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Ridgewood Ranch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2004 | Robert Hollis, Times Staff Writer
Mendocino County environmentalists and historical preservationists are nearing completion of a complex deal that would permanently protect more than 4,600 acres of the historic Ridgewood Ranch, final resting place of the famed racehorse Seabiscuit. Nestled in an oak- and redwood-studded valley about eight miles south of Willits, the ranch became a beacon in the 1940s for thousands of Seabiscuit fans who made the pilgrimage 130 miles north from San Francisco to see the legendary horse.
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SPORTS
October 31, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Make no bones about it. The location of Seabiscuit's burial is an issue. Friday and Saturday, as many as 100,000 horse racing fans will gather at Santa Anita to watch the Breeders' Cup. Some may wander to the paddock, where a bronze statue commemorates Seabiscuit and his legendary 1940 victory in the Santa Anita Handicap. Seabiscuit was an oft-injured thoroughbred whose gritty races caught the attention of an American public needing domestic heroes during the Great Depression and at wartime.
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SPORTS
October 31, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Make no bones about it. The location of Seabiscuit's burial is an issue. Friday and Saturday, as many as 100,000 horse racing fans will gather at Santa Anita to watch the Breeders' Cup. Some may wander to the paddock, where a bronze statue commemorates Seabiscuit and his legendary 1940 victory in the Santa Anita Handicap. Seabiscuit was an oft-injured thoroughbred whose gritty races caught the attention of an American public needing domestic heroes during the Great Depression and at wartime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2004 | Robert Hollis, Times Staff Writer
Mendocino County environmentalists and historical preservationists are nearing completion of a complex deal that would permanently protect more than 4,600 acres of the historic Ridgewood Ranch, final resting place of the famed racehorse Seabiscuit. Nestled in an oak- and redwood-studded valley about eight miles south of Willits, the ranch became a beacon in the 1940s for thousands of Seabiscuit fans who made the pilgrimage 130 miles north from San Francisco to see the legendary horse.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
A preservation group put Vermont on its list of America's most endangered places Monday, warning that this New England state's small-town charm was threatened by Wal-Mart. Vermont is the only state ever to make the National Trust for Historic Preservation's annual list in its entirety. The state has four Wal-Marts -- all small by company standards -- and Vermont preservationists say the company is planning to enlarge two of them and open five new ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2003 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
The local newspaper headline seemed a little alarmist: "Seabiscuit Fever Grips City." But here in the state's economically depressed northern hill country, the heat of attention can be a good thing. Mostly abandoned by the timber industry, forsaken by the railroads and ignored by tourists who speed through town on U.S. Highway 101, Willits is hoping to cash in on America's revived love affair with a dead horse.
SPORTS
June 26, 1988 | GRAHAME L. JONES, Special to The Times
In the summer of 1936, "a lean, tired, sore-kneed horse," came into the possession of two men. In the summer of 1938, that same horse won the first running of the Hollywood Gold Cup. After two major disappointments--defeats by a nose in the Santa Anita Handicap in both 1937 and 1938--it was a major triumph for a bay 5-year-old named Seabiscuit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
It's a steakhouse that celebrates horseflesh. And 65 years after a horse named Seabiscuit sent people racing to the Derby, a movie called "Seabiscuit" seems poised to do the same thing again. The venerable Arcadia restaurant was opened in 1938 by jockey George Woolf. It was the year he rode Seabiscuit to a Pimlico match-race victory over War Admiral in what many consider the greatest horserace in history.
TRAVEL
October 29, 2006 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
THE luxury speedboat pulled up to the dock of a sun-dappled hacienda, and a bikini-clad blond dug around the bow searching for something. When she found it, she slipped the slinky, black cocktail dress over her swimsuit and sashayed down a footpath -- through a field of lavender and around the occasional fig tree -- to a swank wine-tasting room. You'd expect that at the waterfront playground of Nice. Just not this Nice.
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