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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989 | CHUCK PHILIPS
The Sunset Strip stands as a beacon to aspiring rock stars around the country. No club scene outside of London has introduced so many top-level rock bands. The legacy began in the '60s with such innovative forces as the Byrds, the Doors, Buffalo Springfield and the Mothers of Invention. It continued in the '70s with the Eagles, Van Halen, X and Motley Crue, and on into the '80s with Guns N' Roses, Los Lobos, Poison and Jane's Addiction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2013 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
A judge handed a death sentence Monday to the violent felon convicted of setting the 2003 Old fire that destroyed more than 1,000 homes, charred the northwestern face of the San Bernardino Mountains and killed five people. His eyes fixed on the judge, Rickie Lee Fowler, 31, didn't show a twitch of emotion as the sentence was announced in a San Bernardino courtroom. Fowler, a methamphetamine user since grammar school, already is serving three life terms for brutally sodomizing a cellmate in county jail.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Rickie Lee Jones is getting the most radio airplay she's gotten in years right now. Unfortunately, most of it is for her contribution to an alternative dance tune, the Orb's "Fluffy Little Clouds," and not for her own superlative new album, "Pop Pop," a jazzy and admittedly not-so-radio-ready collection of personalized standards from decades past. The faithful were still out in force for her top-drawing, top-drawer show Thursday night at Royce Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2012 | By Mikael Wood
In a concert last month at Hollywood's Hotel Cafe, the buzzy English singer Paloma Faith crouched down near the floor to sing "Let Me Down Easy. " It's a tough-love song associated with a number of hardy soul-music veterans, including Bettye LaVette and the late Etta James, and Faith was doing what she could (despite her youth and a seriously movement-constricting dress) to channel some of their gravitas. LaVette does some crouching of her own on "Thankful N' Thoughtful," a powerful new covers album that finds the 66-year-old R&B singer tapping into the desperation of tunes like Neil Young's "Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere" and "Everything Is Broken" by Bob Dylan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Rickie Lee Jones, erstwhile folk-jazz-pop boho heroine, has thrown her old fans a curve with her new album, "Ghostyhead," which sets her introspective, hallucinatory imagery to an aggressive, hard-edged electronic sound. Jones' concert at the El Rey Theatre on Wednesday indicated that she's embracing this experimental approach with an almost obsessive intensity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Rickie Lee Jones scanned the crowd near the Club Lingerie stage after her first number in the first of two shows there Thursday, hoping to see some non-familiar (i.e., non-"industry") faces in the footlights. "I was hoping very much that some real people got in, 'cause I was trying to figure out who bought the tickets," she said earnestly, beaming that Cheshire Cat grin as the whoops and hollers told her the folks wuz real.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Sinatra to Hendrix. Tin Pan Alley to swinging hepster jazz. "Peter Pan" to the Jefferson Airplane. You could say Rickie Lee Jones really boxes the pop compass on "Pop Pop," the upcoming album by the adventuresome songstress. Due out in September, it features a dizzying array of cover songs, ranging from jazz standards and Broadway show tunes to Jimi Hendrix's "Up From the Skies" and a trio of songs that were hits for Frank Sinatra.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1987 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"Taxes and death and trouble-- this I know," sang Rickie Lee Jones at the Palace Court shortly after midnight Wednesday, providing at least as likely a prophecy for 1987 as any to be found in the tabloids. Jones, one of pop's most acclaimed and individualistic figures, doesn't do many concerts, so an appearance by her in a tiny (100-seat room) on New Year's Eve could be the stuff of legend. This singer-songwriter isn't the likeliest of New Year's Eve attractions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2008 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't exactly Mott the Hoople glam-rock mixed with urban-jazzy Black Power horns, and it wasn't a vaudeville show with jugglers and other attractions -- two ideas that the headliner has been tossing around -- but Rickie Lee Jones' show on Monday at the Echoplex delivered on its promise of something special. This was the first of Jones' four Monday night concerts at the Echo Park club, and while many of L.A.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
A San Bernardino County jury on Friday ordered a death sentence for the violent methamphetamine addict convicted of setting the catastrophic 2003 Old fire that destroyed 1,000 homes, blackened the San Bernardino Mountains and led to five deaths. The jury in August found that Rickie Lee Fowler deliberately set the blaze by tossing a lighted road flare into brush at the base of the mountains on an October day when Southern California already was overwhelmed by wind-fed wildfires, convicting him of murder and arson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
The San Bernardino man convicted of setting the 2003 Old fire that destroyed 1,000 homes and led to five deaths is a sadistic felon who raped, robbed and tortured people throughout his life and deserves a death sentence, a San Bernardino County prosecutor told jurors Thursday. Deputy Dist. Atty. Robert Bullock told jurors that Rickie Lee Fowler's drug addiction and horrific childhood did not excuse the "misery and mayhem" he caused. Defense attorney Michael Belter acknowledged the trail of devastation Fowler left but urged jurors to consider the nightmare of a childhood that twisted Fowler's psyche.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
A San Bernardino man was convicted of murder and arson Wednesday for his role in sparking the 2003 Old fire, which led to the deaths of five people, destroyed 1,000 homes and blackened a huge swath of the San Bernardino Mountains. Rickie Lee Fowler, described by prosecutors as a career criminal, was found to have deliberately set the blaze, which grew to 91,000 acres, by tossing a lighted road flare into the parched brush at the base of the mountains. Prosecutors charged Fowler in the deaths of five men, the oldest of whom was 94, whose fatal heart attacks were said to be directly attributable to the stress they experienced because of the fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2009 | Randy Lewis; August Brown
Carrie Underwood Play On 19 Recordings/Arista Nashville If there's a slam-dunk aspect to Carrie Underwood's third album, it's that she's handed her "American Idol" benefactors a theme song for the next episode of "Idol Gives Back." That song is "Change," an exercise in social responsibility that challenges the listener to stay open to the possibility that a small gesture can make a big difference. Underwood puts that idea across convincingly -- it's one that also would do wonders for her music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2009 | David Kelly and Robert J. Lopez
A San Bernardino man was charged Tuesday with five counts of murder for allegedly setting the massive 2003 Old fire that destroyed nearly a 1,000 homes. Rickie Lee Fowler, 28, who has been in state prison since 2003 for burglary, also was charged with arson and aggravated arson, authorities said. If convicted, he could face the death penalty. "The investigators in this case never gave up; there was tremendous follow-up," San Bernardino County Dist. Atty. Mike Ramos said at a news conference Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2008 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't exactly Mott the Hoople glam-rock mixed with urban-jazzy Black Power horns, and it wasn't a vaudeville show with jugglers and other attractions -- two ideas that the headliner has been tossing around -- but Rickie Lee Jones' show on Monday at the Echoplex delivered on its promise of something special. This was the first of Jones' four Monday night concerts at the Echo Park club, and while many of L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Rickie Lee Jones scanned the crowd near the Club Lingerie stage after her first number in the first of two shows there Thursday, hoping to see some non-familiar (i.e., non-"industry") faces in the footlights. "I was hoping very much that some real people got in 'cause I was trying to figure out who bought the tickets," she said earnestly, beaming that Cheshire Cat grin as the whoops and hollers told her the folks wuz real.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2000 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even when an audience is eager to be mesmerized, few singer-songwriters can weave a spell like the one Rickie Lee Jones cast Tuesday over a packed crowd at the El Rey Theatre. The veteran boho-jazz-pop artist molded time and space at whim, relaying human pain, comedy and bliss with the authority of someone who has witnessed it all, and the deceptive ease of a vocalist in full command of her singular instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
RICKIE LEE JONES was living in a house facing a three-way intersection on Sunset Boulevard, and sometimes she'd sit on the lawn and watch the street life roll west like a sooty river looking for the sea. "There were all these people driving in from wherever to look at the ocean, and it reminded me of when I was a kid living in Arizona and my family would drive to visit my Uncle Bob in Pomona and we would always pile in the car and go look at the ocean. It's what you do."
MAGAZINE
October 5, 2003 | Oscar Garza, Oscar Garza is deputy editor of the Los Angeles Times Magazine.
If someone asked you to listen to a song called "Tell Somebody (Repeal the Patriot Act NOW)," you'd probably cringe at the possibility--indeed, the likelihood--of a preachy message being delivered over the relentless strumming of an acoustic guitar and the incessant banging of a tambourine. Has the Kingston Trio been revived? Maybe it's an outtake from "A Mighty Wind," Christopher Guest's film parody about a reunion of time-warped '60s folkies.
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