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Rick Schmidlin

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, Bill Desowitz is a frequent contributor to Calendar
How do you reconstruct "Greed," the most notoriously mutilated masterpiece in film history, without the rest of Erich von Stroheim's grim tapestry of love, fate, heredity and lust for gold in San Francisco of the 1920s? Simple.
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NEWS
October 27, 2002 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
In the mid-1960s, a vault fire at the old MGM studio in Culver City destroyed the only known print of the 1927 Lon Chaney thriller "London After Midnight." The whodunit vampire flick was the most successful of the 10 collaborations between the Man of a Thousand Faces and director Tod Browning. And that, it seemed, was that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Greed," Erich von Stroheim's 1924 mutilated masterpiece, stands as Hollywood's archetypal example of art destroyed by commerce. Stroheim had the audacity to bring Frank Norris' Zolaesque 1899 novel "McTeague" to the screen for the Goldwyn Co. as a 9 1/2-hour epic. In a singular stroke of bad luck for Stroheim, during the film's production Goldwyn merged with Metro to become Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. It was to bring the director into a confrontation with the new studio's chief, Louis B.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Around 1895, Thomas Edison's talented assistant, William Dickson, made movie history in West Orange, N.J., when he successfully recorded sound and moving image in synchronization for the first time. Since the test was never intended for commercial distribution and never copyrighted, it has no formal title. Still, it is well-known to film historians.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Around 1895, Thomas Edison's talented assistant, William Dickson, made movie history in West Orange, N.J., when he successfully recorded sound and moving image in synchronization for the first time. Since the test was never intended for commercial distribution and never copyrighted, it has no formal title. Still, it is well-known to film historians.
NEWS
October 27, 2002 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
In the mid-1960s, a vault fire at the old MGM studio in Culver City destroyed the only known print of the 1927 Lon Chaney thriller "London After Midnight." The whodunit vampire flick was the most successful of the 10 collaborations between the Man of a Thousand Faces and director Tod Browning. And that, it seemed, was that.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1998
While not wishing in any way to diminish Rick Schmidlin's accomplishment in attempting to reconstruct Orson Welles' "Touch of Evil" ("Orson Welles Gets Final Cut--at Last," Jan. 31), I would like to amend his comment: "I even discovered some lost documents at USC." When Schmidlin called the USC Cinema-Television library to ask what we had on "Touch of Evil," one of our archivists, Ned Comstock, amazed him by simply presenting him with the so-called lost production files and memos. Like many documents contained in the archives at USC and other universities, the Welles materials were not lost but waiting for some scholar to express an interest in them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Out of Sight," director Steven Soderbergh's romantic crime caper, won three major awards, including best picture of 1998, on Sunday from the National Society of Film Critics. Soderbergh was named best director for the film, which starred George Clooney and Jennifer Lopez, and Scott Frank won for his screenplay, based on the Elmore Leonard novel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Insider," a drama about the relationship between a "60 Minutes" producer and a tobacco executive turned whistle-blower, was voted best picture of 1999 on Saturday by the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. The Michael Mann-directed film, which stars Al Pacino as producer Lowell Bergman and Russell Crowe as whistle-blower Jeffrey Wigand, was the big winner Saturday, receiving four of the critics' awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Greed," Erich von Stroheim's 1924 mutilated masterpiece, stands as Hollywood's archetypal example of art destroyed by commerce. Stroheim had the audacity to bring Frank Norris' Zolaesque 1899 novel "McTeague" to the screen for the Goldwyn Co. as a 9 1/2-hour epic. In a singular stroke of bad luck for Stroheim, during the film's production Goldwyn merged with Metro to become Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. It was to bring the director into a confrontation with the new studio's chief, Louis B.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, Bill Desowitz is a frequent contributor to Calendar
How do you reconstruct "Greed," the most notoriously mutilated masterpiece in film history, without the rest of Erich von Stroheim's grim tapestry of love, fate, heredity and lust for gold in San Francisco of the 1920s? Simple.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2000
When I produced the re-edit of "Touch of Evil" a few years ago, I had the privilege of using the research library at Universal ("A Collection Gets Shelved," by Amy Wallace, March 5). This wonderful resource was able to give me invaluable help in my research. Their help in putting together material in regard to Orson Welles and "Touch of Evil" led me to some major discoveries that greatly aided the academic accuracy that I needed. The staff that helped me was as professional and educated as any I have ever encountered.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
Perhaps the most surprising thing about Orson Welles' 1958 "Touch of Evil" is the way it continues to surprise. No amount of repeated viewings can dull the edge of its sinister ambience or soften the visual excitement Welles brought to this quintessentially cinematic film.
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