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Riddick Bowe

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March 3, 1991 | KEN DENLINGER, WASHINGTON POST
For your listening pleasure, the young heavyweight unbeaten in 21 pro fights will slip into the soft, seductive voice of Ronald Reagan and invite you to join him and Nancy for Thanksgiving dinner. Without much coaxing, Riddick Bowe also does Richard Pryor, Stevie Wonder and some others -- and can recite The Legend of Cassius Clay as Cassius Clay. This has been, for the 23-year-old Bowe, as much hindrance as help.
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April 8, 2005 | Steve Springer, Times Staff Writer
At the age of 37, weighing 280 pounds, making only his second appearance in the ring after an absence of nearly eight years, former two-time heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe didn't fool anybody Thursday night in Temecula. Fighting in the 10-round main event at Pechanga Casino, he looked like a 37-year-old, 280-pounder attempting a comeback.
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SPORTS
June 3, 1998 | Associated Press
Former undisputed heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe was indicted Tuesday for allegedly abducting his estranged wife and their five children from their suburban Charlotte home and driving them to Virginia. A U.S. District Court grand jury named Bowe in a one-count indictment charging him with interstate domestic violence. He faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine if convicted. Judy Bowe and the couple's five children were uninjured in the alleged Feb. 25 abduction, authorities said.
SPORTS
April 7, 2005 | Steve Springer, Times Staff Writer
Promoter Dan Goossen had his newest fighter, former two-time heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe, right where he wanted him, in the center of a ring of media members, cameras running, tape recorders operating, notebooks filling up. Yet Goossen, momentarily forgetting the boxing adage that all publicity is good publicity, suddenly leaped into the mix, trying to protect his fighter from the barrage of questions coming at Bowe from all sides: Why did you abduct your former wife and five children?
SPORTS
September 6, 1990 | ALAN GOLDSTEIN, BALTIMORE SUN
Like a born politician, Riddick Bowe worked one of the capital's busiest intersections, pressing palms, signing autographs, kissing women and babies, exchanging wisecracks and even doing passable imitations of Eddie Murphy, Stevie Wonder and Muhammad Ali. After a half-hour, he changed into his work clothes, donning white boxing trunks to skip rope and shadowbox against a few brave volunteers in the crowd.
SPORTS
October 17, 1993 | TIM DAHLBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
His day had begun with a private jet flying him in from training at Lake Tahoe. Now, Riddick Bowe was watching the palm trees and urban sprawl of Southern California go by as he rode in a limousine down Hollywood Boulevard. The holder of two-thirds of the heavyweight title searched the back of the limo for a bottle of orange juice to help his nagging cold as he embarked on a grueling day-long tour of Los Angeles recently to promote his Nov. 6 rematch with Evander Holyfield.
SPORTS
March 30, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Fisticuffs were out of the question, since it was a major mismatch. One combatant would have been a 47-year-old bantamweight, the other a 19-year-old super-heavyweight. Instead, it ended with heated words and the prompt issuance of a plane ticket home. That's how the bantamweight, U.S. Olympic boxing Coach Ken Adams, showed everyone who's in charge here. The incident occurred last December, at a USA Amateur Boxing Federation workout at the U.S. Olympic Committee Training Center here.
SPORTS
November 12, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddie Futch, who is well on his way to becoming boxing's George Burns, says he at first resisted overtures to train Riddick Bowe, the super-heavyweight silver medalist at the 1988 Summer Olympics. "I hadn't watched him at the Olympics, but I'd heard all the stories about him," Futch said this week. "I'd heard he was lazy, didn't have much heart or discipline. I was 78 then and I told Rock Newman (Bowe's manager) that I didn't have enough time left to waste it on someone like that."
SPORTS
May 11, 1997 | SHIRLEY POVICH, WASHINGTON POST
The sudden decision of Riddick Bowe to retire from the ring wars at the age of 29 set up an opportunity for a vintage deal for boxing. George Foreman could have made it unanimous by also announcing his retirement: a riddance to both of them. Riddick Bowe was not a serious offender, despite the 40-1-1 record he compiled, mostly against a long line of victims-in-waiting.
SPORTS
January 17, 2003 | From Wire Reports
Former heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe was sentenced Thursday to 18 months in federal prison for the 1998 abduction of his estranged wife and children. Bowe was in court for the three-minute hearing, at which U.S. District Judge Graham Mullen followed through on an appeals court's October sentencing order. Mullen twice previously had given Bowe lighter sentences that were rejected by the appeals court. After Bowe is released from prison, he must serve supervised release for two years.
SPORTS
June 3, 1998 | Associated Press
Former undisputed heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe was indicted Tuesday for allegedly abducting his estranged wife and their five children from their suburban Charlotte home and driving them to Virginia. A U.S. District Court grand jury named Bowe in a one-count indictment charging him with interstate domestic violence. He faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine if convicted. Judy Bowe and the couple's five children were uninjured in the alleged Feb. 25 abduction, authorities said.
SPORTS
October 4, 1997 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heavyweight Lennox Lewis, the two-time World Boxing Council champion, will defend his title tonight against Andrew Golota, who hasn't fought since being disqualified for low blows in consecutive fights against Riddick Bowe last year. Lewis is 31-1 with 25 knockouts and needs a victory over Golota to set up a possible unification showdown early next year with the winner of November's Evander Holyfield-Michael Moorer fight. Lewis and Golota each weighed 244 pounds.
SPORTS
May 11, 1997 | SHIRLEY POVICH, WASHINGTON POST
The sudden decision of Riddick Bowe to retire from the ring wars at the age of 29 set up an opportunity for a vintage deal for boxing. George Foreman could have made it unanimous by also announcing his retirement: a riddance to both of them. Riddick Bowe was not a serious offender, despite the 40-1-1 record he compiled, mostly against a long line of victims-in-waiting.
SPORTS
May 1, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe retired Wednesday, ending a sometimes bizarre career that featured a paraglider, a riot, two successful defenses by disqualification and an aborted stint in the Marines. Bowe, the last undisputed heavyweight champion, will become a goodwill ambassador for HBO's boxing community service program. He ended his career with a 40-1 record, with 32 knockouts.
SPORTS
May 1, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe retired Wednesday, apparently ending a sometimes bizarre career that featured a paraglider, a riot, two successful defenses by disqualification and an aborted stint in the Marines. Bowe, the last undisputed heavyweight champion, will become a goodwill ambassador for HBO's boxing community service program. He ended his career with a 40-1 record, with 32 knockouts.
SPORTS
May 9, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Heavyweight Riddick Bowe will fight Rodolfo Marin of Puerto Rico on the undercard of the Tyson-Ruddock rematch June 28.
SPORTS
March 15, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER
Stop me if you've heard this one: Sugar Ray Leonard wants to fight again. Stop me if you've heard this one: Riddick Bowe wants to join the Marines. And this is not old news. Unfortunately. Leonard wants to fight even after getting pounded by Hector Camacho on March 1 at Atlantic City, N.J. Bowe wants to get into the Marines even after lasting only three days in basic training last month. What's next, Wilt Chamberlain filling in until Shaquille O'Neal returns to the Lakers?
SPORTS
March 2, 1997 | TONY KORHEISER, Washington Post
I take no responsibility for this column. I'm not writing it--a sheep is. I don't want to get too sidetracked with the whole cloning issue--"cloning issue"--get it? But if you could clone athletes, think how it would affect sports. Let's say each pro team was allowed to clone one athlete. Cleveland would clone Jim Brown. The Bulls would clone Michael Jordan. The Dodgers would clone sand Koufax. And the Capitals would clone a defensive-minded forward who'd immediately break his heel.
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