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SPORTS
March 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
A moose knocked four-time winner Rick Swenson out of the lead of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race today, stomping through his team and slowing him enough to allow defending champion Joe Runyan to move in front. Swenson had left McGrath hours before anyone else, but he turned back after the run-in with the moose and waited for other racers to try their luck with the animal. A veterinarian checked out one of Swenson's injured dogs, which was pronounced fit.
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SPORTS
March 6, 1996 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rick Swenson, the only five-time champion of the Iditarod sled dog race, was ejected from the race after one of his dogs died, a decision that drew angry protests Tuesday in Anchorage. Swenson was disqualified Monday for violating the "expired dog rule" that was introduced this year in response to criticism from animal-rights groups. The rule is designed to protect the more than 1,000 dogs in the mushing marathon. Last year, two dogs died during the 1,150-mile race from Anchorage to Nome.
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SPORTS
March 16, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rick Swenson won the 1,163-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race for a record fifth time, taking advantage of a blizzard to beat four-time winner Susan Butcher.
SPORTS
March 16, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rick Swenson won the 1,163-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race for a record fifth time, taking advantage of a blizzard to beat four-time winner Susan Butcher.
SPORTS
March 13, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Defending champion Susan Butcher pushed up the Bering Sea coast in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, but Rick Swenson was close behind as the leaders neared Nome. Butcher pulled into Shaktoolik checkpoint, 934 miles into the 1,163-mile race, about 90 minutes ahead of Swenson. Each is seeking a record fifth title.
SPORTS
March 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Breaking out of Finger Lake before an eruption by Redoubt Volcano showered the trail with sled-slowing ash, four-time champion Rick Swenson was the first musher in the Iditarod sled dog race to top the towering Alaska Range today. Swenson declared his mandatory 24-hour layover after reaching the 3,500-foot pass, the highest point on the trail, but it wasn't immediately certain that he actually would take it, said race spokeswoman Theresa Daily.
SPORTS
March 15, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Four-time winner Rick Swenson pushed through a blizzard Thursday to take the lead in the home stretch of the 1,163-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race from Anchorage to Nome. As Swenson neared the last race checkpoint, he flashed a "thumbs up" sign to passing snowmobilers. Several other leaders remained stormbound miles behind. The finish line was only 22 miles away. Earlier in the day, extreme blizzard conditions forced Swenson to take shelter in an abandoned cabin.
SPORTS
March 15, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Four-time winner Rick Swenson pushed through a blizzard Thursday to take the lead in the home stretch of the 1,163-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race from Anchorage to Nome. As Swenson neared the last race checkpoint, he flashed a "thumbs up" sign to passing snowmobilers. Several other leaders remained stormbound miles behind. The finish line was only 22 miles away. Earlier in the day, extreme blizzard conditions forced Swenson to take shelter in an abandoned cabin.
SPORTS
March 13, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Defending champion Susan Butcher pushed up the Bering Sea coast in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, but Rick Swenson was close behind as the leaders neared Nome. Butcher pulled into Shaktoolik checkpoint, 934 miles into the 1,163-mile race, about 90 minutes ahead of Swenson. Each is seeking a record fifth title.
SPORTS
March 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
A moose knocked four-time winner Rick Swenson out of the lead of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race today, stomping through his team and slowing him enough to allow defending champion Joe Runyan to move in front. Swenson had left McGrath hours before anyone else, but he turned back after the run-in with the moose and waited for other racers to try their luck with the animal. A veterinarian checked out one of Swenson's injured dogs, which was pronounced fit.
SPORTS
March 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Breaking out of Finger Lake before an eruption by Redoubt Volcano showered the trail with sled-slowing ash, four-time champion Rick Swenson was the first musher in the Iditarod sled dog race to top the towering Alaska Range today. Swenson declared his mandatory 24-hour layover after reaching the 3,500-foot pass, the highest point on the trail, but it wasn't immediately certain that he actually would take it, said race spokeswoman Theresa Daily.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | Associated Press
With a headlong rush that started in Unalakleet, Susan Butcher charged across the finish line and into the history books early today in the fastest-ever Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race from Anchorage to Nome. Flushed and perspiring after setting a record-breaking pace to win the 1,158-mile race, Butcher put an end to her history of near-wins in the Iditarod. Twice, she has finished in second place.
SPORTS
March 6, 1996 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rick Swenson, the only five-time champion of the Iditarod sled dog race, was ejected from the race after one of his dogs died, a decision that drew angry protests Tuesday in Anchorage. Swenson was disqualified Monday for violating the "expired dog rule" that was introduced this year in response to criticism from animal-rights groups. The rule is designed to protect the more than 1,000 dogs in the mushing marathon. Last year, two dogs died during the 1,150-mile race from Anchorage to Nome.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | Associated Press
With a headlong rush that started in Unalakleet, Susan Butcher charged across the finish line and into the history books early today in the fastest-ever Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race from Anchorage to Nome. Flushed and perspiring after setting a record-breaking pace to win the 1,158-mile race, Butcher put an end to her history of near-wins in the Iditarod. Twice, she has finished in second place.
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