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Ridge Route

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1987
Irvin Borders' letter (Feb. 11)) may question the photo caption of your wonderful article (Feb. 1) on the "Old Ridge Route," but I very clearly remember in 1927, at the age of 7, that my mother, who had one of the first driver's licenses in the state, my brother and I drove the Ridge Route in a new 1927 Buick sedan, dark blue with black fenders, purchased from Howard Buick Co. on Figueroa Street, to San Francisco. The trip was made in three days so my brother and I could see the interior of California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 17, 2013
Re "Ridge Route group's rough go," Jan. 13 This article on the historic Ridge Route's continued closure by the U.S. Forest Service illuminates still another bloated, dysfunctional federal bureaucracy that cannot get anything worthwhile accomplished. The many dedicated professionals at the working level are bogged down by excessive levels of authority, which will not or cannot make any meaningful decisions. The solution is downsizing every federal and state department at the top and empowering those who really care and know what should be done, while streamlining and simplifying the regulations and procedures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
The roadblock facing Harrison Scott and his aging band of volunteers as they try to preserve the Ridge Route north of Los Angeles isn't just the heavy steel gate across the historic paved roadway that was the first to link Northern and Southern California. As Scott tells it, it's also the U.S. Forest Service, which technically owns the two-lane road that was created by horse-drawn scrapers in 1914 across ridge tops dotting the Sierra Pelona mountain range north of Castaic. The Ridge Route's place in California history is well-documented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
The roadblock facing Harrison Scott and his aging band of volunteers as they try to preserve the Ridge Route north of Los Angeles isn't just the heavy steel gate across the historic paved roadway that was the first to link Northern and Southern California. As Scott tells it, it's also the U.S. Forest Service, which technically owns the two-lane road that was created by horse-drawn scrapers in 1914 across ridge tops dotting the Sierra Pelona mountain range north of Castaic. The Ridge Route's place in California history is well-documented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1997 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The left turn that Harrison Scott took on a whim one day while traveling down a country road north of Los Angeles took him on a detour that lasted six years. He shouldn't have been surprised, though. For about 83 years the stomach-grabbing mountain highway between Castaic and Gorman that they call the Ridge Route has caught motorists unaware.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1997
In Southern California, a region built on the automobile's promises of freedom and the engineer's ingenuity, it is uniquely fitting that the latest addition to the National Register of Historic Places is a road--a 30-mile stretch of stomach-wrenching pavement linking Castaic and Gorman. The old Ridge Route, cut across the San Gabriel Mountains in 1914, connected Los Angeles to Bakersfield and cracked open the region to the rest of the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2000 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a chance to see Southern California as it used to be--beautiful, uninhabited mountains and valleys suggestive of mystery and adventure--take a drive on the Old Ridge Route. The 17.5-mile stretch of little-used two-lane road was built with picks, shovels, wagons and dynamite in the mountains between Castaic and Gorman during the waning days of the Wild West. Its purpose was to connect Los Angeles commercially to the San Joaquin Valley and Northern California.
NEWS
February 1, 1987 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
Today, it's Interstate 5, a generous, eight-lane freeway that sweeps you over the mountains from Los Angeles to Bakersfield in about two hours. A few years back, it was Highway 99--originally two lanes, later three and eventually four--a relatively fast road, but steep and dangerous, best remembered for runaway trucks that maimed and killed on the infamous Grapevine and Five-Mile grades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA
The city is opposing an Interstate 5 overpass at Ridge Route Drive, which opponents say could flood quiet neighborhoods with traffic. The City Council authorized the hiring of a traffic consultant to develop an alternative to the Ridge Route overpass, which is being funded by county Measure M transportation funds. Ridge Route now dead-ends at Interstate 5. City officials and residents fear the overpass would turn Ridge Route into a major thoroughfare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
A radio traffic report suggested an old-fashioned alternative to blocked freeway lanes on Interstate 5 north of the Santa Clarita Valley. "You might try the old Ridge Route to save some time," the announcer recommended one afternoon late last month. Seventy years after being abandoned by the state, the historic mountain-hopping roadway that first connected Northern and Southern California is again starting to command the public's respect. And attention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
A radio traffic report suggested an old-fashioned alternative to blocked freeway lanes on Interstate 5 north of the Santa Clarita Valley. "You might try the old Ridge Route to save some time," the announcer recommended one afternoon late last month. Seventy years after being abandoned by the state, the historic mountain-hopping roadway that first connected Northern and Southern California is again starting to command the public's respect. And attention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2000 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a chance to see Southern California as it used to be--beautiful, uninhabited mountains and valleys suggestive of mystery and adventure--take a drive on the Old Ridge Route. The 17.5-mile stretch of little-used two-lane road was built with picks, shovels, wagons and dynamite in the mountains between Castaic and Gorman during the waning days of the Wild West. Its purpose was to connect Los Angeles commercially to the San Joaquin Valley and Northern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1998 | FRANK MESSINA
A long-awaited pedestrian tunnel project at Ridge Route Drive could move forward if the City Council approves a right-of-way agreement with the Orange County Transportation Authority tonight. If also approved by OCTA, the agreement would permit the city to press ahead with preliminary design plans for tunnel improvements. Traffic now must stop along busy Ridge Route Drive, about a quarter of a mile east of Jeronimo Road, to permit pedestrians to cross the street. The 7 p.m.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The left turn that Harrison Scott took on a whim one day while traveling down a country road north of Los Angeles took him on a detour that lasted six years. He shouldn't have been surprised, though. For about 83 years the stomach-grabbing mountain highway between Castaic and Gorman that they call the Ridge Route has caught motorists unaware.
TRAVEL
November 16, 1997 | JOHN McKINNEY
From the long ridge top of Liebre Mountain, a marvelous vista unfolds: the northwest corner of the San Gabriel Mountains, the Tehachapis, the sunbaked floor of the Antelope Valley. This is not gentle country. No wonder pioneer highway builders had such difficulty scraping out a roadway to connect Los Angeles with Bakersfield and the Central Valley. Constructing the highway in 1924 was quite a task.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1997
Thanks for the article "Ridge Route's Scholar," Oct. 13. This brings back old memories, as my family traveled that way in the winter of 1916, moving from Van Nuys to a farm eight miles west of Tulare. [I recall] going through the Newhall Tunnel, through Saugus to the Ridge Route, going up the grade to Sandberg's in a Model T Ford. My dad had to turn around and back up, as gas would not run into the carburetor from the tank under the front seat. My mother and aunt had to get out and push to get through the mud. (We made yearly trips to Burbank to visit relatives, taking over eight hours to make the trip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1997
In Southern California, a region built on the automobile's promises of freedom and the engineer's ingenuity, it is uniquely fitting that the latest addition to the National Register of Historic Places is a road--a 30-mile stretch of stomach-wrenching pavement linking Castaic and Gorman. The old Ridge Route, cut across the San Gabriel Mountains in 1914, connected Los Angeles to Bakersfield and cracked open the region to the rest of the state.
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