Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRickey S Ross
IN THE NEWS

Rickey S Ross

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1989 | GEORGE STEIN and DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writers
The Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy who is a suspect in the slayings of three South-Central prostitutes denies any involvement in their deaths, according to an attorney who spoke to the man in jail Sunday. Although few new details about the case emerged Sunday, a Los Angeles police official tried to spike speculation among sheriff's deputies that ballistics evidence had failed to conclusively link a gun found in Rickey S. Ross' car to bullets that killed three prostitutes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mistrial was declared Friday in the trial of former Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Rickey Ross, who was charged with attempting to purchase 22 pounds of cocaine from undercover officers. After almost four days of deliberation, the jury deadlocked 9 to 3 in favor of acquitting Ross of three counts of conspiracy to purchase cocaine for resale. Deputy Dist. Atty. Jane Winston said her office will probably seek to retry the case.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | BETTINA BOXALL and JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writers
At 6 feet 2 and more than 220 pounds, Rickey S. Ross was known by some of his colleagues as "a gentle giant," a religious man and conscientious deputy sheriff who had never been seriously disciplined in his 18 years with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. "He was a very good officer, very well regarded," said a fellow deputy who has known Ross for years. "He was highly religious. Nobody would have ever thought of Rickey Ross. He was well-liked by everyone on the department."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy testified Friday that he never planned to buy cocaine with $151,000 found in the trunk of his rented car but thought the cash was to be used for "money laundering." In Rickey Ross' first comments about the case since he was arrested in 1992, he testified that he was set up by a government informant, who had promised financial assistance and lucrative business opportunities if Ross transported the cash for him.
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | JACK JONES and TRACY WOOD, Times Staff Writers
A veteran Los Angeles County sheriff's narcotics investigator has been arrested on suspicion of murdering three prostitutes in South-Central Los Angeles, where police have been investigating the deaths of several women who trade sex for drugs, authorities said Friday. Deputy Rickey Ross, 40, who has been with the Sheriff's Department for 18 years, was spotted with a prostitute in an unmarked county car near the Harbor Freeway and Gage Avenue at 1:30 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1989 | WILLIAM OVEREND and TRACY WOOD, Times Staff Writers
A Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy, who sometimes preached as a lay minister to county jail inmates, was described Saturday by a lawyer as "stunned and devastated" at his arrest as a suspect in the murder of three South-Central area prostitutes. While an investigation into the killings continued, Rickey Ross, 40, was held for his own protection in an isolated cell at the Los Angeles Police Department's Parker Center headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1989
Former Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Rickey Ross Tuesday filed a $400-million suit against the city of Los Angeles and Police Chief Daryl F. Gates for alleged civil rights violations stemming from his arrest on murder charges. Ross was held for 82 days earlier this year on suspicion of killing three South-Central Los Angeles prostitutes, largely due to Los Angeles Police Department ballistics tests linking his gun to the murders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mistrial was declared Friday in the trial of former Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Rickey Ross, who was charged with attempting to purchase 22 pounds of cocaine from undercover officers. After almost four days of deliberation, the jury deadlocked 9 to 3 in favor of acquitting Ross of three counts of conspiracy to purchase cocaine for resale. Deputy Dist. Atty. Jane Winston said her office will probably seek to retry the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1994
During opening statements of the drug conspiracy trial of former Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Rickey Ross on Monday, a prosecutor portrayed him as a member of a narcotics organization who sought to purchase 22 pounds of cocaine from undercover officers. But Ross' attorney contends that he is innocent and those testifying against him, a government informant and former Los Angeles Dodger Derrel Thomas, are "men of questionable background and character."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy testified Friday that he never planned to buy cocaine with $151,000 found in the trunk of his rented car but thought the cash was to be used for "money laundering." In Rickey Ross' first comments about the case since he was arrested in 1992, he testified that he was set up by a government informant, who had promised financial assistance and lucrative business opportunities if Ross transported the cash for him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1994
During opening statements of the drug conspiracy trial of former Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Rickey Ross on Monday, a prosecutor portrayed him as a member of a narcotics organization who sought to purchase 22 pounds of cocaine from undercover officers. But Ross' attorney contends that he is innocent and those testifying against him, a government informant and former Los Angeles Dodger Derrel Thomas, are "men of questionable background and character."
NEWS
January 9, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were both children of South-Central Los Angeles, boys from broken homes who left the neighborhood and made good. One was a baseball player known as one of the best utility men in the major leagues. The other was a cop, assigned to an elite Sheriff's Department narcotics team. During the 1980s, both their careers were derailed, they say, because of false accusations. The baseball player, former Dodger Derrel Thomas, left the major leagues amid rumors of drug use.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | STEPHEN BRAUN and GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They were two men who once moved in different circles, but whose lives have spiraled downward along parallel trajectories. One was a boy of summer, a former Los Angeles Dodger and California Angel who was widely heralded during his playing days as the best utility man in professional baseball. The other was a seasoned Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department narcotics investigator, a well-respected detective with 18 spotless years behind him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1991 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An ex-Los Angeles County sheriff's sergeant who alleges that six of his former narcotics officers beat drug dealers and stole drug money told investigators three years ago that similar allegations were untrue, according to an audiotape played Wednesday for jurors. The federal court jury, which is hearing a civil rights case against five sheriff's deputies and a Los Angeles Police Department detective, listened as Robert R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1989
Former Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Rickey Ross Tuesday filed a $400-million suit against the city of Los Angeles and Police Chief Daryl F. Gates for alleged civil rights violations stemming from his arrest on murder charges. Ross was held for 82 days earlier this year on suspicion of killing three South-Central Los Angeles prostitutes, largely due to Los Angeles Police Department ballistics tests linking his gun to the murders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1989 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
For the second time in recent months, prosecutors dropped charges against a high-profile murder suspect because of disputed ballistics work by a Los Angeles Police Department firearms examiner. Prosecutors on Wednesday dropped their case against Alex Marti, 27, who had been charged in the murder of a suspected drug dealer whose body was found in Bel-Air two years ago.
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | DAVID FREED and STEPHEN BRAUN, Times Staff Writers
A turning point in the life of Deputy Sheriff Rickey Ross came one night about 10 years ago when he crashed his car into a Los Angeles church. That he escaped death in a collision with a house of the Lord was a divine urging, he told friends, a warning that life is to be led on the straight and narrow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Rickey Samuel Ross pleaded not guilty Friday to three counts of first-degree murder in the killings of three South Los Angeles prostitutes. The veteran sheriff's deputy could receive the death penalty if convicted. Flanked by two sheriff's deputies, Ross, 40, stood somberly as he entered his plea before Los Angeles Municipal Judge David S. Milton. Afterward, Ross was taken back to an isolated cell in the County Jail, where he is being held without bail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
A fired Los Angeles County sheriff's investigator once accused of murdering three prostitutes has dropped his efforts to be reinstated to the Sheriff's Department, the county Civil Service Commission disclosed Monday. Former narcotics detective Rickey Ross spent nearly three months in County Jail after his arrest last February, then was released when prosecutors discovered that ballistics tests performed on the deputy's handgun had erroneously linked him to the slayings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989
Fired Sheriff's Deputy Rickey Ross on Wednesday won at least a month's delay of an administrative hearing into whether he will get his job back. The continuance, informally reached in a Los Angeles courtroom, was the subject of a dispute between Ross' new attorney, Howard Weitzman, and the Sheriff's Department. On Tuesday, Weitzman said he needed the time to study the controversial case. But a Sheriff's representative argued that the delay would mean the loss of a key witness.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|