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Riders In The Sky Music Group

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August 19, 1989 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Riders in the Sky's latest album, "Riders Go Commercial," on MCA, opens with a comedy skit set in the label's corporate offices: A company bigwig callously broaches the idea of selling commercial time on the trio's new record. It's the only way, the executive reasons, to justify keeping a group that specializes in music of the American West and doesn't sell a fraction as many records as label mate Tiffany.
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July 18, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The recent passing of Roy Rogers has brought renewed attention to western music. So the timing couldn't be better for tonight's county fair concert in Costa Mesa by Riders in the Sky, a group that followed the trail blazed by that famous singing cowboy. Rogers--who died July 6 of congestive heart failure at age 86--was a big influence, said Ranger Doug (nee Douglas B. Green), the Riders' lead vocalist, guitarist and songwriter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The recent passing of Roy Rogers has brought renewed attention to western music. So the timing couldn't be better for tonight's county fair concert in Costa Mesa by Riders in the Sky, a group that followed the trail blazed by that famous singing cowboy. Rogers--who died July 6 of congestive heart failure at age 86--was a big influence, said Ranger Doug (nee Douglas B. Green), the Riders' lead vocalist, guitarist and songwriter.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1989 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Riders in the Sky's latest album, "Riders Go Commercial," on MCA, opens with a comedy skit set in the label's corporate offices: A company bigwig callously broaches the idea of selling commercial time on the trio's new record. It's the only way, the executive reasons, to justify keeping a group that specializes in music of the American West and doesn't sell a fraction as many records as label mate Tiffany.
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