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Rick Rogers

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NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
The University of Tennessee has suspended standout wide receiver Da'Rick Rogers for an unspecified violation of team rules and, according to Coach Derek Dooley, he probably won't play at all this season. "Junior wide receiver Da'Rick Rogers does not appear on the depth chart for the N.C. State game, as he has been suspended indefinitely because of a violation of team rules. His status for the remainder of the season is yet to be determined," was the statement the school released on the matter.
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NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
The University of Tennessee has suspended standout wide receiver Da'Rick Rogers for an unspecified violation of team rules and, according to Coach Derek Dooley, he probably won't play at all this season. "Junior wide receiver Da'Rick Rogers does not appear on the depth chart for the N.C. State game, as he has been suspended indefinitely because of a violation of team rules. His status for the remainder of the season is yet to be determined," was the statement the school released on the matter.
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NATIONAL
January 18, 2010 | By Alana Semuels
In the clear blue water 150 feet down, off Palemano Point on Hawaii's Big Island, Captain Rick Rogers swam along the ocean floor, concentrating on the light white swirls of staghorn reef below him. As tiny bubbles of air escaped from his tank, his black flippers propelled him above the coral, next to schools of reddish mempache and juicy turquoise uhu fish. The scene was breathtaking, but Rogers didn't care about nature. He was looking for man-made objects only: porcelain plates, pieces of cannons, a sunken iron anchor.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2010 | By Alana Semuels
In the clear blue water 150 feet down, off Palemano Point on Hawaii's Big Island, Captain Rick Rogers swam along the ocean floor, concentrating on the light white swirls of staghorn reef below him. As tiny bubbles of air escaped from his tank, his black flippers propelled him above the coral, next to schools of reddish mempache and juicy turquoise uhu fish. The scene was breathtaking, but Rogers didn't care about nature. He was looking for man-made objects only: porcelain plates, pieces of cannons, a sunken iron anchor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1988
A deer hunter trapped on a ledge 600 feet above the canyon floor was rescued early Sunday by sheriff's deputies using ropes and lights, authorities said. Rick Rogers, 36, of Laguna Hills suffered only minor injuries to one leg and did not require hospitalization, county Sheriff's Lt. Larry Abbott said. After a day of hunting, Rogers was hiking down a mountainside about 3 miles up the canyon from the Silverado Canyon Road gate when he became stranded on a cliff as night fell, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1997 | SCOTT STEEPLETON
An early morning raid by police and probation officials Thursday resulted in the arrest of nine people on charges ranging from drug possession to witness intimidation, authorities said. The sweep of 27 locations conducted by Simi Valley police officers and officials from the Ventura County Probation Department targeted suspected gang members and people who had violated parole, said Simi Valley Police Chief Randy Adams.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | DICK RORABACK
For one thing, they're prettier than moths. For another, butterflies have little knobs on the ends of their antennae. Butterflies fly by day, moths by night. Butterflies don't eat your sweater. They spin chrysalises, which sound a lot nicer than cocoons. And nobody--at least nobody in Southern California--goes on a Moth Count. They went looking for butterflies the other day, the yearly Butterfly Count on Palos Verdes Peninsula, where they tend to do things like that.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Randy Emon had already fast-forwarded his copy of "Blood Sucking Freaks" to the good part. The video flickered across the four color television monitors just as the film's bumbling investigator discovered a cage full of naked women being held captive by a demonic cult leader. The sleuth opened the cell door, only to be devoured--literally--by the carnivorous females he had freed.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Randy Emon had already fast-forwarded his copy of "Blood Sucking Freaks" to the good part. The video flickered across the four color television monitors just as the film's bumbling investigator discovered a cage full of naked women being held captive by a demonic cult leader. The sleuth opened the cell door, only to be devoured--literally--by the carnivorous females he had freed.
MAGAZINE
June 6, 1999
Ann W. O'Neill writes such a wonderful fairy tale about Susan McDougal ("Steel Magnolia," May 9), but as to the facts: --Prior to McDougal's conviction for multiple felonies by 12 jurors in Little Rock, Ark., McDougal asked special prosecutor Kenneth Starr for full immunity in exchange for turning state's evidence. Starr refused. --The Arkansas jury concluded that McDougal was a knowing participant in an illegal scheme to steal $300,000 from the American taxpayers. She was convicted by a unanimous jury--not by Starr--of mail fraud, misapplication of funds and making false entries and statements.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Randy Emon had already fast-forwarded his copy of "Blood Sucking Freaks" to the good part. The video flickered across the four color television monitors just as the film's bumbling investigator discovered a cage full of naked women being held captive by a demonic cult leader. The sleuth opened the cell door, only to be devoured--literally--by the carnivorous females he had freed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1994 | NONA YATES
Nursery Nature Walks, an environmental education organization that introduces infants, young children and their families to nature, will be holding its fifth annual Kids Nature Festival on Saturday in Temescal Gateway Park. The festival will feature concerts, puppet shows, a "bat lady," undersea adventures and many environmental booths. Also on hand will be live owls, turtles, raccoons, lambs and lizards. Activities are designed for children, from infants to age 8, and their families.
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