record in '77 and 10-8 mark in '78 helped the club win back-to-back league championships. Traded to Pittsburgh at the start of the 1979 season for pitcher Jerry Reuss, he retired in 1989 with a 151-125 lifetime mark. Winner of more than $100,000 in celebrity golf tournaments last year, Rhoden, 41, lives in Ormand Beach, Fla.
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SPORTS
July 5, 2001 | THOMAS BONK
The best celebrity golfer in the U.S. is Rick Rhoden, and if you don't believe it, he's going to throw a fastball under your chin. When he pitched for the Dodgers, Rhoden had enough time during spring training to work his game down to a two handicap. Now, at 48, Rhoden is a scratch golfer or better who absolutely owns the celebrity golf circuit filled by athletes from fields of play besides golf. Rhoden has won 37 celebrity tournaments and more than $1.
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SPORTS
March 17, 1987
Right-hander Rick Rhoden, penciled in to start for the New York Yankees in the American League season opener against Detroit April 6, suffered a pulled muscle in his lower back during an exhibition game.
SPORTS
June 1, 1994 | Times staff writer David W. Myers catches up with former Dodgers and Angels
Rhoden overcame a serious bone disease as a child and made his major league debut with the Dodgers in 1974. An All-Star in 1976, his 16-10 record in '77 and 10-8 mark in '78 helped the club win back-to-back league championships. Traded to Pittsburgh at the start of the 1979 season for pitcher Jerry Reuss, he retired in 1989 with a 151-125 lifetime mark. Winner of more than $100,000 in celebrity golf tournaments last year, Rhoden, 41, lives in Ormand Beach, Fla.
SPORTS
January 11, 1989 | Associated Press
The New York Yankees traded right-hander Rick Rhoden Tuesday to the Houston Astros for three minor leaguers. Going to the Yankees were outfielder John Fishel, right-hander Pedro DeLeon and left-hander Mike Hook. Rhoden, 35, had a 12-12 record and a 4.20 earned-run average in 30 starts with the Yankees last season. Fishel, who had 18 home runs for triple-A Tucson last season, has been assigned to the Yankees' 40-player roster.
SPORTS
February 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Right-handed pitchers Charlie Hudson and Cecilio Guante, both acquired in off-season trades, have signed one-year, non-guaranteed contracts, the New York Yankees announced. Salary terms were not disclosed, but both players had filed for salary arbitration, and have thus avoided arbitration hearings. Hudson, obtained from Philadelphia last month for outfielder Mike Easler and infielder Tommy Barrett, had a 7-10 record with a 4.94 earned run average last year.
SPORTS
August 12, 1986 | Associated Press
Jim Morrison said he wasn't upset when he was lifted for a pinch batter in the 17th inning of the suspended game, before Barry Bonds delivered a game-winning single in a 10-8 victory. Morrison came back in the regularly scheduled game with four hits including a home run Monday to lead the Pittsburgh Pirates and Rick Rhoden to a 10-7 victory over the Chicago Cubs. "I understand, I figured it was going to come," said Morrison. "Barry made the most of it. It was good for Barry to get the hit."
SPORTS
May 21, 1987
Mike Schmidt told Jayson Stark of the Philadelphia Inquirer: "If everyone pitched like Mike Scott, you'd make a lot of money being a .200 hitter." He's not worrying about Scott scuffing the ball, however. "Hey, I hit Gaylord Perry better than any man alive," he said. He added: "I'll tell you a story about one guy, now that he's out of the league. My 494th home run ball has got a slash right between the seams. It's got a scrape on it. Here, I'll show you."
SPORTS
June 7, 1986 | DAN HAFNER
The Pirates and the Mets split Friday night, Pittsburgh winning a brawl game in the opener and New York taking a more conventional ball game in the nightcap. Shortly after a free-for-all in the fifth inning of the first game of the doubleheader at Pittsburgh, rookie Barry Bonds hit a two-run home run, and the lowly Pirates went on to score a 7-1 victory. But in a relatively calm second game, the Mets came back to win, 10-4.
SPORTS
January 11, 1989 | Associated Press
The New York Yankees traded right-hander Rick Rhoden Tuesday to the Houston Astros for three minor leaguers. Going to the Yankees were outfielder John Fishel, right-hander Pedro DeLeon and left-hander Mike Hook. Rhoden, 35, had a 12-12 record and a 4.20 earned-run average in 30 starts with the Yankees last season. Fishel, who had 18 home runs for triple-A Tucson last season, has been assigned to the Yankees' 40-player roster.
SPORTS
June 3, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
They used to say that Rick Rhoden was one of those lucky few who were able to combine a hobby--in this case, carpentry--with their work. Rhoden is a major league pitcher, and, for years, one of the great rumors around the National League was that sandpaper was his best friend. It was thought that Rhoden had never met a baseball he wouldn't scuff. But that was before 1987. Rhoden now pitches for the New York Yankees and, since switching leagues, he has changed his act.
SPORTS
May 21, 1987
Mike Schmidt told Jayson Stark of the Philadelphia Inquirer: "If everyone pitched like Mike Scott, you'd make a lot of money being a .200 hitter." He's not worrying about Scott scuffing the ball, however. "Hey, I hit Gaylord Perry better than any man alive," he said. He added: "I'll tell you a story about one guy, now that he's out of the league. My 494th home run ball has got a slash right between the seams. It's got a scrape on it. Here, I'll show you."
SPORTS
March 17, 1987
Right-hander Rick Rhoden, penciled in to start for the New York Yankees in the American League season opener against Detroit April 6, suffered a pulled muscle in his lower back during an exhibition game.
SPORTS
February 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Right-handed pitchers Charlie Hudson and Cecilio Guante, both acquired in off-season trades, have signed one-year, non-guaranteed contracts, the New York Yankees announced. Salary terms were not disclosed, but both players had filed for salary arbitration, and have thus avoided arbitration hearings. Hudson, obtained from Philadelphia last month for outfielder Mike Easler and infielder Tommy Barrett, had a 7-10 record with a 4.94 earned run average last year.
SPORTS
June 3, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
They used to say that Rick Rhoden was one of those lucky few who were able to combine a hobby--in this case, carpentry--with their work. Rhoden is a major league pitcher, and, for years, one of the great rumors around the National League was that sandpaper was his best friend. It was thought that Rhoden had never met a baseball he wouldn't scuff. But that was before 1987. Rhoden now pitches for the New York Yankees and, since switching leagues, he has changed his act.
SPORTS
July 5, 2001 | THOMAS BONK
The best celebrity golfer in the U.S. is Rick Rhoden, and if you don't believe it, he's going to throw a fastball under your chin. When he pitched for the Dodgers, Rhoden had enough time during spring training to work his game down to a two handicap. Now, at 48, Rhoden is a scratch golfer or better who absolutely owns the celebrity golf circuit filled by athletes from fields of play besides golf. Rhoden has won 37 celebrity tournaments and more than $1.
SPORTS
August 12, 1986 | Associated Press
Jim Morrison said he wasn't upset when he was lifted for a pinch batter in the 17th inning of the suspended game, before Barry Bonds delivered a game-winning single in a 10-8 victory. Morrison came back in the regularly scheduled game with four hits including a home run Monday to lead the Pittsburgh Pirates and Rick Rhoden to a 10-7 victory over the Chicago Cubs. "I understand, I figured it was going to come," said Morrison. "Barry made the most of it. It was good for Barry to get the hit."
SPORTS
June 7, 1986 | DAN HAFNER
The Pirates and the Mets split Friday night, Pittsburgh winning a brawl game in the opener and New York taking a more conventional ball game in the nightcap. Shortly after a free-for-all in the fifth inning of the first game of the doubleheader at Pittsburgh, rookie Barry Bonds hit a two-run home run, and the lowly Pirates went on to score a 7-1 victory. But in a relatively calm second game, the Mets came back to win, 10-4.
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