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Rick Wakeman

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1985
I wish to commend The Times on its excellent review of Rick Wakeman's recent concert at the Beverly Theatre. The musical insights were nothing short of brilliant, and the analysis of Wakeman's keyboard technique exhibited the breadth and depth of knowledge so characteristic of The Times' rock reviews. I only hope you devote as much space to Wakeman's concert on Oct. 16 at Fender's. BENTLEY LITTLE Fullerton We can't review every popster who comes into town, but if Wakeman linked up with Bruce S., well.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walking in the footsteps of Bach and Handel is nothing new for Rick Wakeman. As a member of the British progressive-rock band Yes during the early 1970s, he literally helped key a new way of rocking that incorporated the grand sweep and instrumental virtuosity of classical music. In Yes, and in a subsequent series of solo concept albums on historical and literary themes, Wakeman may have borrowed a few licks from classical composers for his flashy sallies on an array of keyboard instruments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walking in the footsteps of Bach and Handel is nothing new for Rick Wakeman. As a member of the British progressive-rock band Yes during the early 1970s, he literally helped key a new way of rocking that incorporated the grand sweep and instrumental virtuosity of classical music. In Yes, and in a subsequent series of solo concept albums on historical and literary themes, Wakeman may have borrowed a few licks from classical composers for his flashy sallies on an array of keyboard instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM
Rick Wakeman will play a solo piano concert March 12, the latest in a series of benefit performances he is giving for ASSIST, a Christian organization based in Garden Grove. The rock keyboard virtuoso, best known as a former member of Yes, will play in the main sanctuary of Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa at 3800 Fairview Road in Santa Ana. He will offer a career retrospective, drawing upon his rock years as well as his extensive recent catalogue of religious music.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They were technical masters of their instruments, and they never let you forget it. Yes was perhaps the preeminent progressive rock group of the '60s and '70s, a self-indulgent, bombastic and tremendously popular behemoth of a band, which set out to overwhelm the senses with layer upon layer of harmonic sound, classical-derived compositions and look-at-me licks.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
To most fans of progressive rock, Rick Wakeman is a virtuosic keyboards player who made his mark in the '70s with Yes and a subsequent series of elaborate solo opuses about mythic and historical subjects. But Wakeman also has branched into Christian music over the past five years, a development that has been helpful to ASSIST, a Christian organization based in Garden Grove.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM
Rick Wakeman will play a solo piano concert March 12, the latest in a series of benefit performances he is giving for ASSIST, a Christian organization based in Garden Grove. The rock keyboard virtuoso, best known as a former member of Yes, will play in the main sanctuary of Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa at 3800 Fairview Road in Santa Ana. He will offer a career retrospective, drawing upon his rock years as well as his extensive recent catalogue of religious music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Pop stars ranging from Boy George to Eric Clapton will take part in a two-day music festival Sept. 26-27 aimed at raising money for the families of victims of the Hungerford shooting in which 16 people were killed last month, organizers said Saturday. Concert backers include Imagination, Rick Wakeman, Elvis Costello and Madness. Mass murderer Michael Ryan, 27, shot dead 16 people, including his mother, on Aug. 19 in his southern English hometown of Hungerford before killing himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They were technical masters of their instruments, and they never let you forget it. Yes was perhaps the preeminent progressive rock group of the '60s and '70s, a self-indulgent, bombastic and tremendously popular behemoth of a band, which set out to overwhelm the senses with layer upon layer of harmonic sound, classical-derived compositions and look-at-me licks.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
To most fans of progressive rock, Rick Wakeman is a virtuosic keyboards player who made his mark in the '70s with Yes and a subsequent series of elaborate solo opuses about mythic and historical subjects. But Wakeman also has branched into Christian music over the past five years, a development that has been helpful to ASSIST, a Christian organization based in Garden Grove.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1985
I wish to commend The Times on its excellent review of Rick Wakeman's recent concert at the Beverly Theatre. The musical insights were nothing short of brilliant, and the analysis of Wakeman's keyboard technique exhibited the breadth and depth of knowledge so characteristic of The Times' rock reviews. I only hope you devote as much space to Wakeman's concert on Oct. 16 at Fender's. BENTLEY LITTLE Fullerton We can't review every popster who comes into town, but if Wakeman linked up with Bruce S., well.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1986 | TERRY ATKINSON
"Standing Stones: A New Age Compilation." Various artists. "Voices." Claire Hamill. Coda/Jem. Coda's Landscape Series invades Windham Hill's pastoral territory and falls into the same trap--gentleness often becomes blandness. The river-and-ocean-inspired solo piano pieces by Rick Wakeman and Dashiell Rae ripple predictably. Selections by John Themis and Stephen Caudel are nice jazz but nothing special. Tom Newman's piece has a welcome backwoodsy slant.
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