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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1988
Zycher's article is so outrageous, it must have been written tongue-in-cheek. The AQMD is striking out into new areas of authority because the Legislature decided, in its wisdom, that residents of this basin want clean air in our lifetimes, not 2050. Zycher's opinion that people will not make changes in the way they get to work, if the right incentives are provided, is not borne out in practice. Fifty percent of ARCO's employees car-pool, for example, primarily because that downtown company provides a wide range of employee car-pool percs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Ride-sharing company Uber is upping the ante in its drive to persuade government regulators that the public is protected when its drivers are between fares. Uber announced Friday that it was closing a so-called insurance gap in its service. The company has been insuring its drivers when carrying Uber passengers. Now it says it is providing contingency insurance that covers property damage and injuries caused by an Uber driver even when he or she is between fares.
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BUSINESS
September 19, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California regulators have approved the nation's and state's first rules for fast-growing ride-sharing companies that connect passengers to drivers via smartphones. The Public Utilities Commission voted 5 to 0 to let the services -- such as Lyft Inc., Sidecar and Uber Technologies Inc. -- continue to operate, if they comply with basic safety and insurance requirements. The three companies provide transportation for a fee or donation, connecting paying passengers with drivers who use their own vehicles.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Ride-sharing company Lyft is improving its insurance coverage for drivers and passengers after state regulators complained that there could be holes in the coverage that Lyft and its competitors provide. Critics questioned whether the policy goes far enough to fully protect people involved in accidents. Lyft announced this week that it's giving drivers the option of getting collision insurance to repair damage to their cars. It's also offering protection against being hit by an uninsured or underinsured driver to its basic, $1-million commercial liability coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By David Zahniser and Laura Nelson
The Los Angeles City Council is weighing a challenge to the app-driven ride-sharing companies that have been offering an alternative to driving or hailing taxicabs. Councilman Paul Koretz is pushing for his colleagues to appeal a recent decision by the Public Utilities Commission allowing companies such as Lyft and SideCar to operate with regulation at the statewide level. The council is set to meet Friday behind closed doors to discuss the idea with city lawyers. Passengers using ride-sharing services schedule their trips using the companies' mobile phone apps, and almost always pay a fare lower than those charged for taxis.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher and Salvador Rodriguez
SACRAMENTO - Ride-sharing companies that connect passengers to drivers via smartphones should be allowed to continue operating in California if they comply with basic safety rules, state regulators proposed Tuesday. The recommendation now goes to the five-member Public Utilities Commission as early as its Sept. 5 meeting. Commissioners can accept or deny the recommendations or offer alternatives for regulating such increasingly popular ride-sharing companies as Lyft Inc., Sidecar and Uber Technologies Inc. The three companies provide transportation for a fee or donation , connecting paying passengers with drivers who use their own vehicles.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher and Salvador Rodriguez
SACRAMENTO - A deadly accident involving a California ride-sharing driver has brought to light a potential downside to this new high-tech carpooling: Who pays when something goes wrong? Companies such as Uber, Lyft and Sidecar have long insisted that the insurance they provide their drivers is sufficient to cover accidents. But a recent tragedy shows the murky legal terrain in which these new taxi-like services operate. On New Year's Eve, an Uber driver struck and killed a 6-year-old girl who was crossing a San Francisco street with her family.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Ride-sharing company Lyft is improving its insurance coverage for drivers and passengers after state regulators complained that there could be holes in the coverage that Lyft and its competitors provide. Critics questioned whether the policy goes far enough to fully protect people involved in accidents. Lyft announced this week that it's giving drivers the option of getting collision insurance to repair damage to their cars. It's also offering protection against being hit by an uninsured or underinsured driver to its basic, $1-million commercial liability coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2013 | By David Zahniser and Laura J. Nelson
The Los Angeles City Council is weighing a challenge to the app-driven ride-sharing companies that have given residents new transportation options while drawing protests from the taxicab industry. Councilman Paul Koretz is pushing for his colleagues to appeal a recent decision by the Public Utilities Commission to allow companies such as Lyft and Sidecar to operate under regulation at the statewide level. The council is set to meet Tuesday behind closed doors to discuss the possible appeal with city lawyers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
A motion to appeal California's new rules for ride-sharing services failed by one vote Wednesday at a Los Angeles City Council meeting, capping months of debate about the city's role in regulating the new taxi competitors. The appeal motion, which needed eight votes for approval, failed on a 7-6 vote. It would have laid the groundwork for a lawsuit against the California Public Utilities Commission, which last month created the nation's and the state's first regulations for ride-sharing firms such as Lyft, Uber X and Sidecar.
OPINION
February 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
In the new world of the sharing economy, companies such as Uber, Lyft and Sidecar have made a compelling case that government shouldn't treat them the same way it treats conventional service providers. They're not taxi companies; instead, they empower people to act as part-time limo drivers. But regulators still have to make sure that the public is protected when something goes wrong. A recent fatal accident involving a driver who used Uber highlights gaps in the insurance coverage that ride-sharing services, their drivers and state regulators can't ignore.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher and Salvador Rodriguez
SACRAMENTO - A deadly accident involving a California ride-sharing driver has brought to light a potential downside to this new high-tech carpooling: Who pays when something goes wrong? Companies such as Uber, Lyft and Sidecar have long insisted that the insurance they provide their drivers is sufficient to cover accidents. But a recent tragedy shows the murky legal terrain in which these new taxi-like services operate. On New Year's Eve, an Uber driver struck and killed a 6-year-old girl who was crossing a San Francisco street with her family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Passengers arriving at LAX will no longer be able to use the peer-to-peer ride-sharing service uberX - which connects private car owners with people seeking a ride - to call a car to pick them up at the airport. Writing in a blogpost , Uber spokesperson Andrew Noyes said that airport authorities' decision to issue citations to uberX drivers - who, unlike taxi drivers or limo services, do not have the permits required to pick up passengers - had led uberX to temporarily stop making pickups.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A recent effort by Uber to poach drivers from a rival ride-sharing service in New York has backfired, giving media attention to the lesser known service and making Uber come off as a bully. Gett, an Israeli start-up that launched in New York last August, saw its service get flooded with nearly 200 fake ride requests from Uber employees last week. "These individuals ordered cars and then canceled each order after the Gett driver was dispatched or had arrived," Gett said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
A sharply divided Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday failed to muster the votes needed to file an appeal challenging California's rules for ride-sharing services, capping months of debate about the city's role in regulating the new taxi competitors. The appeal motion, which failed 7 to 6, would have laid the groundwork for a lawsuit against the California Public Utilities Commission. The PUC last month created the nation's and the state's first regulations for firms such as Lyft, Uber X and Sidecar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
A motion to appeal California's new rules for ride-sharing services failed by one vote Wednesday at a Los Angeles City Council meeting, capping months of debate about the city's role in regulating the new taxi competitors. The appeal motion, which needed eight votes for approval, failed on a 7-6 vote. It would have laid the groundwork for a lawsuit against the California Public Utilities Commission, which last month created the nation's and the state's first regulations for ride-sharing firms such as Lyft, Uber X and Sidecar.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Andrea Chang and Salvador Rodriguez
SACRAMENTO - California has given the green light to online services that link passengers with private car owners - a sign that government is adapting to peer-to-peer commerce that's disrupting established industries. On Thursday, the Public Utilities Commission unanimously approved new rules to support on-demand ride-sharing services such as Uber, Lyft and Sidecar. The vote makes California the first state in the nation to formally endorse and regulate such services, which have taken off in big cities as an alternative to driving or hailing taxis.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian Tuesday launched a re-energized, $1-million advertising campaign aimed at reducing traffic congestion and smog by persuading solo drivers to leave their cars at home and join ride-sharing pools. To help him announce the campaign at Universal City, the governor enlisted the support of the mothers of entertainment and sports celebrities to promote the campaign theme that "your mother always taught you to share" and she "still knows what is best for you." Celebrity Mothers Appearing with Deukmejian at Texaco Plaza were Jackie Stallone, mother of Sylvester Stallone, and Georgia Holt, mother of Cher.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Jon Healey
The state Public Utilities Commission issued rules last month to govern how Uber, Lyft and other Web-based transportation services operate in California. But the PUC's action didn't satisfy the taxi industry and its allies, including Los Angeles City Councilman Paul Koretz, who don't want the state to take the regulatory wheel. So Koretz is trotting out an argument familiar to anyone who's sought to block a competitor from entering the market: He contends that the PUC violated the California Environmental Quality Act. That's not Koretz's sole argument against the PUC's new regulations, mind you. In an interview Tuesday, he said that the rules were inadequate in many ways to protect the public against fraudulent and unsafe ride-sharing services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant and Laura J. Nelson
Despite a threatened veto, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday is expected to consider challenging a state decision to legalize app-based ride-sharing companies. The California Public Utilities Commission acted last month to create a new regulatory scheme for firms such as Lyft, UberX and Sidecar to legally compete with taxis for customers. The so-called "transportation network companies" will be required to obtain permits, perform background checks and create driver training programs.
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